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Windows Full Ranged Speaker (1 Viewer)

Badies

Grip
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Feb 2, 2017
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17
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Michael
So I have a very unique temporary setup for my home theater. I currently run all my movies off of my computer (which performs all of the receiver's tasks). Before anyone tells me to go and buy an actual receiver, just let me say that that is my long-term plan, but for now my PC will have to suffice. For video, an HDMI is obviously all I need to hook up the projector, and for audio, I have an external 5.1 sound card.

Both the front left and right speakers are on their own stereo amp, as well as the rear two and the center. The sub is active. The sound card works quite well for 5.1 audio as each amp's input is connected to it. My issue arises when dealing with bass management on the PC. I managed to find a good piece of software that lets me set the crossovers for each channel at whatever I want them to be (currently set for 80Hz as that is the THX standard), however it does not enable me to displace the lower frequencies from the FL, FR, C, RR, RL to the LFE channel, merely eliminate them from going to those channels.

I don't know how big of a problem this actually is as I am unsure the frequencies mixed into those channels are ever <80Hz. This seems controversial from what I have read, although likely that the full range (20-20000Hz) is technically utilized in every channel. Therefore, I feel like I would cover all my bases if those signals were sent to the LFE channel. This leads me to my question about the windows "Full Range Speaker" selection. I am aware that this option, when checked, sends the full range signal to the Channels listed. That being said, when it is unchecked, it sends only the signals above a certain frequency (I have heard 70Hz).

Does this mean that the signals below this mark are sent to the sub, or just eliminated like my software does already? If it sends the frequencies in the other channels below a certain mark to the sub, shouldn't I just un-check the boxes and forget about my crossover software as windows will essentially be doing the same thing + redirecting all the bass to the sub woofer? I know this is a seemingly rinky-dink way of performing a crossover, but would it actually work? Is there a better solution to all this that won't cost me an arm and a leg and perhaps could be done through my PC, or is it fine to just have the crossovers left as is within the software?
 

Dave Upton

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If you are using an audio mixer in your sound control panel, you can set crossovers to route content to the correct channel. What media player are you using?
 

Badies

Grip
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
17
Real Name
Michael
VLC. The software I am using is called Equalizer APO.
This is what I have everything set to. The sub plays the LFE channel as well as all the other channels -10db. the center and front/rear left/right are all crossed over at 80hz via a high pass filter (the sub has a low pass filter at 80hz).
1.png
2.png
 

Sadanorakman

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Apr 3, 2017
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6
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Craig
I was contemplating going down a similar route to you... I've used a PC for home media for the last 15 years (with a DVB card in it as well for terrestrial TV). Back then it was particularly good for playing anamorphic PAL DVD's through an XGA projector, as the vertical resolution scaled pixel-perfect. I've always used an AV amp for the audio though. Since then I've been through several PC's, A few sets of speakers, at least three receivers, a 720 projector, and now a 1080... I'm trying to resist the temptation to move to 4K just yet!

My current thinking was that I want to go to atmos 5.1.4, but my current (Non-Atmos) amp is only four years old, and is really well built (Onkyo TX-NR818). It was worth a grand back then, and I can't really justify spending the same to renew every time new audio standards come out. I was thinking if I used a couple of sound cards, and four stereo amps, or just use the line-ins of my existing receiver, then it would be great to do the audio decoding within the PC instead. The problem is that there is just not the software available for Windows or Linux to do the decoding beyond a basic DTS or Dolby track. I believe there is nothing that will do any of the 'newer' audio standards: atmos, dolby true hd, DTS Master... Maybe someone should start an open-source software project to decode all this stuff say by using a GPU, and then driving sound cards from it.

I know I can do room correction in the PC with REW software, but trying to get all the audio decoding to work reliably could be a nightmare.

I know you don't want to be told to buy a receiver, but I guess that realistically there is a very good reason to hand off the audio processing to a dedicated piece of hardware, that will just take whatever bit-stream you throw at it, and decode it accordingly!

Maybe the biggest problem is the receiver/amp manufacturers being so driven by a 12-month model cycle... forced obsolescence... I'd happily pay to have atmos decoding software installed into my existing amp, instead of having to replace the whole thing. Maybe its DSP processors are not optimized enough or fast enough to do the decoding, who knows.
 

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