No more Blu-ray players from Samsung

Despite the big announcement of the opening of its Experience Stores this week – and with notably less fanfare – Samsung told Forbes magazine that it will discontinue the manufacture of Blu-ray players for the US. A Samsung spokesperson also confirmed to CNET that “Samsung will no longer introduce new Blu-ray player models in the US market.”

With the shocking story last year that Oppo was leaving the field, followed by a recent Nielsen survey citing Blu-ray and DVD players as a tech that was “in the declining phase,” the news does not bode well for collectors of shiny discs and the means by which to play them.

Samsung did not specifically reveal its reasons for leaving the product space, but our readers will have noticed that HDR10+ and Dolby Vision features were conspicuous in their absence from its recent offerings.

Physical media sales have continued to decline for some years now, and UHD titles only currently account for 5.3% of sales, as opposed to DVD’s 57.9% of the total disc market. Streaming services have also gained momentum with Apple and Google selling 4K movies at the same price as 1080p titles, and Amazon has recently lowered prices.

Samsung had been working on a new high-end UHD player for release this year, but it appears that this model will also be ditched.

Published by

Martin Dew

editor

114 Comments

  1. Even though my next 4K player will not be a Samsung and I might be getting a regular blu-ray player for a 2nd bedroom. The news of Samsung and Oppo both discontinuing disc players is concerning and is not good news for those of us who want our media on disc. I honestly do not want to buy content that I can not hold in my hand and that can be pulled from service due to a number or reasons including going out of business.

  2. So I suppose the next product from all the manufactures will be stupid streaming boxes to go with there home theater receivers or will that just get added to the receiver itself?

  3. I’m not going to panic just yet. When other manufacturers also announce they are discontinuing production of Blu-ray players, I’ll go out and buy three or four players to last me out.

  4. Robin9

    I'm not going to panic just yet. When other manufacturers also announce they are discontinuing production of Blu-ray players, I'll go out and buy three or four players to last me out.

    Now that's what I call future-proofing; and I'm with 'ya Robin9, but I won't give my money to Samsung for doing this.
    Sony, someone…please stand by, hold firm and don't go leaving us.

  5. I've been using a Samsung BD-E5900 3D WiFi Blu-ray Disc Player for years and like it so much I've had a spare in my closet for years too. Now I wonder if I should buy ANOTHER spare. My wife tolerated the first spare player with a roll of her eyes, but she might have me committed if I buy yet a third one…

  6. I regret selling my Oppo DVD player when I got my Oppo BD player. There was nothing wrong with it, and although I rarely used it, it wouldn't have been a bad idea to keep it around as a backup.

    I still have my first BD player, which was a Sony from 2008. It's not hooked up anymore, but I keep it around because it has the analogue component outputs in addition to HDMI and I figured it didn't hurt to keep that capability. I have an older SD 16×9 projector from around 2006 and that's still in working order, and they're basically a pair at this point – I'm happy to loan out the combo for weddings, backyard barbecues, etc. They're holding up very well too.

  7. Robin9

    I'm not going to panic just yet. When other manufacturers also announce they are discontinuing production of Blu-ray players, I'll go out and buy three or four players to last me out.

    I have a spare player or two around here, but if another company goes out of the player business, I'll buy a new one as a final back-up. I have far too great an investment in discs not to be sure to have a means of playing and enjoying them.

  8. Carabimero

    Has this development made anyone second-guess investing any more money in blu-ray discs?

    No way. I have so much invested in discs that I have to future proof myself (I still have an Oppo 4K sealed) with at least one more disc player.
    My issue is that when I need to use it, I will have a newer TV down the road and by then televisions probably won't support HDMI. They will probably have no inputs at all for external hardware. Just a super smart TV that can sync up with any other device of the future. No cables needed.

  9. Carabimero

    Has this development made anyone second-guess investing any more money in blu-ray discs?

    It's still possible to find working laserdisc and Beta players, so it's not something I'd worry about.

  10. Carabimero

    Has this development made anyone second-guess investing any more money in blu-ray discs?

    The only thing this announcement has done is to get me to golfclap Criterion's decision NOT to jump into the UltraHD bear trap.

  11. Carabimero

    Has this development made anyone second-guess investing any more money in blu-ray discs?

    (Long rant).

    My decision was made years ago, for slightly different reasons than the one you mention. I curtailed my movie bluray disc purchasing when I came to the realizaton that there's less and less new computer bluray-r drives being brought to the market. (This is in addition to coming to the realization that most bluray movies I buy, have very little to no rewatch value for me).

    In the case of computer bluray-r drives, it turns out there's only two manufacturers left: LG and Pioneer for both generic bluray and 4Kbluray. Pioneer seems to be hemming and hawing more as time goes on, where Pioneer doesn't even have own dvd-r drives anymore. (PIoneer now just rebadges a generic LG dvdr drive).

