Need pre-terminated 75 ft. white RG6 coa, and / or advice...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kevin Reckelhoff, Mar 13, 2002.

  1. Kevin Reckelhoff

    Kevin Reckelhoff Stunt Coordinator

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    Live in an apartment and can't mess around inside the walls. When I had digital cable installed, the tech only hooked up the main TV since that is the only room with an outlet. Since then, I've added a cable modem, and the guy who installed that just ran the cable along the baseboard/doorframes all the way to the computer.
    Since that seemed to work fine, I now want to make a long cable-run from the outlet to a second tv in the bedroom (the cable modem installer put in a three way splitter). So, after measuring the length I ended up with roughly 68' from the outlet to the second tv. Add a few feet for flexibility, and a 75' cable should do the job. Unfortunately, radio shack only sells 50' and 100' pre-terminated cables, no 75'.
    I know nothing about making cables--is it worth considering buying just the cable and cutting/crimping it myself? What tools would I need, and what price would be reasonable for that length plus the connectors?
    Alternatively, would it matter if I had an extra 25' of cable left in a coil under some furniture?
    Finally, will I look like an idiot if I have the cable guy come back at some later date to install a second digital receiver on the bedroom tv, and he sees my "amateur" cable run? [​IMG]
    Thanks!
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    It is very easy to terminate your own cables with "F" connectors. Heck, if you buy the stuff at Radio Shack, they may even put the connectors on for you.

    I'd suggest getting the coax, the "F" connectors and buying the little rotary strip tool for about $10.

    You just insert the coax, spin the tool around the coax 7-8 times and pull - off comes the insulation. This is the only part that takes skill, and the tool makes it simple.

    Then you slide on the crimp-ring and push the F connector onto the end.

    You can use an ordinary pair of pliers to crimp the ring on, or a inexpensive crimp tool, or spend the $18 for the "Hex Crimp" tool at Radio Shack.

    Repeat for the other end.

    Suggestion: buy a package of 6-8 F connectors, cut some 1 foot sections of coax and make a few test cables. Who cares if you ruin a few. This will give you the feel for how to do it.

    When you run the real coax, leave a foot or so of slack so you can re-do the ends if they come loose. (You only need to cut an inch off the end to rid a bad connector).

    Note: I strongly suggest you buy the RG6 coax rather than the slightly cheaper RG59.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Kevin Reckelhoff

    Kevin Reckelhoff Stunt Coordinator

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    Very helpful Bob, thanks for the info!
     

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