Monster Cables Connection

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark_Be, Jan 11, 2003.

  1. Mark_Be

    Mark_Be Extra

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi all,
    First, let me say thanks again for the help you all have provided on a previous question about widescreen vs standard.

    I eventually plan to upgrade my "starter" speakers (Sony micro speakers) so I bought a roll of Monster speaker cable yesterday to run to my front left and right speakers. My question is...what is the best way to make the connection to the speakers (and to the A/V receiver for that matter). All I did for now is to make sure the cable was twisted as tight as possible then stuck it in the clip connectors on the back of the speakers and receiver. The factory (cheap) speaker cables at least had the ends soldered so they were not "frayed" with individual wire strands sticking out when you stick them into the spakers but I wasn't sure if I should solder the ends of the Monster cable or not. I did make sure the strands were not touching the other wire etc.

    When I upgrade speakers, should I use some other method of connection or is there some other method I should use even on my cheapo speakers?

    Thanks again for the help...
    Mark
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Audiophiles tend to agree that bare-wire is best.

    But many of us like to use "Pin" or "Banana" connectors.

    If you have the "Guillotine" clips on your receiver or speakers, go buy some of the MegaCable pin connectors from Radio Shack. They make it simple to put a neat tip on the wires without copper strands sticking out.

    For behind my speakers I use the dual-banana plugs (xxx-308) from radio shack. But these stick out too far for behind the receiver so I use the single bananas (xxx-306) for behind the electronics.

    Do NOT use the Monster Twist-Crimp ends. These would pull out every few weeks until I discovered the Radio Shack plugs. I have not had a loose connection in 3 years.
     
  3. Mark_Be

    Mark_Be Extra

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey Bob,
    Thanks very much for the input. I'll be heading to Radio Shack for some connectors.
    Mark
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2001
    Messages:
    8,390
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    note that some of the dual-banana plugs are already "clamped" together. in some systems (like my onkyo) these won't work because the spacing between the posts is different.

    when this happens, you'll need to use the individual banana plugs instead.

    it's no biggie...just something to keep in mind.

    i do agree that these plugs make installation and upkeep much easier. i can't hear a difference between using them and bare wire, so i'm going with convenience.
     
  5. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2002
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Make sure you have a wire stripper with notches for whatever gauge of wire you will be using (18, 16, 14, 12, etc.).

    As far as I know, Monster does not divulge the gauge of their speaker wire, so you might have to eyeball the wire and compare to other wire of a known ("revealed"?) gauge.

    In any case, a properly used wire stripper will cleanly remove the wire's plastic outer covering without nicking and of the inner strands of wire and causing any fraying. Other than that, give the wire a good twist in the same direction in which it's braided from the factory.

    Soldering will neither appreciably increase nor decrease the resistance of wire. As long as you aren't having any problem with the wire fraying after it's secured to the connections, which isn't likely with well-tightened connections, you shouldn't have any problem with the wire unwinding itself.

    As far as after-market wire terminators, soldering would be a very secure way to make sure the wire had a solid electrical connection to the terminator.
     
  6. Mark_Be

    Mark_Be Extra

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the help guys! I think I'll go with the connectors as a matter of convenience and, hopefully, I'll be able to upgrade my speakers soon.
    Mark
     

Share This Page