    The other big thing which led to my curtailment of buying bluray movie discs, is that some technical features of LG computer dvdr/blurayr drives are really nasty. There's a feature called "jamless play" on LG drives which basically returns back all zeros or garbage random data whenever the LG dvdr/blurayr drive comes across an unreadable defective bad sector on a dvd or bluray disc it is reading. This was an engineering decison which is a completely broken design from the start, and absolutely unacceptable to me.

    If I can't precisely check that there's any bad sectors on bluray discs, then there's no point in doing any more "blind buys" of movie blurays. This LG "jamless play" function will fool you into believing a defective bad sector is actually a "good readable sector". Basically it gives an extreme false sense of security that a disc has no random bad sectors due to manufacturing defects.

    A properly designed computer dvdr/bluray-r drive will return back a "read error message" whenever it comes across any unreadable sectors on a dvd or bluray disc. Before they were discontinued altogether, LiteOn and Samsung computer bluray-r drives did this properly.

    Since my Pioneer computer dvdr/bluray-r drive is somewhat slower than my LG blurayr drives, nowadays I only buy movie bluray discs which I am willing to watch within 24 hours or so after purchase. (It takes around 30-60 minutes to check a dual-layer bluray disc on my Pioneer computer bluray drive).

  12. Josh Steinberg

    I regret selling my Oppo DVD player when I got my Oppo BD player. There was nothing wrong with it, and although I rarely used it, it wouldn't have been a bad idea to keep it around as a backup.

    I still have my first BD player, which was a Sony from 2008. It's not hooked up anymore, but I keep it around because it has the analogue component outputs in addition to HDMI and I figured it didn't hurt to keep that capability. I have an older SD 16×9 projector from around 2006 and that's still in working order, and they're basically a pair at this point – I'm happy to loan out the combo for weddings, backyard barbecues, etc. They're holding up very well too.

    I still have, and use, my old Oppo 980H DVD player . I keep a TV show loaded, and we usually watch an episode while eating dinner. Right now we are watching The Partridge Family — this show did not age well. :huh:

    I just did get rid of my first BD player — a Sony from about the same era as yours. I gave it to my sister and her husband, who only had a DVD player. I still have two others (an older Panasonic and a newer Sony that I brought back from our South Carolina condo since we no longer use it down there). Plus I also have a Sony UHD player, and plan on eventually picking up another UHD player with Dolby Vision support. So, I should be set for quite awhile.

  13. I'm pretty confident there will be players available for years to come. They may not be made by the "major" name brands, but someone will make them. I saw a whole endcap of no-name DVD-only ๐Ÿ™„ players at Walmart yesterday for under $24. Then the studios wonder why people stick with DVD rather than upgrade to blu-ray or 4K.

  14. One thing that I was sad to see go was the dvd recorder. I still have my Panasonic dvd recorder and record stuff off my DIRECTV box. Unfortunately I will need to keep that receiver because the new ones don't have a s-video connection anymore and need that to get the best picture sent to my dvd recorder. You can still buy dvd recorders on Ebay but you will have to pay more for a unused one.

  15. Malcolm R

    I'm pretty confident there will be players available for years to come. They may not be made by the "major" name brands, but someone will make them. I saw a whole endcap of no-name DVD-only ๐Ÿ™„ players at Walmart yesterday for under $24. Then the studios wonder why people stick with DVD rather than upgrade to blu-ray or 4K.

    Wonder how much more the price of el cheapo generic dvd players will fall, when all the patents expire over the next several years.

  16. atcolomb

    One thing that I was sad to see go was the dvd recorder. I still have my Panasonic dvd recorder and record stuff off my DIRECTV box. Unfortunately I will need to keep that receiver because the new ones don't have a s-video connection anymore and need that to get the best picture sent to my dvd recorder. You can still buy dvd recorders on Ebay but you will have to pay more for a unused one.

    They're also great for transferring tape based home video memories to disc. I hope that my Toshiba DVD Recorder doesn't conk out anytime soon!

    CHEERS! ๐Ÿ™‚

  17. JQuintana

    May get to the point of "Buy any DVD movie and get a player for .01 cent!" LOL

    This may sound really dumb.

    Every time I buy a large dvd set (such as a compelte series tv show dvd set), I'll frequently buy a new computer dvdr drive to rip the set. Nowadays a new computer dvdr drive is around $20 a pop or less.

    One of my side hobbies is investigating the behavior of new dvdr drive models, even if it is just a firmware update or a more recent manufacturing date (or even made at a different factory).

