Y-splitters instead of switcher for component??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Sean Laughter, Jun 2, 2002.

  1. Sean Laughter

    Sean Laughter Screenwriter

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    I was just wondering if normal RCA Y-splitters (2 female to 1 male) present any problems when wanting to attach two component sources to a TV?

    I know a switcher would probably be the best option, but I'm looking for something cheaper than a relatively expensive component switcher. Plus, I KNOW I'm only ever hooking up two sources (a Playstion 2 and a Gamecube) and this is only a 32" TV anyway. So, obviously, I'm not looking for the highest-end solution for a projection system or anything like that. I'm basically just wondering if there is any real problem with using Y-splitters for this application.
     
  2. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    Perhaps. I don't know what the impedances are like in video, but I assume they'd be arranged similar to how audio is arranged - outputs have low impedance, inputs have high impedance. If that's the case, you can use a Y-splitter to divide one output (source) between two inputs (destinations), but you cannot use one to combine two sources into one destination. Even if only one device is turned on at a time, this will probably not work. Let's say your PS2 is playing - it will try to "drive" the combined load of your TV and your GC, and since the GC's output impedance should be very low, this will be too difficult a load to drive, and will probably cause distortion of some sort.
    Of course, it's possible that video circuits work completely differently, in which case none of this is valid.
    Edit: It appears that other people have done this with no problems. Please ignore everything I said [​IMG]
     
  3. Lee Petty

    Lee Petty Stunt Coordinator

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    i have heard in some cases it can cause bad picture degradation. i always have "heard" to use a switch, but ive never really tried it though.
     
  4. TimG

    TimG Second Unit

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    Buy one of the passive Sony (or other brand) switchers. Instead of feeding it composite video/Left audio/Right Audio, feed it the three component cables. There have been several people report no degredation of the video signal and that it works great. Best of all they are only 15 to 20 bucks.

    TimG
     
  5. wei

    wei Auditioning

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    I have been using what TimG suggested for several months and there is no noticeable degradation in video quality. The passive switch I am using is a Sony SB-V40. I paid 40 bucks for the unit 5 years ago and it was put aside for a while until I needed to hook up two DVD players to my Sony 53HS30.
    At least give it a try and see if you can notice any difference.

    Wei
     
  6. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    I use Radio Shack 15-1952 A/V switch boxes to switch between multi-channel DVD-Audio and SACD for the one set of 5.1-channel inputs on my A/V receiver. With these switch boxes, I observe no sonic degradation, even when the DVD-Audio and SACD players are both turned on. The two boxes cost only $30. Before buying these switch boxes, I tried Monster Y-adapters and they did not work. The volume of the signals from either components was cut off, even if the other component was turned off.
     

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