Music Lessons - - How do I choose the best instructor for my needs?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Brian Harnish, Jan 17, 2004.

  1. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2000
    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Since I got my new hearing aid, I'm finally able to distinguish (very accurately) between different pitches and notes in music. And, of course, I have realized how bad I need lessons for singing. I'm not a complete newbie -- I can sing somewhat and play the piano (though not in a professional capacity). Reading music is very easy for me. I'm gonna need lessons if I want to become a professional singer/performer (which is what I ultimately want to do).

    I'm seriously considering music lessons from California Music Studios. However, everytime I call, no one can give me any specific information (it seems as if all the numbers I can find are for an answering service for this company). Is this normal? I really want to get voice lessons (as well as piano + guitar but only voice for now) but if I can't get any information out of anyone (they do return my calls, however) then I'm seriously considering checking out other avenues for lessons.

    Has anyone here used California Music studios? They seem to be pretty good according to their web site (which, of course, can be misleading) but I would like to get feedback from others. Also would like some feedback on other companies/instructors of singing and musical instruments that I could sign up with.

    My ultimate goal is to be able to perform onstage and record music in a professional capacity.
     
  2. Orlando

    Orlando Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2000
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well congrats on your hearing ad.

    First off let me start off by saying it is going to be really tough to get to that level. But I am sure you knew that already. But just in case [​IMG]

    Also let me say that I know nothing of the place you are talking about so I can not help you there.

    I studied professionally for years. (woodwinds and brass)So it might not apply but being in the business for a while I can tell you how it will go.

    First you never mentioned how old you are. And that will have a big impact on who you decide will be your teacher. If your at the very least a teenager, which I figure you are at least that old. You are not going to want to have a teacher that mostly deals with children as you will eventually feel like they are talking down to you. You also don't want a finishing coach as they will beat you up as they are preparing you for the next level and not really interested in your learning "your instruments."

    Vocal teachers have a tendency to be very snobby. And most of them will probably perceive your hearing aid as a "handicap" and may treat you as such. As well as any auditions you may go on. People in the business don't have any patiences for anything and act it. But I am also sure it won't be impossible to find someone that truly would like to work with you, especially if you show a gift for it. If your really interested in going forward then it would be worth the time to actually go to the schools and see and talk to them. With a music teacher, chemistry is everything. Your teacher may not be "as good" as someone else. But if your chemistry is good it will truly make you leaps and bonds better. And remember no teacher is forever. Don't be afraid to say I've learned all I can from them.

    By walking in somewhere, especially bigger schools. You will get a vibe just by walking in and you'll know if it's not right at least. And don't be afraid to try it out and if you don't like it. Don't be afraid to ask for someone else.

    Finding a good teacher is not the easiest thing in the world to do. I had to do it for myself for years and know I am doing it for my 2 kids. Good-Luck and always remember to have fun. I left the business because I wasn't having anymore fun. Most people will not make it rich. The love and fun will be the only things to drive you.
     
  3. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2000
    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oops...thanks for the advice! I should also add that I'm 24 years old if that helps.
     
  4. Leila Dougan

    Leila Dougan Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    1,352
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It probably sounds like I suggest this in all my posts, but check out what local universities and music schools in your area offer. I never took vocal lessons but I did study the piano and woodwind instruments. My teacher was a graduate student at the local university and was very good. Some other students were taught by the professors, but at my level (intermediate-advanced) a grad student was good enough. Plus, they have good rates since giving lessons is usually part of their coursework or they are just trying to earn extra cash. Now, the main reason I bring this up is because the music college at this university had a special concentration of music education, where they taught how to teach special ed children and people with handicaps. Perhaps if you can locate a person who has experience working with hearing-impaired people you may not only get someone who's understanding, but who has the resources to better teach someone like yourself.
     

Share This Page