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What are some 4-ohm recievers?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Paul Seyfarth, Jun 29, 2002.

  1. Paul Seyfarth

    Paul Seyfarth Stunt Coordinator

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    I am looking for recievers that can handle 4-ohm speakers, 6 channel is a plus, and I can find for cheap online.
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    you really need to provide more information...what're your speakers efficiency...the room size...your budget.
     
  3. Joe Tilley

    Joe Tilley Supporting Actor

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    Paul, most receivers will handle a 4ohm speaker just fine as long as your not cranking the vol for hours.

    I know I will probably be starting something by saying this but I really think people get a little to carried away with the ohm thing. I have actually ran loads as low as 2ohm's on several receivers without ever having any trouble whatsoever. Keep a good fan on it & you should have no trouble.........
     
  4. Daniel Lindgren

    Daniel Lindgren Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree with Chu. And also with Joe, but all receivers/amplifiers are not created equal ... at "normal" listening levels most amplifiers can probably handle 4 ohm speakers.

    If you want reasonably priced (don't know what you mean by "cheap") equipment that can handle 4 ohm speakers, look at Rotel. They might be a bit too expensive though.

    I also think Harman Kardon would be a good choice, the AVR 520 is powerful and possibly in your price range.

    But ALWAYS listen before you buy, at home if possible!
     
  5. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    When it comes to dealing with lower impedence speakers (4 ohms or even lower), there are some things you can look for in a receiver that will improve your chances of getting a more robust unit.
    1. Cooling capacity.
    Look for lots of square inches of heat sinks. The more the better. If the unit has a fan, even better. And, no matter what you buy, give the unit plenty of ventilation. Don't stack ANYTHING on top of it.
    2. 4/8 Ohm switch.
    This can somewhat alleviate that need for quite so many square inches of heat sink. BUT, since the 4 ohm position lowers the amount of available output power (average amounts I've seen published range from say, 15 to 25%), you run a higher risk of causing amplifier clipping if you are playing the unit at high volume levels. Here is a thread I replied to earlier regarding the switch...http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...ght=Ohm+Switch
    3. Discrete output devices.
    Receivers that use discrete output transistors are more able to handle heat than the units that use integrated circuit "power packs", due to the discrete outputs having more surface area to disipate the heat they create. As an example, I recently replaced a 5 channel receiver in my 2nd system. I looked at 2 models, a Pioneer VSX-D711 and a Yamaha HTR-5550. While both sound excellent, the Yamaha has 10 output devices vs. the Pioneer's 2. The total output device's surface mounted to the heat sink of the Yamaha is noticeably more than the Pioneer's.
    4. Speaker "size" setting.
    With any multi-channel receiver, you can choose whether to run a speaker as full range (Large) or with the lower bass filtered out (Small.) If you run a 4 ohm speaker as Large, the amount of current drawn (and therefore heat created) is a good deal more than when the speaker is set as Small. So, when setting up your system, if you choose all of your speakers as Small, you can get away with lesser amounts of the three points above (although ventilation is still important.)
    Hope this helps!
     
  6. Jim_C

    Jim_C Cinematographer

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    >>While both sound excellent, the Yamaha has 10 output devices vs. the Pioneer's 2
     
  7. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Jim: I looked through the top vents at the heat sink. The Pioneer has only 2 fairly large "mega chips". The Yamaha has ten fairly standard output transistors attached to it's heat sink.

    Also, I had some ownership experience back in the 70's on IC "power pack" outputs. (And, it was Yamaha that had them back then.) Yamaha was trying power pack outputs because they are cheaper to impliment. The problem was that once these units were out in service, they had a higher rate of failure than what they expected. After just a year or so of trying them, Yamaha gave up on them for most/all of their products. And THE problem was heat disipation. I'm not saying that any brand that uses the IC outputs is bad or poorly contructed. But all else being equal, discrete output are ALWAYS better.
     
  8. Jim_C

    Jim_C Cinematographer

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    Thanks Chuck.

    Do you know much about the Denon line when it comes to these issues?

    While the website says that you can use 4 ohm speakers with a Denon I still hesitate just a little when I read the attached disclaimer. I hate to go against the recommendation of 6 ohms or higher but I really like the Denon feature set. As much as I love my Yamaha I'm starting to get annoyed at some of it's limitations compared to Denon.
     
  9. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Jim: Denon advertises that they use discrete outputs on their A/V receiver lineup. Some use fans (the 3802 for sure does) and others do not. Denon does not directly rate their receivers for 4 ohm loads, but one of the FAQs at the Denon website says that they can safely drive 4 ohm speakers.

    IMO, if you like things loud for long periods of time, and you're trying to drive 4 ohm speaker loads, and you're using a Denon receiver, then make sure it's got lots of ventilation. An external fan blowing air by the thing would not be overkill. (Of course, to be honest, this advice is good for nearly all brands...)


    Of course, if the budget can absorb it, the best answer is a separate amplifier. Most separates have less troubles in these areas simply because they don't need to be concerned with fitting a pre-amp/processor, tuner and amplifer into one chassis. The whole thing can be dedicated to just looking after the amplifier portion.

    In my case (in my main system), I run a Denon 3802 receiver as a pre/pro into a 5 channel amp. Heat buildup is not an issue.

    As for the receiver in the bedroom, it has the speakers set as Small and is never played overly loud . So it doesn't have any heat related problems either.

    Is this helping???
     
  10. Ferran Mazzanti

    Ferran Mazzanti Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,
    I'm driving a 4Ohm Mordaunt-Short central speaker with my Marantz SR6200 with no problem whatsoever. I believe lower models such as the 5200 or 4200 can handle them as well...
    But keep in mind what other say: ventilation is important. My gear does disipate *lots* of hot air (and I live in Spain where right this month we'been 30º Celsius average), but as long as I have nothing on top of the receiver, I can play it for hours without a single problem...
     
  11. Joe Tilley

    Joe Tilley Supporting Actor

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    Paul I have the Sony DA-5ES & all my speakers are 4ohm,I run a 4" fan on it & play it at high levels all the time without any trouble at all. Even after playing for a hour or more it hardly gets hot at all with the fan on,& my impeadence switch is set for 8ohm speakers.

    I really don't think you will have anything to worry about as long as you keep a good fan on it,& keep an eye on it the first few times you use it to see just how hot it is running. If you go after a fan you can pick one up at your local radio shack for about 20bucks if I remember right.The one I use is a 4" 120volt brush less case fan.
     
  12. Paul Seyfarth

    Paul Seyfarth Stunt Coordinator

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  13. Jim_C

    Jim_C Cinematographer

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    >>Is this helping???
     
  14. Tony Lai

    Tony Lai Stunt Coordinator

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    You need to step above the mundane like those weak Sonys, Onkyos etc.

    The S&V seems to be the bible for separating the weak from the 4 ohm capable.

    Look at H/K, NAD, Rotel, Denon.

    T.
     
  15. Joe Tilley

    Joe Tilley Supporting Actor

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    Ya know Tony, its stupid comments like that that get people pissed off.

    It kinda funny your putting down Sony when I have ran three different Sony receivers at 2ohms at reference levels without a hit of trouble.
     
  16. Tony Lai

    Tony Lai Stunt Coordinator

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  17. Joe Tilley

    Joe Tilley Supporting Actor

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    I have had the STR-DE945,STR-DB940, & yes I currently have the DA-5ES.

    And I do believe you are entitled to your opinion,but the way you made the comment I feel was not needed.

    Nuff said
     

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