  18. JQuintana

    May get to the point of "Buy any DVD movie and get a player for .01 cent!" LOL

    This may sound really dumb.

    Every time I buy a large dvd set (such as a compelte series tv show dvd set), I'll frequently buy a new computer dvdr drive to rip the set. Nowadays a new computer dvdr drive is around $20 a pop or less.

    One of my side hobbies is investigating the behavior of new dvdr drive models, even if it is just a firmware update or a more recent manufacturing date (or even made at a different factory).

  19. Tony Bensley

    They're also great for transferring tape based home video memories to disc. I hope that my Toshiba DVD Recorder doesn't conk out anytime soon!

    I found it somewhat surprising that some dvd recorder devices consisted of just a generic computer dvdr drive connected to a circuit board with several chips. (Dunno if the firmware was modified or not).

  20. Tony Bensley

    They're also great for transferring tape based home video memories to disc. I hope that my Toshiba DVD Recorder doesn't conk out anytime soon!

    I found it somewhat surprising that some dvd recorder devices consisted of just a generic computer dvdr drive connected to a circuit board with several chips. (Dunno if the firmware was modified or not).

  21. These manufacturers fly in the face of loyalty lacked. Yes, I get it; these groups are in the business of making money. Nonetheless, we first built up our libraries of DVDs. Then Blu Ray became obvious within its advancements of PQ; and so it was that we re-invested in our hardware products and re-purchased (or double-dipped) a voluminous amount of discs. And then it became 4K. Buy another display. Buy another player. And definitely re-buy the discs. Oh yes, they made their monies; but Samsung has left us at the alter. I, myself, will have a great deal of financial distrust towards that next wave of advancements and products. Will I marvel in that next great advancement? You bet. But it will be the longest of times; and of watching and waiting; to see if manufacturers will be sticking by us on our next round of commitments.

  22. Don't forget that none of these manufacturers forced people to double dip or jump from one format to another. Folks willingly opened their wallets and took some big gambles some of which they lost out on. You can't blame the studios or manufacturers or any other parties involved in the video/audio evolution.

  23. jcroy

    (Without getting heavily into politics).

    Without any "blood pact", I generally don't expect loyalty from anybody.

    True. But the 4K movement has essentially just gotten started.
    They did a lot to cultivate our attentions towards both the 4K players and the UHD discs;
    and just as we began to come around, the manufacturers began their packing.
    At least, with the DVD and BD movement, the access to players stuck around far longer.

  24. (This may sound really really stupid).

    If I were to "stockpile / hoard" anything related to optical discs, I would certainlty NOT stockpile any computer bluray drives. Especially any computer bluray-r drives made by LG.

    My reasoning behind this, is that a computer bluray-r drive is largely useless if there is no easy DIY way to decrypt the bluray discs (whether legitimate or "grey market").. The only free "easy" unencumbered bluray decrypting program, can only decrypt discs older than 2012 or so and are not made by 20th Century Fox. (Fox uses BD+ which such "free" programs cannot handle immediately).

  25. PMF

    They did a lot to cultivate our attentions towards both the 4K players and the UHD discs;
    and just as we began to come around, the manufacturers began their packing.

    Personally I was largely "immune" to this cultivation (via 4Kbluray propaganda), though for a very different set of reasons.

    A number of years ago I read some leaked Sony documents on wikileaks, which outlined an updated AACS2 drm system which appeared to be for use on a successor to bluray discs. It turned out this sucessor was 4Kbluray discs.

    One provision which was an immediate vote of "no confidence" for me, was that AACS2 had a version where the decryption keys are not stored on the actual physical 4Kbluray disc. Such discs required an internet connection to connect to an online server where the decryption keys are stored. Any 4Kbluray discs which uses this variant of AACS2, would immediately become "coasters" if that decryption keys server was shut down.

    (It is currently unknown if there are any 4Kbluray discs which used this variant).

  26. PMF

    True. But the 4K movement has essentially just gotten started.
    They did a lot to cultivate our attentions towards both the 4K players and the UHD discs;
    and just as we began to come around, the manufacturers began their packing.

    Part of the issue is that businesses also want immediate success and boffo results to impress their shareholders. They're not interested in slowly nurturing and building a market. If it doesn't take off almost immediately, they just abandon it and move on hoping to find the next big thing.

  27. Carabimero

    Has this development made anyone second-guess investing any more money in blu-ray discs?

    Like Edwin-S, I will continue to purchase Blu Ray discs for as long as they remain available.
    As a matter of fact, if monies weren't so currently tight, I'd be buying far, far more on this very day.
    Although I do not like this current news, this will not put a stopper on anything;
    for I plan to continue on with these pleasures and for as long as I am able to have their accesses.:thumbs-up-smiley:

  28. I've bought more BDs and UHDs so far this year than I bought all of last year. To be honest, I only read the Sammy announcement yesterday, and I haven't ordered any discs (yet) today…so it didn't affect me. What affects me is the high UHD prices in Canada, so I'm picky what I buy, but UHD prices seem to be getting much better this year, as the "industry" falters around them.

