Is there a way to hook my computer sound to my receiver?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Lanny_B, Oct 4, 2002.

  1. Lanny_B

    Lanny_B Second Unit

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    Actually, here's specifically what I'm wondering:
    How can I play Xbox and mp3's from my laptop at the same time? I've grown very attached to playing my own music in the background of games, and since not all games let you do it in game, I wanted to arrange in manually.

    Is there a way to output the sound from my computer to the receiver, and have the Xbox sound going through it at the same time?

    BTW, I just got an Onkyo SR600 receiver yesterday, so I'm trying to see if this is possible.
     
  2. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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    Yes with about 15 bucks and a trip to radio shack I think you could pull it off. If you use the standard composite outputs on the xbox: 1. Get 2 Y-RCA adapters 2. Connect both the lefts to one of the adapters. 3. Connect both the rights the same way. 4. Plug them in according.

    That should give you sound from both from the same source input one your reciever.

    I know it's really hap-hazard, but I hope it helps,
    CaseyLS
     
  3. Geno

    Geno Supporting Actor

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    Lanny, I used to do what Casey suggested all the time. it helps if you can control the volume for both sources so you get the right mix of sound effects/music. but yes it does work that way. I got to the point where I had my father build a box that had 2 inputs and you could flip a switch and either signal or both signals would come thru depending. really neat. definately not audiophille but great for what you are trying to accomplish.

    geno
     
  4. Scott Falkler

    Scott Falkler Second Unit

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    Here's how I have mine set up. I use the 5.1 inputs on my Yamaha RX-V2095 to send different sources to specific speakers. I have the Video games hooked up to an external Dolby Decoder that outputs to the main, center and sub inputs of the Yamaha, and my PC (for MP3s) to the rear inputs. The front stage contains the gameounds, and the rear speakers contain the music. This way I can adjust the front/rear balance easily.
    It's a little more complicated, but I seem to like things complicated...!
     
  5. Lanny_B

    Lanny_B Second Unit

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    One of the first, more obvious snags I run into is that my PC speakers have a different kind of connection than my Home theater speakers. I just have a standard audio out jack on my laptop that's your basic headphone-type jack (I don't know what that's technically called, but they're common). It doesn't automatically have composite outs. So, is there a way to convert the signal from a "headphone" out to a composite in?
     
  6. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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    Yeah you can get standard headphone to RCA jacks. I have them laying all over the place. They're cheap.
     
  7. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    The headphone jack is what is commonly known as "1/8th inch stereo phone". This connector on the laptop is female, so you need the male version to plug into it.

    So, You need a cable that goes from 1/8th inch stereo male to a pair of male RCA cables. Radio shack carries these for about $5 (cat #42-2551 or 42-2550)

    Be careful however- as it is possible to do damage to your receiver (and speakers) with excessive level from your laptop. The best rule of thumb is to usually leave the master volume in the same position where you normally listen to CDs and adjust the level output on the laptop until it is about right.
     
  8. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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    when I try to listen to music from my computer through my reciever I have to really crank it up to hear anything, It's not even loud when it is at max volume. Any suggestions?
    -Casey Stoddard
     
  9. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Try double clicking the volume control in the system tray- it will give you individual levels for microsoft's sound mapper. There should be a specific level adjust for WAV audio (this should also control MP3 playback levels). Make sure this level is turned up.

    -V
     
  10. CaseyLS

    CaseyLS Second Unit

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    Okay I tried that and it didnt work. Then just to check I hooked up my portable minidisc using the same jack and all and it worked the same way. COuld there be something wrong with my cables?
     
  11. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    You statement is ambiguous, and could be read in two ways. By this do you mean:

    "I connected the computer to the minidisc using the same cables, and just like connecting to a receiver, it yielded low level output (it worked the same way it worked before)."

    or

    "I connected the computer to the minidisc using the same cables, and using this same configuration the minidisc worked fine. (it worked when using the same way)."

    If neither the receiver or the minidisc connection worked properly- it could be a number of things:
    1) Make sure you're coming out of an OUTPUT for the device (not an input or a mic jack)- and an output for the MAIN speakers (not surround speakers if your device offers these).
    2) The cables could be bad- or could be incorrect types. Are you using a 1/8th to RCA cable- or some other connection type? Is the male 1/8th inch connector stereo or mono?
    3) Have you ever used this output on your computer for other devices- like headphones or powered computer speakers? If so, did those work properly?
    4) Have you made sure that wav volume control, the master volume control, and the volume control in your playback application (winamp for example) are all at the correct levels? Have you tried turing all of them all the way up?
    5) Do you have multiple audio devices in your machine? If so, you might need to select the proper output from window's multimedia settings.

    -Vince
     
  12. Will Orth

    Will Orth Stunt Coordinator

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    Well i would suggest getting a mixer and send that output to your receiver, there are many out there for $50-$200 that will do the job. i did the same thing years back had a mixer in my Van with a guy playing Guitar with the same song driving down the the beach front in OceanSide, CA. it was a blast!

    think the one i stil have is a newmark/lexmart? or somthing close to it, it is in storage.

    Very easy to do! you may have to convert some 1/4 jacks to RCA is about it.
     

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