Question about burned DVD's

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Richard Travale, Jul 31, 2005.

  1. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    A friend of mine made a movie (starring moi). Anyway, after the final editing and sound and all that jazz, we went to make a copy for the festival that he was going to enter this film in. We made the copy and threw it in my Toshiba SD 3800 DVD player to see how it looked on my display.
    Well, the disk is spinning and the player is loading up and A) it seems to be taking quite a while to load up...and B) it is really really noisy in the player.
    It sounds like it is scratching and just not playing nicely with the player.The movie finally starts but is not very smooth at all. It would jump, freeze a little and all sorts of things.

    So, I guess my questions are, do burned discs like this usually take longer to load and are they normally that noisy and finnicky? Or is it just that my Toshiba doesn't like non-commercial media like this?

    Any thoughts on this would be appreciated because I would hate to get the disk to the festival folks and have it not work properly, making my friend look like a bit of a schmuck.
     
  2. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    Its likely your player not reading the disc well. Some players just don't like X brand of disc while others seem to be able to read anything. My sony doesn't care what I toss into it but I had all sorts of issues with my panasonic and toshiba before that.
     
  3. Ronn.W

    Ronn.W Second Unit

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    It could be a damaged disc, or like Andrew Pratt said, you're player just doesn't like it. Put it in the computer and see how it plays. If it's OK, the disc is good.
     
  4. Paul D G

    Paul D G Screenwriter

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    Probably your player either not liking the disc, or not being able to play DVD recorables at all. My Sony won't even play CDRs.

    BUT certain brands DO work. I can play certain CDRWs and TDK DVD-Rs work great.

    See http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers and see what people are saying works in your player.

    -paul
     
  5. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    Also, consider that your player might not like the 'style' of media. There is a difference between DVD DASH R and DVD PLUS R.

    In general, DVD-R is slightly more compatible with players. +/- R is considerably more compatible with players than are +/- RW.

    Leo
     
  6. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    Andrew - the disk works fine on my drive on my computer so I know the disk is good.

    Paul - I have played cdr's before so I know that isn't it. I just checked that site you suggested and I see no reports on the media I was using. Maybe it just doesn't like the Fuji.

    Leo - I have tried both + and - and neither of them were spectacular.

    I think that I will try the recommended media on that site and see if I fare any better.
    Thanks for the help fellas.
     
  7. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    Another point: how was the disc coded?

    Many set-top players will not play sustaiend very high bit-rate discs, even though they're still within the DVD spec.

    If it was compressed to max bit rate, try getting the source-files recompressed to, say, CBR 7MBps or VBR peak at 8MBps. (constant bit rate vs. variable bit rate.)

    Leo
     

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