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Finally upgraded my camera strap (1 Viewer)

Patrick Sun

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I did end up picking up a BlackRapid dual strap, which has become a godsend at events. The only thing I have to remember to do is turn off my flash on my left camera while walking around because it bangs into my thigh and flash button gets hit every now and then and sets off the flash. Hee hee.
 

dmiller68

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I have been looking at the DLC Carry Speed camera strap as well since I'm using the one that came with the camera now.
 

Patrick Sun

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For the price, the DLC Carry Speed strap is a good value. When I only tote one dSLR around, I use it, and it's pretty sturdy (it can handle the weight of my 5D2, with a 580EX II flash and GFong collapsible light dish thingamajig on it, and a battery grip).
It'll save a lot of neck strain, and/or awkward strap wrappage around your forearm if you don't have the dSLR hanging around your neck.
 

Citizen87645

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I usually have issues with unequal weight loads on my shoulders, so I've avoided sling bags and, by extension, sling straps. I've been curious about them though, so I went for the QuickStrap that is one-third the price of the other options from BlackRapid and CarrySpeed. The construction is plenty sturdy and the operation is smooth, so the question now is how my shoulders will feel about it.
 

Scott Merryfield

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I have not been in the market for a camera strap for quite a few years, as I've been transferring my Tamrac neoprene strap from camera to camera as I upgraded bodies. However, with finally buying a second body instead of selling my old one, I needed another strap for the new Canon 5D3. I picked up an Op/Tech and am very pleased with it. I lugged the 5D3 around at the zoo last weekend with the Canon strap since the Op/Tech had not arrived yet, and I had forgotten how uncomfortable the Canon-supplied straps can be. The Op/Tech is a little better built than the Tamrac, and is very comfortable, distributing the weight of the body very well.
Now I need to find a dual body solution. The BlackRapid dual strap looks intriguing.
 

Citizen87645

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But I've got the fuzzy side of the velcro on the inside. :)


I've used an OpTech wrist strap up to now, but could relate to the issues described in the linked article. Since I use a small bag as a holster anyway, this seemed like a more suitable pairing.


I won't know if I like it (and the general concept) until I try it in real world use. So far it seems feasible, at least for a 10 oz. point and shoot.
 

Patrick Sun

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I have a wrist strap from Optech as well, but I still prefer to just attach my EOS M to a Carryspeed single sling strap. With the wrist strap, it still was getting in the way of things when I wanted to move my right hand for non-camera-related activities while it was on my wrist. LOL!
 

Citizen87645

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Yeah, I think the wrist strap creates a false sense of mobility. With the finger strap it's just there (but not in the way) if you need the extra security and putting the camera in the bag is the actual action to take if you want to do other things. We'll see how that plays out though.
 

Scott Merryfield

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I go strapless with my EOS M, as I am usually slipping it in a pocket and any strap would make that difficult.

I am looking for a shoulder strap to use when walking around with my 100-400L II. I am not thrilled with the idea of fastening a strap to the tripod mount, as required by Black Rapid's solution. I may try an Optech, as I already use their neck straps.
 

Citizen87645

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The tripod mount would be more at the center of gravity though. I've done it with the 70-200 f/2.8 IS and felt comfortable with it over using any connection point on the camera body.


EDIT: And it occurred to me you actually may want to use the tripod mount...to mount on a tripod! :D


If that's the case, Peak Design makes plates that fit different tripod heads and the plates have a D-ring in the base. You can use that to connect a Black Rapid sling strap, if you really need to go with a Black Rapid sling. Otherwise, it would probably make more sense to go with a standard camera body neck strap.
 

Sam Posten

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Scott, seriously nothing touches the Black Rapids. I wouldnt waste my time with anything else. They screw on fast to the lugs and easy on easy off. Safe and secure, never had one come loose, the rubber gasket works a trick to lock em in. And yes, I have the Peak system too as I backed them on kickstarter.
 

Scott Merryfield

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Sam, I am not worried about the Black Rapid coming loose. Instead, I like to keep an Arca Swiss plate on the body most of the time for tripod use, and have been considering moving to an L bracket, which I would prefer to leave permanently mounted on the camera. I am not sure how that would work with BR, since it also needs that tripod socket that I am already using.


I guess I could use a Black Rapid just for the 7D, as that camera has been regulated to be used only as a wildlife camera with my 100-400L, which has a separate tripod ring and Kirk arca-swiss compatible foot installed, so I do not have a plate on that body. However, I usually take my 5D3 + 100-400L to the zoo, and that camera is the one that would also have an L bracket. I know I can always take the bracket off and install the strap, but I've never had to mess with disconnecting and reconnecting straps and plates in the past. I would prefer a simple, permanent solution. The Optech neck straps I'm using are comfortable when I have lighter lenses, but I've been draping the neck strap over my shoulder when carrying a camera with the 100-400L, as the added weight can be uncomfortable to carry around the neck for longer walks/hikes. It works, but it will slip off my shoulder occasionally.
 

Sam Posten

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Most arca swiss plates have a tripod screw underneath them at the bottom. I screw my black rapid into swiss plates and L-brackets 100% of the time.
 

Scott Merryfield

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Interesting, Cameron. I tried a lens swapping pouch at one time and found it very cumbersome to use. This looks like it may work better.


Looking at this old thread, I can offer an update -- I did end up buying a Black Rapid strap, which I use exclusively with my Canon 7D2. That camera only gets used with my two telephoto lenses -- 100-400L II and 70-200 f/4 IS -- so not having the tripod socket on the body available is not a big deal. The 100-400L has its own tripod mount, and I only shoot handheld with the 70-200 f/4 IS.


While also not a camera strap, I did buy a Spiderholster Black Widow to use with my Canon EOS M. It has come in handy while hiking in Yellowstone and bicycling on Mackinac Island, allowing me to hang the camera from my regular belt and have quick, easy access.
 

Citizen87645

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I've tried various pouches over the years. I think they work OK while providing some protection. But I've also moved away from using them for the most part in favor of a sling strap for my primary camera and a Peak camera clip on a belt for a secondary camera and lens.


Next month I'll be photographing a birthday party in the evening, so I'm looking at a lot of bounce flash photography. I don't really want to carry two cameras with strobes on them, so am looking at ways to make a single camera with occasional lens swaps a little more efficient. I may just use a pouch again, but the cumbersome part is usually what to do with the lens you've just removed. I'm not entirely sold on the idea of the flipper since you have to line up the marks to attach the lens, whereas with a waist pouch you can just drop the lens in and grab the other without having to be perfect about it.
 

Citizen87645

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Looks like Peak has its own version of the flipper, but it's more like a rotator. I think for going on a belt, Peak's is a better way to go. With the flipper clip, you are forced to remove the second lens from an upside down position, semi-blind. With the Peak's, you have the choice to grab the second lens from the underside, or rotate to the top and then remove.





Still, I think there are benefits to a belt bag these types of devices don't provide.
 

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