SVS PCi amp question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Adam_R, Jul 22, 2002.

  1. Adam_R

    Adam_R Second Unit

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    I read in another thread last week that some people recommend running the sub amp "full on" and adjusting levels using only the reciever sub level. Someone (Vince?) also noted that this was only a benefit if it was a certain kind of amp. He explained that the volume knob on some amps was actually not a volume knob at all, it just controlled to level of input from the reciever going to the amp stage. Is this so with the BASH amp built into the SVS PCi series? Will this really give me a cleaner signal and better sound? If so, I would like to try it. Anyone know? Thanks!
     
  2. JohnDG

    JohnDG Stunt Coordinator

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    IMHO, I'd go with SVS's installation instructions: start out with the AMP set at around 1/2, and the receiver out set around the lowest 1/4 setting. Then adjust the sub AMP setting until the level is properly calibrated. Starting with the sub AMP setting at 100% is asking for problems before the sound output has been calibrated -- you might cause some damage.

    IIUC, the goal is to have the receiver setting in the around 1/4 of the total range, giving you some headroom both up and down to adjust the sub volume from the calibrated level based on the content and your listening preferences.

    jdg
     
  3. Jeff Kohn

    Jeff Kohn Supporting Actor

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    The exception to those guidelines would be if you are using a BFD to EQ the sub. In that case, you want to give the BFD the strongest signal you can without causing it to clip. In that case you may want to use a somewhat higher level on the receiver and adjust downward on the sub amp to get the correct level. The reason for this is that the BFD is a digital EQ and therefore has to perform A/D and D/A conversions. The strong the signal you give it, the less susceptible it is to any noise.
     

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