5.1 receiver w/ 6 channel input

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Terrance Gaines, Jun 7, 2005.

  1. Terrance Gaines

    Terrance Gaines Auditioning

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    I have an HK AVR 125 that is 5.1 (2003 model). It has a 6 channel direct input. Does that mean with an seperate amplifier, I can do 6.1?

    How does the 5.1 receiver process the extra channel?

    Or should I just buy a 6.1 receiver and be done with it?
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Without OUTPUTS (line level or speaker level) for 6 channels, you cannot get 6.1. 6ch inputs generally include the sub channel in the count: 5.1 is 6 channels.

    If you want 6.1, a new receiver is the only way.
     
  3. John S

    John S Producer

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    What the other John said...

    5.1 requires 6 channel input. (5 channels and the sub as the 6th)
     
  4. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Ooh, how I hate this terminology. Although many use "5.1" to refer to Dolby Digital, soundtracks using this technology have up to six channels-- Left, Right, Center, Left Surround, Right Surround, and LFE. Thus, a multichannel interface, used perhaps, to connect a DVD-Audio player to a preamplifier has 6 RCA's.

    In the digital realm, a LFE channel contains about a tenth as much information as the other channels, thus "5.1". But this does not mean that a speaker capable of reproducing the LFE is unimportant--many feel that a subwoofer, far from being dispensable, is absolutely essential for good sound.

    In the very early days of THX EX, some people, reluctant to buy yet another amplifier, dug out old their old prologic sets, hooked the Ls and Rs to the inputs, set it for "Dolby 3". and obtained an approximation of the Center Surround channel.

    However, technologies have improved over the years. One cannot take full advantage of DTS-ES discrete using this trick, as it is a true 6.1 format, and besides, Neo:6, ProLogic IIx and Logic 7 are said to be better technologies for faking those Cs channels.

    6.1 recievers are said to produce undesirable psychoacoustic effects, and two speakers, even if they reproduce the same material, are said to reduce these effects. Having said that, I have a 6.1 reciever that I'm perfectly happy with-- although Onkyo has seen fit to replace it with a 7.1 model this year.
     
  5. Terrance Gaines

    Terrance Gaines Auditioning

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    So a 6.1 receiver should be enough?

    I won't suffer from upgraditis If don't automatically jump to 7.1?
     
  6. John S

    John S Producer

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    6.1 and 7.1 are still essentially the same.

    Put two rear speakers on your back center channel, separate them some and you are probably more than 98% the way to a real 7.1 system.


    People that have tested this, seem to confirm this.
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    A 7.1 receiver can be configured to run in 5.1 and 6.1 also. IMO, you won't suffer.
     
  8. FeisalK

    FeisalK Screenwriter

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    IMHO you'll suffer from upgraditis whatever you do. [​IMG] only question is when, see. doing 6.1 now, you'll probably start wondering about 7.1 soon. going straight to 7.1 will delay it. Anyhow most new (2005) receivers are 7.1

    Case against 6.1 - even though its the same mono signal matrixed out etc etc a single channel surround back might localise the sound and be a little bit disconcerting compared to two channels. 2. it's hard finding just one speaker to prop up the surround back. 3. getting 2 speakers and wiring them in series will halve the impedance (note to self: gotta check this) to a point where the amp might not be able to properly drive it - most receivers are rated for 6Ω to 8Ω. 4. going 6.1 and then upgrading to 7.1 might be a more expensive option in the long run

    Is there a huge fiscal difference between the 6.1 that you're looking at, and the 7.1 receiver?
     
  9. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    The location of the rear speaker relative to your seating position has a big affect on whether you will have the "localizing" problem. If you have your couch right up against the wall, a single rear center isn't a good idea. If you have a lot of room behind you, then a single one is probably good enough. My previous setup, the rear center was 4 feet behind me and blended perfectly with my surrounds. I never had any problems being confused that the sound was coming from the rear, nor localization (proper positioning and calibration will take care of localization).
     
  10. Terrance Gaines

    Terrance Gaines Auditioning

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    Thank you all for your help. I am moving into a new house next month, and want to get an idea of equipment I need (if any)

    My sofa won't be up against the back wall, so I will have some space. My HT area is not that big either.

    But, I will have to run wires through attics and such, so I am trying to figure out do I need to wire for additional speakers, even thought I don't THINK I will need them...I am pretty sure that is an entire thread by itself.
     

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