Power consumption in "standby" vs "on" mode

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bob Tarabella, Sep 3, 2001.

  1. Bob Tarabella

    Bob Tarabella Auditioning

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    My Denon 2800 receiver specs say that it draws 5 amps of power. Any ideas how much it pulls when its in the "standby" mode?
    It would be convenient to just leave it on all the time. This would greatly simplify life for everyone in the house that complains about the giant universal remote. If left on all the time, the TiVo remote would be able to control the TV and volume with one remote.
     
  2. Fredrik E

    Fredrik E Stunt Coordinator

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    It draws much, much less in standby mode, maybe around 1W, which means a current of around 10 milliamps. Switch it off when not in use ! [​IMG]
    [Edited last by Fredrik E on September 03, 2001 at 06:34 PM]
     
  3. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    I actually measured this on my Denon AVR-3300.
    In standby, the unit pulls 15-20 milliamps, or 2W at most. When on, with no signal applied from any source, the unit drew .42A, or 50W. This was with a measured 119.5VAC at the outlet.
    When a signal is applied, power consumption changes constantly (above the "baseline" of 50W), depending on the SPL at any given instant.
    I would suspect that the 2800 would be similar. That 5 Amp spec is the maximum current draw, not the continuous.
    Todd
     
  4. Bob Tarabella

    Bob Tarabella Auditioning

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    So then, according to your measured tests, if the receiver input is set to TV, but the TVis turned off, I can expect it to use about as much power as a 50 watt light bulb?
     
  5. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    I aim to have all of my equipment disconnected (switched off by a wall switch) when not in use, except maybe the VCR for programming. I like knowing that when I'm not using it, its not drawing any power at all, and there is much less chance of a storm zapping my stuff [​IMG]
     
  6. Steven Lin

    Steven Lin Extra

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    Imagine my surprise when I discovered that my 3 Brystons consume over 500 watts when idle! Not a good thing in California.
     
  7. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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  8. Bob Tarabella

    Bob Tarabella Auditioning

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  9. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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  10. Randy G

    Randy G Second Unit

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    Just to give an idea about energy costs, here in Illinois, one kilowatt costs about a dime/hr. So if you extrapolate, a piece of equipment which draws 100 watts/hr will cost 100 x 2.4kw(24 hrs a day) or .24 per day. That's about $7.50/month or $90 per year!!.....starts getting expensive to leave pieces of equipment running.
     
  11. Alan Wild

    Alan Wild Stunt Coordinator

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  12. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Yeah, I guess that was wishfull thinking about the lightning strike. One thing I always do though, is when I go away on a trip camping or going out of town, I always unplug everything from the wall sockets completely. So what about if the device is on when the lightning strikes? Is that worse? Knock on wood, I have never had a lightning strike do anything to our household equipment at all. We have lost power before, but we have never had a surge or lightning zap our stuff. I guess thats just luck or the transformer on the pole outside our house.
    Is there any sort of switch you can use in your house that separates the contacts enough that when OFF the lightning is not able to bridge the gap?
    [Edited last by Chris PC on September 04, 2001 at 07:47 PM]
     

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