Movie Theaters Near Your Home?

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Scott Temple, Jun 18, 2005.

  1. Scott Temple

    Scott Temple Supporting Actor

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  2. Lynda-Marie

    Lynda-Marie Supporting Actor

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    Unfortunately, what I considered some of the most interesting or cool movie theaters in and around the Seattle area are now something else entirely.

    The one we lost that really saddened me was the UA 70/150, which is not too far from the Cinerama*. It was where the original Star Wars Trilogy opened and had extensive news coverage of the lines around the block. The auditorium of the 150 side was huge with a really classy design, balconies and the whole nine yards. The last time I saw it some months back, it was a pile of rubble. [​IMG]

    The Colosseum met a happier (?) fate, in that the building, with its Romano/Greek-revival style exterior was not torn down during the real estate carnage in the 1980s. It is now a Banana Republic store.

    I can't say I'm really crazy about the theaters with the 17 screens because the stadium style seating, while on the surface is great, is not all that good for folks using wheelchairs. Whiplash looking up at the screen is NOT my idea of fun.

    There are a couple of independent theaters that are not controlled by the big chain corporations, and still retain their original charms. One of them is the Admiral Theater in West Seattle. They shut down the balconies years ago, due to safety concerns, but it is a second run theater - $4.00 for a prime time showing? Hell yes! - and it was saved by a grassroots organization of West Seattle residents as a historical landmark. Score one for the little guys!

    The other independent that I know of is the Des Moines, which is not too far from where I live now, in Kent, Washington. The Des Moines is a single screen theater that was built, judging by the interior, sometime in the 1940s. It looks like it needs some tender loving care [not to mention some legal tender] to get it back up to its full glory. It is likewise a second run theater, with decent prices, and the fellow who I believe owns it is also the ticket seller and the one who serves the snacks. He is very nice, a lover of films and the movie going experience. Sure, there are probably more modern theaters with better amenities, but none of them have this gentleman's dedication, and I always leave with a smile.
     

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