How to fix a stereo amp's kaput LED?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Kane, Jul 14, 2001.

  1. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    I have to say that when my Technics 65-watt stereo amp's LED went dark last year, it did me a big favor. I unplugged it and started down the HT 5.1 path that I'm on today with you all.
    I cud see the amp readouts in the dark screen but the backlight was out.
    Now it might be nice to resurrect the old amp for something. But I've never attempted a DIY on an LED. Is this a simple 30-minute job for an electronics repair shop? (I haven't asked anyone yet) or a simple plug-in at home? The amp is from the mid-80s.
    bill
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    [Edited last by Bill Kane on July 14, 2001 at 12:11 PM]
     
  2. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    My LED blew on my sony receiver. Turned out it wasn't really the LED that blew but pretty much everything inside shorted out causing the fuse that controls the LED to pop.
    So in my case the blown LED was the least of my problems. It might be worth it for you to take it to a repair shop and get a quote (check to see how much they charge for rejecting their quote first).
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    Good... Bad... I'm the guy with the gun.
     
  3. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    yeah, the repair shop is closed today. I'll go in Monday and pay their open-it-up-and-see charge, I guess. thx
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  4. Rick P.

    Rick P. Stunt Coordinator

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    This could be a light bulb instead of an LED. They used to slide inside a coloured translucent plastic cover which then pushed into a hole (same thing you'll find in the dashboard of a lot of cars). If it's a light bulb you could replace it in a few minutes - they simply push into a base. If it's an LED the fix will take about 20 minutes and you can easily do it yourself if you have a soldering iron.
    If you choose to change an LED yourself you should know that many don't have any kind of markings on them. You might have to buy two or three different LED's that will fit to determine the wattage of the original (no biggie - you can buy an assorted pack for about $2).
    Rick
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    [Edited last by Rick P. on July 14, 2001 at 04:15 PM]
     

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