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few questions (1 Viewer)

Ronneil Camara

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Dec 2, 2002
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235
hey guys, sorry, I don't know where to post this question.

I've got some few questions
1. What is soundstage?
2. What is the difference between bipole and dipole speakers?

Thanks.

Neil
 

Ronneil Camara

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Dec 2, 2002
Messages
235
hey guys, sorry, I don't know where to post this question.

I've got some few questions
1. What is soundstage?
2. What is the difference between bipole and dipole speakers?

Thanks.

Neil
 

Mike SJ

Supporting Actor
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
718
soundstage - the stereo image of the music as how your brain percieves it. its best if your speakers are calibrated and equidistant from listening position of course. Listen to Pink Floyd's Brain Damage, sounds will pan left and right and all over the place. close your eyes and start pointing where the sounds come from. theoretically the area between the speakers is the soundstage, but when you start to hear ppl talk about their speakers being 'invisible' they mean that the sound stage doesnt stop at the speakers, or in other words, when you close your eyes, you cant pinpoint your speakers but you can pinpoint sounds coming from them.
 

Mike SJ

Supporting Actor
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
718
soundstage - the stereo image of the music as how your brain percieves it. its best if your speakers are calibrated and equidistant from listening position of course. Listen to Pink Floyd's Brain Damage, sounds will pan left and right and all over the place. close your eyes and start pointing where the sounds come from. theoretically the area between the speakers is the soundstage, but when you start to hear ppl talk about their speakers being 'invisible' they mean that the sound stage doesnt stop at the speakers, or in other words, when you close your eyes, you cant pinpoint your speakers but you can pinpoint sounds coming from them.
 

jephdood

Stunt Coordinator
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Feb 5, 2004
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Real Name
Jeff
Yup. And speakers that have a larger or "better" perceived soundstage can be placed further apart from each other and still mantain a pretty seamless left to right transition. Speakers that are too directional would leave a large gap in the middle. If you have a good soundstage, you can obviously differentiate between the left and right channels, but your brain should also sense sound coming from the middle as well.
 

jephdood

Stunt Coordinator
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Jeff
Yup. And speakers that have a larger or "better" perceived soundstage can be placed further apart from each other and still mantain a pretty seamless left to right transition. Speakers that are too directional would leave a large gap in the middle. If you have a good soundstage, you can obviously differentiate between the left and right channels, but your brain should also sense sound coming from the middle as well.
 

ChrisWiggles

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
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1) The soundstage, was roughly described above, but when you close your eyes listening to a really good setup, you can place instruments and elements of the sound left to right, and their sizes, and also very important, their depth front-to-back. Sometimes you can also hear some slight spacing top to bottom, but the major elements of the "soundstage" is how "large" it is in relation to the speakers, how tightly things are imaged within that space, and where they are placed in that "stage."

If you listen to a really good setup, turn off the lights and close your eyes while listening to some well-recorded natural jazz and such, and you can hear the space of the recording location, and where things are placed in it. A good natural test is the Buena Vista social club, very big space, you can hear all sorts of things in that. Orchestral is also usually pretty good, though IMO more difficult to do right. If you get a chance to hear a really good setup, listen for these things, and try to hear what your setup sounds like too.
 

ChrisWiggles

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
4,791


1) The soundstage, was roughly described above, but when you close your eyes listening to a really good setup, you can place instruments and elements of the sound left to right, and their sizes, and also very important, their depth front-to-back. Sometimes you can also hear some slight spacing top to bottom, but the major elements of the "soundstage" is how "large" it is in relation to the speakers, how tightly things are imaged within that space, and where they are placed in that "stage."

If you listen to a really good setup, turn off the lights and close your eyes while listening to some well-recorded natural jazz and such, and you can hear the space of the recording location, and where things are placed in it. A good natural test is the Buena Vista social club, very big space, you can hear all sorts of things in that. Orchestral is also usually pretty good, though IMO more difficult to do right. If you get a chance to hear a really good setup, listen for these things, and try to hear what your setup sounds like too.
 

ChrisWiggles

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
4,791
Oh yeah, I forgot to answer #2 :b

2)bipole: has speaker drivers on opposing sides of the speaker enclosure operating in-phase. So, when one pushes out of the box(creating + pressure), the other does too. So they sort of "work together" though if you think in absolute space, they are moving in opposite directions.

Dipole: same configuration, but this time out of phase, so when one moves out, creating + pressure, the other moves in creating - pressure. You can visualize this as them both moving in tandem, but on opposite sides of the box again. Dipole would create a null(moreso with the bass) on the axis between the drivers. Dipoles are morecommon in surrounds, since the are placed beside the listener, with the drivers pointed front and rear usually, which points the null at the listener, so very little sound is reaching the listening position directly from the speaker, but rather from the room creating a larger sense of ambience.

Something like a electrostatic panel speaker by nature would be a dipolar speaker.
 

ChrisWiggles

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
4,791
Oh yeah, I forgot to answer #2 :b

2)bipole: has speaker drivers on opposing sides of the speaker enclosure operating in-phase. So, when one pushes out of the box(creating + pressure), the other does too. So they sort of "work together" though if you think in absolute space, they are moving in opposite directions.

Dipole: same configuration, but this time out of phase, so when one moves out, creating + pressure, the other moves in creating - pressure. You can visualize this as them both moving in tandem, but on opposite sides of the box again. Dipole would create a null(moreso with the bass) on the axis between the drivers. Dipoles are morecommon in surrounds, since the are placed beside the listener, with the drivers pointed front and rear usually, which points the null at the listener, so very little sound is reaching the listening position directly from the speaker, but rather from the room creating a larger sense of ambience.

Something like a electrostatic panel speaker by nature would be a dipolar speaker.
 

Ronneil Camara

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Dec 2, 2002
Messages
235
Hey,

Thanks for everyone who responded. So if you were to choose for surround speakers, bipole or dipole?

Did I miss any other type of speaker other than bipole or dipole?

Thanks again.

Neil
 

Ronneil Camara

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Dec 2, 2002
Messages
235
Hey,

Thanks for everyone who responded. So if you were to choose for surround speakers, bipole or dipole?

Did I miss any other type of speaker other than bipole or dipole?

Thanks again.

Neil
 

ScottCHI

Screenwriter
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Messages
1,292
YES, you did. normal monopole or direct radiating speakers. and that's my recommendation for surround speakers. good ol', plain ol' speakers.
 

ScottCHI

Screenwriter
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Messages
1,292
YES, you did. normal monopole or direct radiating speakers. and that's my recommendation for surround speakers. good ol', plain ol' speakers.
 

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