component versus s-video

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by MikeHodges, Apr 7, 2004.

  1. MikeHodges

    MikeHodges Auditioning

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    I have an infocus x1 projector that comes with a component to s-video adaptor for video input. I have heard that component input is inherently better quality because it is split into 3 signals etc. My video source has both component and s-video outputs and I havent bought the cable yet.

    Do I buy the component cables and use the converter or save money and just run s-video? The projector is 25 ft from the video source (regular satelite box and dvd player). Thank You
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    I'm not familiar with the x1, but doesn't it take component video directly? I think I discussed this with someone once, it takes VGA (RGB) and component on the same input, I think it also comes with a VGA adapter because it takes component via that input(i.e. both RGB on the regular VGA input, or component via the same input with an adapter, with no transcoding to RGB)? I don't think it has any adapter for s-video, that would require transcoding between the two, which I'm pretty sure is not the case.
     
  3. MikeHodges

    MikeHodges Auditioning

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    Thank you Chris,
    You are correct-sorry- component to VGA. I assume this is preferable in terms of picture quality to S-video input. Any comments?
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Yes, S-video cannot carry high-def. Don't know, I don't think the x1 is high def anyway? you should use component video into the x1. The adapter, while it changes it into a VGA plug (again by memory, I think this is what I recall figuring out for someone), is not changing the signal at all to RGB. It remains component, and is input as such, just via a VGA plug. Hope that helps!
     
  5. MikeHodges

    MikeHodges Auditioning

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    Thanks again- definitely helps me decide what I need. The projector is SVGA but I still don't want the rate limiting factor to be the cables. This is my first post and I appreciate the prompt reply and good info. Beats the "deer in the headlights" blank stares I get at the local "AV specialist" store.
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Good RG6 coax is better for long runs (although people have done SVideo for 25-45 ft with no apparent problems).

    While SVideo would be cheaper, there is something about future-proofing your system with a good component cable that is attractive.

    Visit one of the custom sites to find a good price on HD rated cables. (Just because a cable is "component", does not mean it is rated for HD video signals).
     
  7. ZoranM

    ZoranM Stunt Coordinator

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    Just to add to this, I have an Epson S1 which is fairly comparable to the X1. I used a 25 foot svideo for about a week from my dvd player and from my xbox and I was very impressed.

    But after reading up some more and knowing I wanted to buy an HDTV compatible cable box I bought a 25 foot component to vga cable (made with RG6). After connecting that new cable and seeing the difference in quality on both the dvd playback and the xbox, I would never go back to svideo.

    Also after watching super bowl in HD using my new HDTV capable box, I wouldn't have it any other way.

    (of course this is all only my opinion)

    cheers,

    Zoran
     
  8. Dean T

    Dean T Auditioning

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    Well there's a mix up here...

    I have an Infocus 4800 which is basically the same thing as the X1. What you need is the adaptor for the X1 that takes a component line and changes the end over to the s-video hook up. This will give you the 480p picture out of your DvD player that regular S-Video cable won't.

    Why you ask?? Hehehe!!

    Well the adaptor from the Comp-to-S-Video isn't your standard S-Video plug. The standard S-Video plug has only 4 pins that are used to transfer the video input. The Component adaptor that Infocus sends with their 4800 has 7 pins which are used to send the extra RGB information that the component cable sends. THAT will get you the HD image you're wanting.

    True the X1 and 4800 aren't "TRUE" HD units... they will take the 720p and 1080p signals and scale them to it's native format (800X600), but honestly the difference between 600 and 720 is minimal visually IMHO. And right now there aren't any DVDs with 720 or 1080 resolution on them anyway.

    I would run the component HD cable.
     

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