widescreen help

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by SarahKathryn, Jan 16, 2005.

  1. SarahKathryn

    SarahKathryn Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have a small television, 16 inches, not widescreen. Since most DVDs are widescreen that's what I usually buy. The thing is I'm confused by all the versions. What is 16:9 widescreen? Is there a difference between anamorphic and 2.35 anamorphic? I've been through several different sites but I don't understand most of what is being explained. Can anyone explain the differences in plain english? Thanks so much, Sarah
     
  2. Lev-S

    Lev-S Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2003
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Do you find the same title in multiple versions? Most likely not so you have no choice on what version you buy, anamorphic or 2.35, or whatever.

    Even though the movie frame may be in one of half a dozen or so different shapes, or aspect ratios (such as 2.35:1) the DVD itself is optimized for just one of two screen or video frame shapes, 4:3 (letterboxed and/or not anamorphic and/or not 16:9 enhanced) and 16:9 (anamorphic or 16:9 enhanced). The DVD player also has just two screen shape settings, 4:3 for 4:3 only TV's, and 16:9 for TV's that can do both 4:3 and 16:9. The player in 4:3 mode does the right thing for all DVD's to give a good picture on a 4:3 TV.

    2:35 anamorphic and just plain anamorphic mean the same thing for a DVD except that 2:35 anamorphic tells you more about the frame shape of the movie contained within and just plain anamorphic does not.

    You should look for the word "enhanced" or "anamorphic" if 16:9 optimized is what you want. Because the specific numbers 16:9 refer to both a video frame standard and a (not very common) movie frame aspect ratio, "16:9 widescreen" can be ambiguous.

    You will almost certainly get a 16:9 TV or a 16:9 capable TV in the not too distant future. An anamorphic DVD will then give a much better picture than a non-anamorphic DVD of the same title.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm

    Video can be stretched to any shape you want if the TV will let you. It is the 16:9 mode on the DVD player that causes the video to be sent to the TV as-is and you adjust the TV to make it look good.
     

Share This Page