  29. I mentioned in the Round-Up thread that Walmart seems to have the new Robin Hood film on 4K for $19.96 and on blu-ray for $17.96. That's a negligible price difference that will get me to choose the 4K option over the blu-ray. When 4K is routinely $5-10 more, I'll choose the blu-ray.

  30. Josh Steinberg

    I regret selling my Oppo DVD player when I got my Oppo BD player. There was nothing wrong with it, and although I rarely used it, it wouldn't have been a bad idea to keep it around as a backup.

    My first Blu-ray player (a Samsung) stopped playing Blu's in 2016, but it still played DVD's fine. However, I unloaded this because I didn't have a lot of extra room for the player. Though, I now regret this & probably should have kept it as a back-up – just in case.

    Malcolm R

    I'm pretty confident there will be players available for years to come. They may not be made by the "major" name brands, but someone will make them. I saw a whole endcap of no-name DVD-only ๐Ÿ™„ players at Walmart yesterday for under $24. Then the studios wonder why people stick with DVD rather than upgrade to blu-ray or 4K.

    This is actually surprising to me, because I haven't seen a DVD-only player since around 2011-ish. Of course, I haven't looked for a DVD-only player since before that time, given that I bought my first Blu player in 2012. But, I agree that one of the reasons Blu has not penetrated the marketplace as much as we HD aficionados would like is because DVD-only players are still being sold.

  31. JQuintana

    Don't forget that none of these manufacturers forced people to double dip or jump from one format to another. Folks willingly opened their wallets and took some big gambles some of which they lost out on. You can't blame the studios or manufacturers or any other parties involved in the video/audio evolution.

    I can blame the bastards for dropping a format off of TV sets for which the costs were already sunk. Removing back compatibility with a format was bullshit.

    HD-DVD died but as long as my player works I can watch the discs. With 3D, if my old plasma dies I'm fucked to play my 3D discs unless I want to buy a projector. And who knows how long that support will last now that support for 3D home releases is completely ending.

  32. Blame away ๐Ÿ™‚ But jumping into a niche format was a bigger risk and it didn't pan out. We saw how 3D in theaters went during the early days (50's, 60's) it was basically a fad and never went 100% mainstream so you can't blame anyone but yourself for going all in when odds weren't in the formats favor from day 1.

    But yes, you can blame them all day long if it helps heal the sting.

  33. What a bunch of garbage. Laser disc was a niche format. I can still watch them if I want to. 3D is the only format that becomes completely unusable because it requires the display to be able to process them. Dropping that feature on TV sets, rendering the discs useless was crap. It is as simple as that.

  34. Yep, Simple as that. And it was a huge risk adopters of 3D took and it didn't pan out. They knew it wasn't most likely ever to going to survive full time mainstream. Can't blame manufacturers for a format that the public didn't embrace. Public spoke and the product failed and sadly adopters are taking the hit. It's just how it is.

  35. This isn't the same thing, but for what it's worth I never adopted the LD format, which IIRC was in it's heyday back in the late '80's/'90's. One of the many reasons was that at the time, as a high school/college-aged student I just didn't the money it took to buy an expensive player & also expensive disks (very rarely were LD's available for rental). And, since LD never really penetrated the marketplace to any great extent, obviously others felt the same way.

  36. JQuintana

    Yep, Simple as that. And it was a huge risk adopters of 3D took and it didn't pan out. They knew it wasn't most likely ever to going to survive full time mainstream. Can't blame manufacturers for a format that the public didn't embrace. Public spoke and the product failed and sadly adopters are taking the hit. It's just how it is.

    I'm getting my final word in too. Claiming that people who bought into 3D knew the format wouldn't last is just another false assumption on your part.

    People buying 3D discs in no way had foreknowledge that the format would be dropped by TV makers.

  37. Wow. The day it hit the market myself and at least 2 other friends of mine who have "home theaters" said right then and there that this wouldn't last too long. I can't believe anyone thought that 3D at home was going to be a lock forever. It was fun gimmick but not sustainable at home.

