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Non-OAR in 2nd Run Movie

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brad Eisenhauer, Apr 14, 2002.

  1. Brad Eisenhauer

    Brad Eisenhauer Stunt Coordinator

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    I saw Ocean's 11 last night for the second time. This time was at the weekly 2nd run movies at the student union on campus. I was a bit puzzled because the print was not in its OAR. It was a 1.33:1 print that appeared to be open-matted in some parts and P&S'ed in others. The very first shot was the worst with a boom-mike clearly bobbing around just above George Clooney's head. Other parts looked as though they may have been P&S'ed (based on my visual imaginations of where the mattes would have to go if it were open-matte and how much picture would be left.) Has anyone ever seen this before, and where would a print like this come from? Why would a studio, much less a director, let something like that out of the cutting room?
     
  2. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    It sounds like this was a 16mm print (theaters use 35mm), 16mm was used mostly for educational films in schools but has been replaced by video, but they are still putting out current movies on 16mm for venues like this. I haven't personally seen any of these myself, but I've heard they're shown either open-matte, or if they were shot anamorphic, panned-and-scanned for 1.33. It's possible to do anamorphic on 16mm but the lenses are harder to come by; all 16mm projectors come with just a regular lens.

    How is the sound on these? I don't know if it's possible to do stereo on 16mm; I have 2 16mm projectors and would like to get some of these movie prints but it's a toss-up if they only come with a mono soundtrack.
     
  3. Scott D S

    Scott D S Supporting Actor

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    Hmm. Here at FSU, there were showings of Ocean's 11 last Thursday and Friday at the Student Life Theater. The film was presented in its original 2.35:1 aspect ratio and looked fine. Weird. [​IMG]
     
  4. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    Oceans 11 was shot in the Super-35 process, so that's why it looked like that.

    I'm puzzled to why the print wasn't a reduction print from the 2.35:1 anamorphic internegative.
     
  5. Scott H

    Scott H Supporting Actor

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  6. Nate Anderson

    Nate Anderson Screenwriter

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    When it showed here at SCSU it was also 1.33:1. Bummer...

    I know OAR can be done on 16 mm, since when they showed Pearl Harbor here, it was 2.35:1.
     
  7. Derek Miner

    Derek Miner Screenwriter

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  8. Scott H

    Scott H Supporting Actor

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  9. Scott H

    Scott H Supporting Actor

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    Some additional 16mm projection info...

    Standard regular 16mm projection frame: .373" x .272"

    Anamorphic regular 16mm projection frame: .373" x .272"

    Super16 projection frame: .468" x .282"

    1.85:1 Super16 projection frame: .468" x .253"

    Source: Scott E. Norwood/Film-Tech.com
     

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