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OliverK

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That's all well and good for you, but - as it's been said multiple times - it's simply not Warner Home Video's policy on the matter. Never will be.

As Bob points out Warner is not 100% consistent and I would be surprised if they don't alter their more restrictive approach even more in the coming years.

Clearly it does not lead to many Blu-ray releases of movies from problematic elements that aren't selling in big numbers. Large format / big negative area movies and longer movies are also at an inherent disadvantage with such a policy due to the sheer amount of film processing that has to be done even if one isn't working from separations.
A 2+ hour long historical epic from the 50s or 60s that was shot in Warner, Eastman or Metrocolor will obviously be already at a big disadvantage compared to a 75 minute black and white b-movie from the same time period even if the elements of both movies are in good shape considering their age.

That being said we are not in a position to demand for Warner's policy to change but it cannot hurt to let them know from time to time that most of us prefer less than excellent over nothing at all for year after year.
 
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Tommy R

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The VHS is the only copy of TWWOTBG I have, and it looks horrible. Though I do hardly ever watch it, the only reason is because I have my VCR packed away. It's one of the last VHS copies in my collection not on DVD (I think The Nude Bomb will be the final VHS movie I own not released on disc, and I don't watch THAT one because it's a horrible movie, lol). I certainly want good PQ when watching movies, but I can still watch a VHS and get lost in the movie without thinking about that sort of thing.

I'll be happy to have the TCM recording on my DVR come October 1st, but I'd feel more secure in owning it on physical media. None the less, I can't wait to watch it since I'm sure it'll look better than my VHS.
 

Ken_Martinez

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As Bob points out Warner is not 100% consistent and I would be surprised if they don't alter their more restrictive approach even more in the coming years.

Hopefully, since their currently policy seemingly precludes anything made before 1954.

Even besides BROTHERS GRIMM, when was the last time they put out a B/W Academy ratio Pre-Code?
 

Thomas T

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Hopefully, since their currently policy seemingly precludes anything made before 1954. Even besides BROTHERS GRIMM, when was the last time they put out a B/W Academy ratio Pre-Code?

The Warners Archives are generously filled with B&W Academy ratio pre-codes. But if you're talking blu ray, c'mon, do you really believe there's a profitable market for B&W pre code films on blu ray?
 

Robin9

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What about the Bowery Boys series where a number of titles were released on the Warner Archive sets from subpar 16mm elements?
Were they DVDs or Blu-ray discs? Warner Archive is running two separate lines with two distinct philosophies. Their MOD (DVD-R) division pays little attention to picture quality, and I have several discs produced from very sub-standard elements. Their Blu-ray division is the opposite and seems to choose films whose elements provide the means to produce very high quality discs at moderate cost.
 

Ken Koc

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I guess BREWSTER MCCLOUD will sell many more copies than a blu of WONDERFUL WORLD OF THE BROTHERS GRIMM.<_<
 

TJPC

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This is why I can’t understand why people did not, and do not buy recordable DVD players. The last time I looked the Marantz copy I bought last was still available from Walmart on line. “Mother pin a rose on me”, but I have two of them and with TCM showing classic recordable movies, I have hundreds of discs I have made.

Sure they are only standard definition, but my collection now includes many many “only game in town” discs that have not made it to Blu ray, and many that have never even been put on DVD. I also have many more DVD-Rs of movies that I have recorded at a very modest cost that I would ever be able to afford to buy. This is not even mentioning TV shows like “Galavant”.
 

Ken_Martinez

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The Warners Archives are generously filled with B&W Academy ratio pre-codes. But if you're talking blu ray, c'mon, do you really believe there's a profitable market for B&W pre code films on blu ray?

I don't know. Is there a profitable market for Seven Brides For Seven Brothers or The Colussus of Rhodes?

Is there a profitable market for anything that's not recent or genre?
 

ahollis

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Warner’s has past sales numbers for titles sold on DVD and DVDr. I would suppose that those numbers are a major influence on what they release as WAC Blu-ray. I pretty sure they just don’t pull titles from the air.
 

Tommy R

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This is why I can’t understand why people did not, and do not buy recordable DVD players. The last time I looked the Marantz copy I bought last was still available from Walmart on line.
Is this essentially a VCR but for DVD's? If so I had no idea such a thing existed. I will definitely look into this.
 

Thomas T

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I don't know. Is there a profitable market for Seven Brides For Seven Brothers or The Colussus of Rhodes? Is there a profitable market for anything that's not recent or genre?

While the market for "classic" films is certainly dwindling (and probably at an all time low), musicals (especially in color) and peplum still have their fans (though at this point in time, perhaps cult is a better word) and along with horror and sci-fi have respectable sales. Pre-code B&W films? I seriously doubt the money invested in restoring them to acceptable HD quality (what's the point if they are only marginally better than their DVD counterparts) would reap much profits on a blu ray release.
 

Ken_Martinez

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While the market for "classic" films is certainly dwindling (and probably at an all time low), musicals (especially in color) and peplum still have their fans (though at this point in time, perhaps cult is a better word) and along with horror and sci-fi have respectable sales. Pre-code B&W films? I seriously doubt the money invested in restoring them to acceptable HD quality (what's the point if they are only marginally better than their DVD counterparts) would reap much profits on a blu ray release.

That's assuming all of them would take the mammoth effort to put out as Brother Grimm.
 

cinemiracle

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This is why I can’t understand why people did not, and do not buy recordable DVD players. The last time I looked the Marantz copy I bought last was still available from Walmart on line. “Mother pin a rose on me”, but I have two of them and with TCM showing classic recordable movies, I have hundreds of discs I have made.

Sure they are only standard definition, but my collection now includes many many “only game in town” discs that have not made it to Blu ray, and many that have never even been put on DVD. I also have many more DVD-Rs of movies that I have recorded at a very modest cost that I would ever be able to afford to buy. This is not even mentioning TV shows like “Galavant”.

I have a video to dvd and also a dvd to dvd recorder but never use them any more. I got rid of all my videos years ago.If I want to make a copy of a dvd or bluray then I just use my computer which can also copy from bluray to dvd and that includes double layer discs. Much simpler than using 2 recorders linked together. My programme also removes regional coding. Its all for free which is a bonus.Only have to pay for the blank discs.
 

TJPC

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My DVD recorders are used exclusively for recording on air programs, each having a hard drive for editing. If it seems likely that the show will be put on disc commercially, I use DVDRWs so they can be reused. For things like all the musical numbers from the Tony awards — which I have back to my Beta days, I make permanent discs.

I also use my computer to make DVDs, but need to buy a new set up for Blu ray to DVDr.
 

RolandL

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But that's just on the first few scenes, right? That was my understanding.

TCM broadcast


US Laser Disc
 

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