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So what new technologies should I wait for before buying new receiver

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Carlo Medina, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    I am happy enough with my NAD T763 for now, so no need to upgrade right away. But I was curious as to what new technologies a new receiver should have to make it relatively "future proof" for the next gen of HD players. I'm talking about a receiver that would be released within the next 6-18 months, assuming HD-DVD and Blu Ray are released by then.

    Here's my stab in the dark at it, given I've been out of the receiver (and hardware in general) game for a couple of years:

    1. HDMI switching with the ability to pass 1080p
    2. Next gen Dolby and DTS codec (what was this called? DD+? DTS+?)
    3. Apple iPod interface/control (this is important to me [​IMG] )
    4. iLink? (not sure about this)

    Anything else?
     
  2. Shane Harg

    Shane Harg Second Unit

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    Supposedly HDMI is the end all and be all of connections. It has more than enough bandwidth to carry 1080p signals along with uncompressed multi-channel audio. If you have a DVD video/audio, SACD player with HDMI out, which will upconvert DVD's native 480i to 1080p, your ideal reciever would only need one HDMI cable in and one HDMI cable out to your monitor, which must also support 1080p. Multi-channel audio such as that on SACD would also be carried over this one cable to your reciever.

    According to DTS' website, DTS-HD is compatible with your current reciever (assuming your reciever is DTS compatible), but I'm pretty sure it's some sort of down-conversion.

    Pioneer is the only reciever I've seen of late that will link directly to iPod, but other makers will probably follow suit although, unlike you, I wish they wouldn't.

    HDMI should render iLink obsolete, but only time will tell.

    Since technology is always changing and getting better, there will never be a perfect or ideal reciever, to be perfectly honest. I don't know what ever happened to the concept of upgradeable recievers (like the Act1), but that would sure come in handy nowadays.
     
  3. Bobby T

    Bobby T Supporting Actor

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    I agree with most of the above post. But you will need more than 1 hdmi input on the receiver. You'll need one for a HD cable/sat box. And if hdmi does become the standard connection then video games and other devices will us it as well. I would say the ideal receiver will have 4 hdmi inputs.

    If your going to wait, you might as well wait for the new DD+ and DTS+ decoding receivers to hit the market. They should be out later this year.

    As far as your ipod goes, there are several ways to connect it to any receiver.
     
  4. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    Yeah I already connect my iPod to my receivers, but I'd like the receiver to be able to control it, and sense the track names, and advanced functions, etc.

    And yes, I know technology marches on, but we are at one of those "crossroads" that happens every 7-10 years or so (the last one was when DVD premiered) where everything is being upgraded or reinvented. Then there's a lull period where only incremental advancements are made. I'd like to make sure my new receivers covers all of the bases as far as new, upcoming technology. DD+ DTS-HD is obvious. I won't worry about the inevitable DD+ EX and DTS-HD ES just now [​IMG]
     
  5. Shane Harg

    Shane Harg Second Unit

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    Yes, that's what I meant. One cable for each device and then one out to the monitor.
     

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