  38. PMF

    These manufacturers fly in the face of loyalty lacked. Yes, I get it; these groups are in the business of making money. Nonetheless, we first built up our libraries of DVDs. Then Blu Ray became obvious within its advancements of PQ; and so it was that we re-invested in our hardware products and re-purchased (or double-dipped) a voluminous amount of discs. And then it became 4K. Buy another display. Buy another player. And definitely re-buy the discs. Oh yes, they made their monies; but Samsung has left us at the alter. I, myself, will have a great deal of financial distrust towards that next wave of advancements and products. Will I marvel in that next great advancement? You bet. But it will be the longest of times; and of watching and waiting; to see if manufacturers will be sticking by us on our next round of commitments.

    Yes. Canโ€™t add anything to this.

  39. The Drifter

    This isn't the same thing, but for what it's worth I never adopted the LD format, which IIRC was in it's heyday back in the late '80's – early/mid '90's. One of the many reasons was that at the time, as a high school/college-aged student I just didn't the money it took to buy an expensive player & also expensive disks (very rarely were LD's available for rental). And, since LD never penetrated the home video marketplace to any great extent, obviously others felt the same way.

    There is a big LD community out there right now that is championing the format. I wonder if it will make a comeback like vinyl. I use to salivate over the new LDs at Suncoast or Tower and hope that one day I would be in that niche group.

  40. I say keep streaming for the general market but keep the Blu Ray and 4K players for the niche. The thing is, these were never designed for the general market and were always for the niche. There will always be people that want the physical. Now I donโ€™t know what Samsungโ€™s reasoning was for this, but this sounds like the alarm that went off last year when Best Buy said they will no longer carry CDs, and people were like โ€œthat means CDs are now doneโ€ but no one looked at the bigger picture. I still buy physical music but donโ€™t buy it at Best Buy because of the selection. In Arizona and in Phoenix, Ziaโ€™s Record Exchange is packed every weekend with people buying CDs, Vinyl, and Blu Ray. New and used. They have a section for Criterion and Arrow discs. There is probably something more going on at Samsung

  41. JQuintana

    No way LD will ever make a comeback. Ever. It's so inferior to what we have now, not to mention inconvenient.

    VHS has a better chance of returning if that tells ya anything. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Yes. I miss watching Fiddler On The Roof pan and scan or worse yet, the first VHS edition of Woodstock. When they started to finally issue widescteen titles, rather belatedly, I was excited.

  42. Brian Husar

    There is a big LD community out there right now that is championing the format. I wonder if it will make a comeback like vinyl. I use to salivate over the new LDs at Suncoast or Tower and hope that one day I would be in that niche group.

    There's a lot more technical deficiencies in Laserdisc that makes it less appetizing than vinyl for revival.

    Also count yours truly as somebody that's still royally pissed that vinyl made a comeback in the first place. You know how cheap and easy it was to buy stuff 5 years ago compared to now? I mean really. Those effing kids had to ruin everything with their goddamn speculator boom. Trust me, you DO NOT want a revival if that's going to happen.

  43. JQuintana

    Yep, Simple as that. And it was a huge risk adopters of 3D took and it didn't pan out. They knew it wasn't most likely ever to going to survive full time mainstream. Can't blame manufacturers for a format that the public didn't embrace. Public spoke and the product failed and sadly adopters are taking the hit. It's just how it is.

    You are delusional. You bend your dislikes into some weird realm where you believe what you are saying as though it were fact. I know you don't know what you are talking about so let me summarize it for you (I'll try and keep it simple):

    3D absolutely did "pan out" and the reward is hundreds of 3D movies for people to enjoy at home…on disc…forever. 3D has lasted nearly a decade, and there still is no confirmed end to it as different studios continue to support the format. It did not fail.

  44. JQuintana

    Wow. The day it hit the market myself and at least 2 other friends of mine who have "home theaters" said right then and there that this wouldn't last too long.

    Right then and there huh? Well, tell your "home theater friends" that 3D is still going. I bet they will be very surprised that they were dead wrong.

  45. Bryan^H

    Right then and there huh? Well, tell your "home theater friends" that 3D is still going. I bet they will be very surprised that they were dead wrong.

    So to confirm, I can tell them to go ahead and run to their local Best Buy or Walmart or Target and grab a budget 3D TV which I guess there are several to chose from and a handful of 3D discs and enjoy? No need to jump through hoops, no need to order from overseas or any other things. All can be had plentifully at their local stores.

  46. Again anger is bubbling up with a couple of folks and we've strayed again (guilty as charged). So I say call truce and just stick to Samsung ditching discs and the consequences of their decision.

    I think it may sooner rather than later that at least one more major/minor player ditches their players as well. Could be within the next 1-2 years.

  47. Back on topic – the news doesn't really bother me, since I'm not impressed by Samsung Blu players anyway. I got my one & only Samsung Blu player in late 2012, and it lasted until Spring 2016. At that point, it still played DVD's, but the functionality?! of the Blu laser stopped working. Not sure if I got a dud or not, but in any case I believe Blu players should last longer than just a little over three years.

