"Blockiness" in part of Monsters, Inc.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Blair Lee, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. Blair Lee

    Blair Lee Agent

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    Just to recap, I've got a Panny 53WX42 mated to a Panny CP72 progressive scan DVD player. I'm playing Monsters, Inc. in widescreen and with progressive playback.

    In the scene where Sulley first opens the door to Boo's room, the door shows some blocky artifacts while it's being opened. The blue shades are definitely not "smooth;" instead, I see some blocks of color that shift as the door is opened.

    Is this a simple TV brightness/contrast setting? I used the THX screens to set those controls, but perhaps it's a smidge too bright. All the reviews I've read of this DVD call it a true reference release, so either I'm being overly anal about the video or I need to fiddle with a setting on my TV (more likely).
     
  2. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Try using the AVIA DVD. I think that is what you are talking about and that can be used as a reference.
     
  3. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    How big are the blocks? Just curious.
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I think it was Monsters I was watcing in a computer store where I saw blockiness on one large TV (a Pioneer RPTV) but not on several smaller ones. All were playing the same show. I was going to suspect it was inferior electronics in the TV. I wasn't there long enough to examine how the equipment was connected up.
    The graininess looked like blocks 2 scan lines in size, or comparable to dot crawl on analog video that went through an inferior comb filter. Unlike dot crawl, the graininess extended into solid colored areas as opposed to just at the edges.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  5. Blair Lee

    Blair Lee Agent

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    The blocks are not that big; I don't have an easy reference to tell you just how big without going home and measuring. They remind me of the "blocks" you might see during a DirecTV broadcast, but obviously smaller and much more subtle. Really, had I not focused my attention entirely on that door, I wouldn't have noticed it.

    Speaking of comb filters and such, what's the best way for me to set these things on my TV? Should I turn off ALL the filters? I've already turned off SVM and set noise reduction to ON (which apparently turns off the appropriate filter on my Pan 53WX42).
     
  6. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    The blockiness I saw did not appear to be the result of a comb filter; DVD video does not rely on comb filters unless you use the yellow composite video jack to hook up the player which is for convenience only and far from the best.

    A comb filter (or more generically a Y/C separator) must be used somewhere when viewing composite video including NTSC broadcasts and some of digital cable's channels.

    To not use the comb filter in the TV, connect up the DVD player via S-video or component video.

    If you use the S-video output from a cable box or dish receiver, channels that are composite video have to use the comb filter in that unit which may be worse that the comb filter in the TV.
     

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