Making My Own Subwoofer Cables

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Daniel K, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. Daniel K

    Daniel K Extra

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    My sub sounds best placed on the oposite wall from my components. I figure I will just make my own cables to length and run them under the carpet. I already have a spool of 75ohm RG6, solid copper 3GH coax made by Perfect 10. I have some questions...

    First, this wire is perfect, right?

    Second, will these ends work?..
    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=092-640
    How are they put on? It says no soldering, are they the twist kind? If they are crimp, would soldering be a good idea anyways, all I have is 60/40 electronics solder.

    Finally, I am going to need a y-adapter at the sub (Velodyne CT-120). Obviously this I will just buy pre made, will this be good?..
    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=181-690

    Thanks
     
  2. DougR

    DougR Second Unit

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    Your good to Go !!
     
  3. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Those connectors require a special crimper, I believe. If you already have a standard RG6 hex crimper, I can recommend these connectors: http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...umber=091-1060
    I use them with Belden 1694A to make audio and component video cables, and so far no complaints. In both cases I don't think it'd even be possible to solder them first, because you have no access to where the center conductor connects to the center pin. Crimping should provide a very good electrical connection anyways.

    BTW, why would you need/want a Y-adapter? If it's because your sub has left/right audio inputs, just plug into either of them. Both of the inputs will just be summed together anyways. The only difference would be a 3dB gain, which is the same as reducing the attenuation (aka increasing the volume control) the same amount. I'd just as soon avoid the extra connection myself.

    -- Dave
     
  4. Daniel K

    Daniel K Extra

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    Good thing you told me, I just have a normal Hex crimper. Thanks
     
  5. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Oh, and I forgot to mention last time, those connectors I linked to need an RG6-quadshield sized (.360" opening) crimp die. Not all hexcrimpers have that size, so it's a good idea to check. The connectors fit dualshield cable just fine, but they're very thick, so they need the larger die. Take abit of force to crimp down as well.

    Good luck,
    -- Dave
     
  6. Daniel K

    Daniel K Extra

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  7. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Yes, I do believe that the compression fittings are a better connection overall, especially in outdoor situations. As I'm sure you've noticed, the connectors and tools are abit more expensive and harder to come by, but otherwise I think most installer type folks tend to prefer them.

    Enjoy [​IMG]
    -- Dave
     

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