Resume help!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by cafink, Mar 4, 2002.

  1. cafink

    cafink Producer

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    Carl Fink
    Okay, here's the scoop: I'm 21, a junior in college (computer science major) and I've never had a job. Sad, I know.
    Anyway, I was chatting with one of my professors today, and he asked if I was interested in a computer-related job after school and during the summer. I said, "sure!" He asked me to give him a copy of my resume. The catch, as you might have guessed, is that I don't have a resume. He told me to put one together and give it to him tomorrow, so I'm trying to do just that.
    Of course, it's not easy when you have no work experience and no extracurricular activities. I listed what computer skills I have and concentrated on my education background. I might not be much outside of the classroom but I've always been something of a model student, especially in high school. It wouldn't be appropriate to list something like my ACT and SAT scores, would it?
    Here's what I've come up with so far. I scoured the web and modeled mine after a couple of sample resumes I found. I really have no idea what a good resume looks like, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. At the very least, my goal is to not embarrass myself. [​IMG]
    I know I've really missed the boad the past few years with regard to employment and whatnot, but I feel bad enough about that already, so there's no need to remind me, thanks.
    Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. socrates maroudis

    socrates maroudis Auditioning

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    I have written my resume over at least a dozen times. This is what I would do, and it is only my opinion. Take your objective out or make it more specific to the job that you want. Put the education section before computer skills. Try to add a section with experience. It doesn't have to be work experience. It could be a school project or programs that you have written or something else along those lines. If you build your own computers, you could put that in as well. I hope my suggestions help.
     
  3. Chad Ellinger

    Chad Ellinger Second Unit

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    I'm a senior comp sci major at University of Maryland. One thing I did was to list all of my upper level comp sci classes, explaining what was required of each class and what skills I learned. Many entry-level positions don't expect a lot of experience, but it helps to show off whatever you've got.
     
  4. Gui A

    Gui A Supporting Actor

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    Put your education first. That's a definite.

    Expand your Computer skills... have each one in a sentence of its own. Use buzz words.

    I had a list of buzz words, but it was too long (9k!). Email me if you really need it.

    Here's what I got from one of my professors...

    The sections of a resume...

    MASTHEAD:

    Containing your name, address, town, phone number, email

    YOUR CAREER OR INTERN (APPROPRIATELY) OBJECTIVE:

    A sentence of no less than 15 words telling us what the hell you want

    to do!

    ACADEMIC SKILLS

    Your College, the Program, the City, Graduate 2001

    Do the same for other Educational Institutions attended

    INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

    Those skills that make you different:

    LANGUAGES

    COMPUTER PROWESS

    SELF-HELP SEMINARS

    SPECIAL TRAINING

    PRESENTATION SKILLS - TYPES

    TEAMWORK SKILLS

    Areas where people have trusted you in related work situations and

    leadership roles.

    Name them, brag, what awards?

    TO FURTHER EXPLAIN THE 'EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS' THING: THIS COME FROM

    OTTAWA:

    EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS PROFILE from the Corporate Council on Education

    The Conference Board of Canada The Corporate Council on Education,

    a program of the National Business and Education Centre,

    Conference Board of Canada developed this document

    255 Smyth Rd, Ottawa Ontario K1H 8M7 613-526-3280 FAX 613-546-4857

    What are Employers Looking for from A Graduating Class?

    ACADEMIC SKILLS

    Those skills, which provide the basic foundation to get, keep and

    progress on a job and to achieve the best results.

    Canadian employers need a person who can:

    COMMUNICATE

    Understand and speak the languages in which the business is conducted.

    Listen to understand and learn.

    Read, comprehend and use written materials including graphs, charts and

    displays.

    Write effectively in the languages in which business is conducted.

    THINK

    Think critically and act logically to evaluate situations, solve

    problems and make decisions.

    Understand and solve problems involving mathematics and use the results.

    Use technology, instruments, tools and information systems effectively.

    Access and apply knowledge from all fields, skilled trades, technology,

    the Internet, sciences, arts and social sciences.

    LEARN

    Be ready to continue to learn for life.

    PERSONAL MANAGEMENT SKILLS

    The combination of skills, attitudes and behaviors required to get, keep

    and progress on a job and to achieve the best results using up-to-date

    technology (computer, Internet, presentation software), languages, self

    improvement techniques.

    Canadian employers need a person who can demonstrate:

    POSITIVE ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOURS

    Self-esteem and confidence.

    Honesty, integrity and personal ethics.

    A positive attitude toward learning, growth and personal health.

    Initiative, energy and persistence to get the job done.

    RESPONSIBILITY

    The ability to set goals and priorities in work and personal life.