  48. Edwin-S

    […]People buying 3D discs in no way had foreknowledge that the format would be dropped by TV makers.

    I agree with you, Edwin-S.

    JQuintana

    Don't forget that none of these manufacturers forced people to double dip or jump from one format to another[…]

    No, they didn't force us; but they certainly did seduce us.

  49. Worth

    It's still possible to find working laserdisc and Beta players, so it's not something I'd worry about.

    There has actually been a resurgence in Laserdisc collecting. On Facebook there is a huge group with a lot of people constantly buying large lots of Laserdisc and are always looking for players. Its a nostalgia thing and it sparked me to start viewing the laserdiscs that I still have left probably 1,000 out of an original collection of 2500. Its a nostalgia thing for the group and many of them are young and never originally owned Laserdisc. This illustrates how discs are never really going away at least not for many decades and why boutique labels selling blu rays should be around easily another 10-15 years. Used disc market will be around at least 30-40 years after they stop selling dvd and blu ray. The laserdisc used and unopened market is still going strong 20 years after the format ceased and laserdisc was never close to as big as dvd and blu ray.

  50. Bryan^H

    No way. I have so much invested in discs that I have to future proof myself (I still have an Oppo 4K sealed) with at least one more disc player.
    My issue is that when I need to use it, I will have a newer TV down the road and by then televisions probably won't support HDMI. They will probably have no inputs at all for external hardware. Just a super smart TV that can sync up with any other device of the future. No cables needed.

    I wouldn't worry about that either as someone will always comes up with adapters. So if HDMI is replaced with another connection type there will be a small box that allows several hdmi connections to be converted to the new type. If they change to no connections just blu tooth or some other link up there will be a box for hdmi connectors that can link up.

  51. Lord Dalek

    Have fun with your Danish clog–I mean Phillips player then.

    Or Panasonic, Mitsibishi, Onkyo, Pioneer, Sony, Sharp, Toshiba, Yamaha, etc. 2 companies ceasing to make players is hardly a reason to panic when there are a dozen more making them.
    Personally I don't like LG or Samsung product or trust it so neither is a loss to me.

  52. Mitsubishi is still in the A/V market?? I thought they left long ago. I was a diehard Mitsu fan back in the 70's and 80's. They were always considered the "premium" go to brand.

    Sadly Panasonic is also barely hanging on. They list one $500 4K player and just 1 cheap Blu player.

  53. JQuintana

    So to confirm, I can tell them to go ahead and run to their local Best Buy or Walmart or Target and grab a budget 3D TV which I guess there are several to chose from and a handful of 3D discs and enjoy? No need to jump through hoops, no need to order from overseas or any other things. All can be had plentifully at their local stores.

    Yeah, the flagship 75โ€ Sony which just stopped being manufactured in November of 2018. Still available at Amazon, and Value Electronics. If they order one tomorrow they will have it Tuesday of next week. And your friends being home theater enthusiasts must know about projectors which there are literally dozens of new and recent models that all support 3D.

    Iโ€™ll Stop arguing when you admit you have been spouting bullshit about 3D being a failure. You want a failure look at DIVX.

  54. Bryan^H

    Yeah, the flagship 75โ€ Sony which just stopped being manufactured in November of 2018. Still available at Amazon, and Value Electronics. If they order one tomorrow they will have it Tuesday of next week. And your friends being home theater enthusiasts must know about projectors which there are literally dozens of new and recent models that all support 3D.

    Iโ€™ll Stop arguing when you admit you have been spouting bullshit about 3D being a failure. You want a failure look at DIVX.

    why I can sleep at night. ๐Ÿ™‚ I'm getting ready to buy a house within 1 year or so and I won't buy a new couch, or a new table or a new ANYTHING until I blow money on a projector and all region 4K 3D player!!!

  55. Radioman970

    why I can sleep at night. ๐Ÿ™‚ I'm getting ready to buy a house within 1 year or so and I won't buy a new couch, or a new table or a new ANYTHING until I blow money on a projector and all region 4K 3D player!!!

    Awesome. Projection for 3D is amazing. You will love it.

    I brought my projector to my friend's house, and he has this huge white wall so we projected the movie at 180"…it was freaking massive. Now he is sold on a projector too, and he doesn't even have to bother with a screen as the picture looked absolutely fine.

  56. Bryan^H

    Awesome. Projection for 3D is fucking amazing. You will love it.

    Projection in general is amazing. I can't imagine ever going back to watching movies on a TV. And that's with an entry-level projector that cost less than many mid-size TV's.

    Watched Frozen 3D last night. Incredible picture with lots of beautiful 3D with all the ice crystals and such.

