Basic wall building and permit questions

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by brentl, Feb 16, 2006.

  1. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    Hi folks;

    1

    Of all the people that have built custom HT's how many of you have gotten proper permits for the electrical work??

    I've checked ,and I'm OK with the physical structure. As long as I'm not dealing with the structure, a premit isn't required.

    I'm really worried about the cost for the required 3 inspections for electrical work, I've only budgeted a maximum of $3000 for the whole thing in an 11' by 16'(18'?) space.

    Does anybody have any idea on the cost for the inspections?? I'll be calling Ontario Hydro soon, but if the inspections are $100+ each time that puts a real bite in my budget.

    2

    OK, I'm wondering whether there is any reason to build the structure ON the concrete wall?? Can I just build the wall as close to the cinder block as possible and not deal with adhering the studs??

    I am looking at building the walls on top of my Dricore, can I get away with sliding the dricore up to the wall and having a free standing wall with only the insulation touching the cinder block wall??

    Seems weird I know, but the little things have me stumped.

    Thanks for the help.

    Brent
     
  2. drobbins

    drobbins Screenwriter

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    #1 Whats a building inspector? [​IMG]
    #2 My walls are nailed into the floor and the ceiling joists. The block walls were too irregular to attach to. I glued the sheet-rock along with the screws so I don't think the 2x4s can move or warp.

    Dave
     
  3. David Noll

    David Noll Stunt Coordinator

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    The inspector won't know to inspect if you don't tell them you did anything!

    No need to attach wall to block. Just attach the bottom to concrete and top to floor joists. I would NOT place wall on Dricore.

    David
     
  4. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    Actually Dricore suggests this as a way to do it,that plus in means I'm square.

    What about insurance if I have a problem with the electrical?? Just make sure I use a good electrician??

    How do I know that type of Circuit breakers I need?? does it say something on the box??

    Thanks folks.

    I know nuthing NUTHING!

    Brent
     
  5. RickRO

    RickRO Stunt Coordinator

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    Brent

    Typically if you are not changing the actual structural elements of your residence ie moving load bearing walls foundations that kind of thing you are "usually" ok with the building part.

    IMO it pays to have the electrical work either done by a professional or if you DIY your own wiring the have a professional come in and inspect that. Wiring is one of those things that if you try to "cut corners" it could come back and bite you. Besides if you talk with a electrician he should be able to give you guidance on what type of circuit breakers to use etc. etc. etc.

    On the walls if not securing to the wall they do need to be secured to the top and the bottom to lend support to the wall.

    I believe that the reason that Dricore recommends that you build the wall on top of the product is that if it is blocked by a wall it cuts down on the effectiveness of their product....well that my guess anyway.

    FWIW I plan on using Dricore and I am not going to build my walls on it, but will be butting up against the walls, but then I don't have a damp musty basement either, mine is dry.



    Don't think that just because you build on this surface it will be square. The only way to make sure is as you build to take measurements. Learned that the hard way!:b
     
  6. Dan_Morez

    Dan_Morez Agent

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    Building walls on top of the dricore will save you from buying pressure treated lumber too.
     
  7. KenA

    KenA Stunt Coordinator

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    Make sure you have a vapor barier between the concrete walls and stud walls (especially if you want to insulate). If you don't, you'll have serious moisture and mold problems down the line. As for electric, you can wire it all yourself. Its a very good idea to get it inspected by an electrician before you put up your drywall. Don't cut corners. 12/2 for 20amp circuits. 14/2 for 15amp circuits.
     
  8. JeffCar

    JeffCar Agent

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    I too chose to do the wiring myself, but had an electrician come in to put in a subpanel, as I didn't have any circuits left in my 200amp panel. I broke it up and have four 20amp circuits to the HT room... 1 for lighting (all on spacer dimmers), 1 for 2 6 ft sections of electirc baseboard (220V), 1 for most for most of the room plugs, and another just to feed the equipment, as I have a Monster conditioner. All run with 12/2. It is certainly harder to run, but I felt safer.

    Although I used Dricore in the wife's craft room, I was debating its use in the HT room. I am going to be carpeting all but a small piece at the rear of the room which will be tiled. How can you attach carpet to it? Won't it buckle? Any advice would be welcome.

    By the way, I "solved" the vapro barrier problem with EPS - 1" thick attached to the concrete. I too have not had water problems in the 15 years since we built the house (knock on wood) but concrete does breathe.

    Jeff
     
  9. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    If I look at all my equipment I'm looking at around 1800 watts MAX, so 2 15amp lines should be enough for equipment. 1 for the major equipment running through a PF40 power conditioner. The other one for the smaller draw stuff, DVD player, vcr, and my 7 outlets.

    My third line(15amp) will be for lights, split for 6 wall sconces,and 6 pot lights(60 watt), +2 lights by the screen. The draw will be 840 MAX, on 2 dimmer,1 for the wall and screen lights, and 1 for the in ceiling stuff.


    Any input on outlets?? I'm thinking about every 8', so 7 oulets is enough, + the 2 dedicated equipment outlets at the front of the system.

    Brent
     
  10. JeffCar

    JeffCar Agent

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    My thought on power was to do a double set of plugs at the front of the room for equipment. Other plugs are spread around the room. Code around these parts has plug required every 12 feet, and I put slightly more, but kept it to a minimum to contain sound.

    Jeff
     
  11. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    I'm planning on running the 2-15amp circuits to 2 outlets for the equipment. 1 for the oultets and lights.

    Brent
     
  12. JamesP

    JamesP Extra

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    I am just finishing up my HT room and my computer room in my basement. (I'm in Alberta)

    I went with full permits for everything, electrical and building, my total cost was $108 with the inspection, and I am glad that I did.

    The inspector was really good and helped out with suggestions for running the small amount of HVAC that I had to do.

    I also had an electrician guide me through the electrical ( I did it, but I ran about 50000 questions by him before I did anything)

    I built my walls and put the dricore down after, using pressure treated and a rented impact drill. (Well worth the $15 rental fee). The pressure treated 2x4's weren't that expensive (I think around $5-6 for 8' opposed to $2.88 for 2x4's).

    But one thing that I would have done differently was to do the drywall before putting down the dricore, it is now full of drywall dust that will never go away. I am going to paint the dricore when I prime the basement, just to bind in the dust as much as possible.

    Inspectors also help out alot in the wife approval rating. If your house burns down and insurance turns you down because of unpermited electrical, she might be a little more then angry.
     
  13. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    Hey James,are you saying the 3 trips for inspections for the hydro guy cost you only $108 TOTAL for all three??

    I did a quick look, and it seems they charge about that for every inspection.

    Ill end up building ON the dricore, seams a little easier.

    I've also decided NOT to build me front speakers into the front wall, but I am going to do that with the rears.

    Brent
     
  14. JamesP

    JamesP Extra

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    Alberta is a little lax on its home building rules and I only required 1 inspection. As well, I only had to get the permits after I did the basic framing (all non-load bearing).

    I then got the construction and electric permits, did the electrical and had the inspection.

    During the inspection, the inspector said everything was good, but gave some suggestions that would help with the HVAC. His only complaint was that I had wired the theater room with regular speaker wire, and that I had to replace it with fire resistant speaker wire. He DID NOT have to come back to check that it was done.
     
  15. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    Yeah, I'm guessing I need something from Rona or HD that is FT code rated. I think the stuff HD sells is FT2 rated.

    In Uxbridge(45minutes from T.O.) there is no permit needed for non load bearing walls, but electrical is required. Even though I think I'll skip it.

    Brent
     
  16. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
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    jeff, i was wondering what was the price range for that bit of work.
     

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