    The ability to plan and manage time, money and other resources to

    achieve goals.

    Accountability for actions taken. No 'blame' syndrome.

    ADAPTABILITY

    A positive attitude toward change in time management, technological

    areas and new soft ware techniques.

    Recognition of and respect for people's diversity and individual

    differences.

    The ability to identify and suggest new ideas to get the job done -

    creatively through current equipment and programs.

    TEAMWORK SKILLS

    Those skills needed to work with others on a job and to achieve the best

    results.

    Canadian employers need a person who can:

    WORK WITH OTHERS

    Understand and contribute to the organize

    Understand and work within the culture of the group.

    Plan and make decisions with others and support the outcomes.

    Respect the thoughts and opinions of others in the group.

    Exercise 'give and take' to achieve group results.

    Seek a team approach as appropriate.

    Lead when appropriate, mobilizing the group for high performance.

    And I'm sure you'll need this later:

    THE COVER LETTER:

    PERSONAL, CONCISE, BRIEF.

    Paragraph One

    WHY I AM WRITING

    Paragraph Two

    WHO I AM AND A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO YOUR RESUME

    Paragraph Three

    WHY I CHOSE YOU AND WHY I LIKE YOUR COMPANY

    Paragraph Four

    CLOSE THE DEAL. ASK SPECIFICALLY FOR A TIME (WITHIN DAYS OR A WEEK)

    WHEN YOU CAN MEET TO DISCUSS ALL OF THIS FOR 'OUR MUTUAL BENEFIT'.

    And that's all I know.

     
  5. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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    When I worked for Nokia a few years ago someone came across the best objective description we'd ever seen. It contains lots of corporate BS and nonspeak, and sounds really important. Of course, we all stole it immediately, and I'll post it here:

    OBJECTIVE:

    To represent myself as an innovative leader who creates and maintains a productive and ethical work environment that focuses on business operational support and

    growth.
     
  6. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    If the DVD is paused...just press PLAY to resume.

    Brent L

    P.s. thanks Gui A that will help me out ALOT too.
     
  7. SteveA

    SteveA Supporting Actor

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    Carl - I was in your exact position seven years ago. I was a computer science student with no work experience looking to put a resume together. Employers understand that college students are going to have limited work experience, but it's important to list some relevant experience, such as major school projects and the like. It sounds like you have a pretty good foot in the door for a position. I'd advice attaching a cover letter explaining your desire to gain some work experience and outlining the strengths you have to offer.

    Believe me when I tell you, getting some real-world work experience will help you TREMENDOUSLY when the time comes for you to look for a job upon graduation. I took a part-time programming position the year before I graduated and it really helped set me apart from other candidates and land a pretty decent job - even though my grades were less-than-spectacular.

    Good luck!
     
  8. andrew markworthy

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    Is it for an academic post? If so, you should list all the subjects you've studied and (where applicable) your grades obtained. You should probably also at this stage in your career list your SAT scores, etc. Also list a couple of people who'd be prepared to give you a reference (at least one whould be one of your current professors - and remember to ask their permission first!).

    Try to put your achievements on separate lines - don't cram them into one paragraph.

    And stop apologising! So you haven't so far had a job - this isn't a sin! It's not as if you're having to record that you got kicked out of ten different universities or are currently wanted in 27 states, is it?
     
  9. DustinDavis

    DustinDavis Stunt Coordinator

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    FWIW, I do not recommend using an objective such as the one Tim has suggested. No offense, Tim, but as an experienced technology professional who has read his fair share of BS resumes and interviewed his fair share of BS prospects, especially technology ones, I can see through that crap like used Neutrogena. There's no sense in using puffery that is meaningless from a practical standpoint because it will just be discarded by the reader. That, or in response to an Objective like Tim's, I would ask the interviewee--"That sounds great! Can you give me a couple of concrete examples of how you plan on doing/implementing that?" If the response is only chirping crickets, your interview is over.

    One of the best things you can do when you do not have a lot to put on your resume is include a strong COVER LETTER. The cover letter allows you to sell yourself in a way that the resume does not, and also allows you to express personal enthusiasm for a position that the resume does not. Then practice your interviewing skills. Last, if you really want the job, pursue it, don't wait for it to come to you. Make follow-up calls, and be certain that your desire to have the position is known (without being annoying).

    Methinks that will take you a lot farther than an obtuse Objective statement.
     
  10. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

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    Carl,

    Ok, you've never had a job. Do you have skills, though? Highlight the skills you have. What computer systems do you know? What type of projects have you done? I care more about someone who has the skills necessary, than someone who has worked the fryer at McD's, or stocked shelves.

    Also, talk to your schools placement center. They work all the time with students trying to write resume's with no job experience.
     

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