RIAA Sues Radio Stations For Giving Away Free Music

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by mike_decock, Oct 2, 2002.

  1. mike_decock

    mike_decock Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2002
    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    0
  2. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 1999
    Messages:
    2,317
    Likes Received:
    0
    You're aware The Onion isn't real, right?

    Can't tell from your post...
     
  3. Paul_Medenwaldt

    Paul_Medenwaldt Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2001
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well i know this isn't true...
    The Onion sure can come up with some good ones!
    [​IMG]
    Paul
     
  4. mike_decock

    mike_decock Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2002
    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  5. RaulR

    RaulR Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2002
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Onion's brand of satire is terrific because it cuts very close to the truth. I wouldn't put it past the clowns in the RIAA to have actually considered doing this.
     
  6. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 1998
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, if the satirist knew anything about the music industry, he would know that radio stations license and pay royalties for the music they play, which would preclude any such action on that basis by the RIAA, especially since the RIAA has nothing to do with performance licensing. Every radio station is required by law to log every song they play, so that appropriate royalties can be paid to the authors, composers and publishing companies by their respective performing rights organisations.

    All this article does is provide yet another groundless argument for file traders to try to draw a parallel to their activities, which of course, it doesn't.
     
  7. Rachael B

    Rachael B Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2000
    Messages:
    4,694
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    Knocksville, TN
    Real Name:
    Rachael Bellomy
    [​IMG] Jeff, I bet you never believed in Santa Claus!
     
  8. Benson R

    Benson R Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2000
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jeff I'm surprised you always bother posting in these threads since you always get little support. I understand your anger since you believe these freeloaders are costing you money but most people here probably would side with me when I say that it is not true.

    My position and many others here is that there is nothing illegal about downloading but that the record companies don't have to make it easy to do and that nobody has right to make money off of it without paying royalties.

    Perhaps your from overseas? I understand that the sale of bootlegs, be it entertainment media or computer software, is a much bigger problem in other countries even many Western European ones.

    I also think in your haste you also missed the point of the onion article. People can hear music for free its nothing new. I think royalties from radio are more about keeping track of what is being played then about profit. When you consider the size of the audience that hears music on the radio and the fact that anyone can record it the cost per listener is very very low.
     
  9. Benson R

    Benson R Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2000
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    0
    People say there is no parallel between recording broadcasts and copying store bought music(without intent to resell).

    I tended to agree with this for awhile but then I started thinking. Initially when recordable consumer devices became available media companies sued to block them. They argued they licensed their properties out for broadcast and no one was allowed to record them.

    Well when someone buys a cd is there really any law that says they can't make a copy on tape for their friend? Sure if they tried to sell a copy they would be in violation but I don't remember signing a license agreement to listen to that cd. I just remembered purchasing it.

    DVDs have FBI warnings but you didn't sign a contract on your receipt. Copying those however would be illegal because there are laws against circumventing the copyright protection (the constitutionality of that can be argued at another time). But there is no copy protection to circumvent on most cds.

    So I think without new laws there is nothing illegal about downloading mp3s unless the person who copied them had to circumvent a copyright protection. Profiting by creating a distribution system would still be illegal but if the creator truly made no money and did not even recoup their investment in it then even that would not be illegal.

    Oh and before anyone gets on my case I spend more on entertainment media than anything else. I have hundreds of movies and cds. The only mp3s I keep on my computer are concert bootlegs of bands for which I already own their entire catalog along with anything else they put out.
     
  10. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 1998
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    0
    Benson, the ist of the article is to make radio appear the same in nature as sharing MP3s. It isn't. Radio pays for their use of music, and I can tell you the royalties paid aren't nickles and dimes, it is a multibillion dollar revenue stream. However, these are also performance royalties, which fall into a completely different category than distribution royalties (mechanicals).

    I bother posting to these threads in an effort to combat the rampant misinformation that plagues forums like this in the hopes that if even one person gets the message I have done them a service.

    For the record, I am not angry about file sharing, even though it does cost me money. What bothers me more is knowing how many great bands will never have a chance at a career because they simply can't earn a living making music.
     
  11. Benson R

    Benson R Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2000
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    0
    From what I understand most musicians will never make a living off royalties, even successful ones.

    I realize we will never come to an agreement on this. I think your wrong and the forum here is not uninformed about this. I think you are right that a lot of freeloaders on most Internet discussion forms are not seriously discussing this issue.

    However I feel the htforum has a much more sophisticated readership so I feel the fact that the consensus is the same here says something.

    I truly believe the explosion of file sharing has had no impact on cd sales or radio royalties. It only costs the industry money if it costs a sale.

    I think it only becomes illegal when someone tries to make money off of it. Most of the file sharing programs are illegal because they take in advertising revenue.

    I would like to hear you debate the specific legal issues I brought up in my post and would like to hear where your from. I know bootlegging is much more prevalent overseas so maybe that's why you feel this costs you money.

    And my opinion on bootlegging is that it is illegal and offenders should be prosecuted. But this is not something new from the digital age so it is not costing the recording industry more than it was before.
     
  12. Benson R

    Benson R Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2000
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh before I call it a night has anyone seen this new ad campaign about downloading? I had a good laugh at 'Downloading makes Britney cry.' I know thats not a quote but it should have been. They should try to bring out more longterm artists that still have future recording careers.

    If a hardworking established band says that they have seen their catalog sales drop in the last few years and can tie that to filesharing I might express some sympathy.

    However if the RIAA wants us to believe that Britney's underperforming album is the result of anything but her audience's lack of desire to continue listening to her in their adult years then they have no respect for the intellect of their audience.
     
  13. James Q Jenkins

    James Q Jenkins Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2000
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    0
    Benson, pick up any CD you have and read the back. There's no stipulation about whether you profit or not on it, there is a very clear prohibition on all unauthorized copying. You are wrong.
     
  14. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,807
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  15. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2001
    Messages:
    4,951
    Likes Received:
    1
     
  16. Seth_L

    Seth_L Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2002
    Messages:
    1,553
    Likes Received:
    1
     
  17. Seth_L

    Seth_L Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2002
    Messages:
    1,553
    Likes Received:
    1
     
  18. mike_decock

    mike_decock Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2002
    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    0
    Personally, I think the point the article was making was that MP3 Filesharing is a PROMOTIONAL tool.
    You can also argue that downloads are actually increasing CD sales.
    -Mike...
     
  19. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,807
    Likes Received:
    0
    Seth,
    Do you personally see anything morally wrong with making a copy of a CD for a friend who more than likely would buy the CD if CD burners didn't exist? I'm not talking about making a copy of a CD to introduce a friend to a band he hasn't heard of before.
    As far as a tax being built in to recordable media, I believe that applies only to cassette tapes and possibly minidiscs. When I can buy 100 blank CD-Rs for $8, I have a hard time believing there is any tax in there.
     
  20. Jeremy Stockwell

    Jeremy Stockwell Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2001
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think part of the problem here is that there is a difference between what is immoral and what is illegal. Sometimes there are things that "feel" wrong even though they are perfectly legal. Other times, you "feel" like you are doing the right (moral) thing, but the law indicates otherwise. That's why we have laws. They set a firm standard in a society where people differ about what "feels" right or wrong.
    Seth is correct about the AHRA.
    Brian, if you want to hold yourself to a higher standard than what our laws require, go for it. I commend you for it! But, you'd better get used to dissappointment if you expect everyone else to do the same (I've had a hard time learning this, myself - still working on it).
    The path of this thread quickly went from "What is legal?" (which Seth answered) to "What is moral?" which could not be answered here, even if the Mods let us try. [​IMG]
    JKS
     

Share This Page