When will Manuf. offer 1080p I/Os on HD DVD-Players/TVs

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Paul A. Robinso, Jun 5, 2006.

  1. Paul A. Robinso

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    It is my assumption and I am not alone but why am I or any HD enthusiast to purchase either of the Blu-ray or HD-DVD players when neither outputs 1080p (1080p is the TRUE HD-format of which Both Blu-Ray as well as HD-DVD Software manufacturer are using, at least they (The Software Manufacturers have it right).

    I was an early HDTV comsumer (Mitsubishi WS-48511) along with several DVD-players I have purchased over the years.

    I think it is not smart to purchase (again) a HD-device that will be OBSOLETE in 1-2 years

    What do I mean................
    #1 Where are the 1394--Firewire I/O on any of the HD-players to be marketed this year.

    #2 I/You purchase any HD-Player or 1080p-HDTV(Except Model HP5880w) today (or even this year) and in 1-2 years the money spent will be for NOT.

    What no one is telling us is this............
    *This years HD-Players do not output 1080p resolution (but they will)
    *This years HDTV displaying 1080p, do not except 1080p(but they will)
    *The HD-DVD Software is developed/formatted at 1080p (of which is great)
    but on any HD-player you buy (or 1080p HDTV) this year or in the near
    future, will be down-res/converted to 1080I or 720p depending on what you
    will set your NEW HD-Player to.

    #3 Why would I or anyone want to throw thousands of dollars away on what in two to three years will not display a 1080p picture......(which is where the Home theater Manufacturer's will be in 2-years)

    I'LL wait until these devices output and accept 1080p.
    Until then I'll get by with my Mitsubishi and Progressive/480p DVD-player.

    Oh by the way, I would guess that over 50% of current Home theater owners, as I, do not have a HDMI input to display upconverted HD-DVD picture on.....

    I am simply informing others on my HT-research and waiting to be.....a smarter comsumer/purchaser...... I apologize in advance if this Thread should of been placed in the HDTV's forum..........


    If you think it is not true......do your research....and purchase all you want...
     
  2. TedD

    TedD Supporting Actor

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    Paul, You should stop confusing the 1080 storage and display formats of HD DVD and BD with the 1080 transport format on the wire.

    Even Sony's professional cameras and equipment use an INTERLACED format on the wire. In fact 24PsF is very popular in production studios simply because it can ride the same infrastuture as the standard 60I HD signal. Yes, 1080 24PsF is actually an INTERLACED transport between devices. The fact that the transport is interlaced in no way degrades the final progressive display as long as the two fields represent the same frame of the source and were sampled at the same time. This is, in fact exactly how both BD and HD DVD work. The data is stored as a progressive frame and the player has the option of splitting the odd and even lines of that frame and outputting them as two fields. One field contains the odd lines and the other contains the even lines. In other words, an interlaced signal on the wire.

    The player can also do field repeat processing to deliver a 60I fields from the original frame stored on the disc. Properly processing either of these interlaced transports to recreate the progressive frame in the display device is a trivial exercise than can be performed with no loss of resolution or detail, and without creating any artifacts.

    The key to this seemless reconstruction of the frame is that both fields have to come from the same frame and or have been captured at the same time.

    Obviously, sports and other 60I sourced video cannot take advantage of this, because the two fields that make up a frame have a temporal displacement from each other that leads to combing and other artifacts when being combined into a frame with a simple weave.

    But, when it comes to film or video sourced from professional cameras like the Cine Alta used for SW Ep I, the original source is clearly progressive, which allows interlaced transports to be used without ill effects (assuming that the display device wasn't designed by some brain dead designer who decided to convert 1080I to 540P by bobbing, rather than using a clean simple weave).

    Ted
     
  3. Paul A. Robinso

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    Do you have an answer to "When will Manuf. Offer 1080P (Progressive 60fps) HDMI Input/Outputs on their HD-Players or HDTV (................So....they can be compatible and I as well as others will not need to repurchase either device at a later date) ..............

    Thank you in advance,,, If you do not change the subject....to some other device........
     
  4. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    As I understand it, one of the reasons in delaying the launch of the Samsung Blu-Ray player was to ensure that it had a 1080p-capable output. Blu-ray players, therefore, will be 1080p from the outset.

    Surely someone will correct me if my impression was mistaken.
     
  5. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Firewire is nice, but it doesn't have the bandwidth for uncompressed video. Since most firewire sets don't have VC-1/H.264 decompressors, the inclusion of a IEEE1394 output would be for naught.
     
  6. Mark Butler

    Mark Butler Stunt Coordinator

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    FireWire can transfer data at speeds of up to 800 Mbit/s. A D5 tape used to make high definition masters has a data rate around 250 Mbit/s. Firewire has more than enough bandwith for HD using VC-1/H.264 compression codecs. The JVC D theater has a firewire connection on it that you can hook-up to your TV. The real reason that firewire is not being used is that it does not have an inherent DRM or copy protection. HDMI as we know does have an extremely robust copyright protection scheme. Firewire would be worse than analog for the Studios as its primary use is for making perfect clones or copies.
     
  7. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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