  57. I would love to have a gigantic screen to watch movies on but it is impossible with our set up. Too many windows, no good way to mount a projector or screen. Too bad projectors require so many factors to truly enjoy.

  58. I've seen projector set ups that have a bit too much light and they look pretty washed out. Now if it was pitch dark out and lights were out, yes they are stellar looking. But let's not try to trick folks into thinking you can just flip on a projector with the house lights on or when the room is sun filled and have a deep rich picture like you can with a standalone LCD/LED or similar TV. Ain't gonna happen.

  59. you guys are getting kickbacks I just know it!! lol I'll need a lot of help when I get around to shopping. My mom is saying get a small house, but I'm getting a big theater room with a house around it! My house now is such a shack. I need a lady who likes 3D too. So I'll be shopping around for that too! lol

  60. JQuintana

    I've seen projector set ups that have a bit too much light and they look pretty washed out. Now if it was pitch dark out and lights were out, yes they are stellar looking. But let's not try to trick folks into thinking you can just flip on a projector with the house lights on or when the room is sun filled and have a deep rich picture like you can with a standalone LCD/LED or similar TV. Ain't gonna happen.

    Your opinion, of course, which as usual does not apply to everyone no matter how much you think it should.

  61. Malcolm R

    Your opinion, of course, which as usual does not apply to everyone no matter how much you think it should.

    You are correct in that it's my opinion. Never said it applied to "everyone" But we all know that overall projector set ups are much trickier to watch than a tabletop TV set up.

  62. JQuintana

    I've seen projector set ups that have a bit too much light and they look pretty washed out. Now if it was pitch dark out and lights were out, yes they are stellar looking. But let's not try to trick folks into thinking you can just flip on a projector with the house lights on or when the room is sun filled and have a deep rich picture like you can with a standalone LCD/LED or similar TV. Ain't gonna happen.

    that's like when it doesn't look good in the store… what happened with Plasmas. Maybe people trying to watch 3D movies with 6 lights and summer suns coming through the windows is why 3D is having problems!!

  63. I don't think there are too many average Joe's went with projectors for their 3D viewing. The more hardcore diehard A/V fans like found on HTF went that route. Average Joe went with the $400 55" sets. So I doubt projector set ups played a big factor in 3D's mainstream failure.

  64. Malcolm R

    Projection in general is amazing. I can't imagine ever going back to watching movies on a TV. And that's with an entry-level projector that cost less than many mid-size TV's.

    Watched Frozen 3D last night. Incredible picture with lots of beautiful 3D with all the ice crystals and such.

    I watched Frozen 3D over christmas and it did pretty well with my samsung. The picture is incredible and the 3D jawdropping with a few crosstalks here and there. I find that when there is stuff that is too far forward or too far back it just doesn't work no matter how I adjust. I'd wondered if I paid somebody to set the colors up… I really think it would improve, or get myself some new glasses, I was seeing a little double vision last weekend before doing a 3D double feature including the first lego 3D movie.

  65. Malcolm R

    I have a small apartment and watch in my living room that has four large windows. There are no real barriers to projection unless you create them.

    Right.

    If you have the will you can make a projection set up nearly anywhere.

  66. Radioman970

    […] I was seeing a little double vision last weekend before doing a 3D double feature including the first lego 3D movie.

    4 out of 5 doctors agree that watching a double-feature will always lead to double-vision.:3dglasses:

  67. JQuintana

    Mitsubishi is still in the A/V market?? I thought they left long ago. I was a diehard Mitsu fan back in the 70's and 80's. They were always considered the "premium" go to brand.

    Sadly Panasonic is also barely hanging on. They list one $500 4K player and just 1 cheap Blu player.

    Looks like Sharp only makes 4K TV's and no disc players at all listed on their website.

    Looks like Pioneer only makes some high priced "Elite" model Blu only players and one mid range Blu. No 4K players listed on their site.

    Toshiba no longer makes any players or TV's it appears per their website.

    Yamaha only makes 2 players and they are just "upscaling" 4K, not true 4K.

    Onkyo no longer lists any movie disc players for sale on their site

    Sony right now is king of players. Many to chose from.

    But all have many players available with online retailers so I'm not sure what the point is hear. Most vendors have normally only made 2-3 different players. You can buy players from at least 10 different vendors with no problems and even if all the other vendors stop selling in a few years the overstock will be available for years after that. Sony Launched Blu Ray so they will continue making players for a long time. When they announce they are no longer making players then it will be time to panic but its more likely that streaming will evolve into something better before that happens.

  68. I didn't say you can't FIND the old outdated players floating around online. I'm just saying that many of the majors you listed as being current makers of players was to a degree invalid since many you listed don't make players at all any more. But if you want outdated or old tech players, you will always be able to dig one up somewhere.

  69. Three issues with projectors:

    1) The room needs to be light controlled.
    2) They use bulbs which need to be changed frequently if you want to maintain a decent level of light output. The bulbs are expensive.
    3) Black level. Blacks cannot even begin to approach those on TV sets, especially OLEDs.

  70. I agree. If done right and in a pitch dark and well laid out room, they look spectacular. But in say, someone living room with lamps on, light coming through the drapes or blinds, the experience falls a bit flatter.

  71. Edwin-S

    Yes. Projectors really are meant for dedicated media rooms. They are not really meant for casual viewers. They are really for diehard film fans that want to create that theatre feel at home.

    I do just fine with one in my living room with a pull-up screen. Nothing is wall mounted, nothing is permanently installed. The setup can easily be packed up and moved should we move.

  72. JQuintana

    Seems most of these gadgets are built to last 1-2 years sadly.

    Let's see, my Toshiba DVD player from 1998, 2002, and Sony 2006 are still going strong. My BD players from 2008, 2009 still play like the day I bought them. So yeah your 1-2 year estimation is spot on.

    JQuintana

    Too bad projectors require so many factors to truly enjoy.

    Yup. Plugging a hdmi cord from player to projector and projecting on a white wall or portable screen is mind numbingly complicated. Don't forget to turn off the lights.

    JQuintana

    But I thought projectors were the best and greatest with next to no issues? ๐Ÿ™‚

    They are the best, and greatest.

  73. You are totally right!

    I forgot I don't need to worry about finding the right type of projector, the correct mount, the right spot to put a projector, alignment of the projector. Don't need to worry about finding the right screen to get best picture since you don't buy a projector to shine on a wall!! Don't have to worry about finding right screen mount or right spot to mount the screen, nor worry about buying correct screen size.

    No need to worry about bulb issues, bulb costs, dimming of bulbs.

    It's literally take out of the box and plug it in to your 4k player ..oh wait the player is 15 feet across the room! oh well, no worries. Just take out of box and it's just plug and play and watch right then and there!

    So darn simple! Why isn't all of America using them I wonder?! Hmmm. Weird.

  74. Most people are not aware of how impressive a large, projected, image can be in a home environment. Also, unless a person is single, home decor is most often dictated by the woman and very few of them see any use or need for a media room or projection system. A lot of them cannot even stand the idea of a large screen TV in a room, let alone a projector and screen.

    And, yes, I agree that they are more complicated to set up than a TV. Most people are casual consumers of video media. They cannot even figure out or be bothered to set up their expensive TVs for optimal viewing. A projection system would be beyond them.

  75. JQuintana

    You are totally right!

    I forgot I don't need to worry about finding the right type of projector, the correct mount, the right spot to put a projector, alignment of the projector. Don't need to worry about finding the right screen to get best picture since you don't buy a projector to shine on a wall!! Don't have to worry about finding right screen mount or right spot to mount the screen, nor worry about buying correct screen size.

    No need to worry about bulb issues, bulb costs, dimming of bulbs.

    It's literally take out of the box and plug it in to your 4k player ..oh wait the player is 15 feet across the room! oh well, no worries. Just take out of box and it's just plug and play and watch right then and there!

    So darn simple! Why isn't all of America using them I wonder?! Hmmm. Weird.

    J. Respectfully, not sure why you can't just decide it's not right for YOU. Most would accept and understand that. I love my projector setup and dedicated room but it wouldn't bother me at all to learn others have different needs, restrictions or preferences.

  76. Edwin-S

    Three issues with projectors:

    1) The room needs to be light controlled.
    2) They use bulbs which need to be changed frequently if you want to maintain a decent level of light output. The bulbs are expensive.
    3) Black level. Blacks cannot even begin to approach those on TV sets, especially OLEDs.

    I didn't know that about #3. Now, I've never had a problem with dark levels in an actual movie theater.

    I always keep my windows cover, will get very dark curtains for a tv room and install dimmers to get it just how I want it. One rule I have is no eating or drink while watching 3Ds. Popcorn is okay but getting greasies on glasses in the biggest no no in my movie room!

  77. JQuintana

    You are totally right!

    I forgot I don't need to worry about finding the right type of projector, the correct mount, the right spot to put a projector, alignment of the projector. Don't need to worry about finding the right screen to get best picture since you don't buy a projector to shine on a wall!! Don't have to worry about finding right screen mount or right spot to mount the screen, nor worry about buying correct screen size.

    So you're saying you blind bought your 4k direct view streamer set with no prior research as to screen size or technology, plopped it on any handy table without considering where anyone sits, and never once gave a thought to setting it up with the correct picture settings to best display your content. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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