I just want to watch movies - Do I need a Denon 2803?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Alex_C, May 19, 2003.

  1. Alex_C

    Alex_C Stunt Coordinator

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    EDIT: That should say 2803.

    It seems that everyone loves the Denon 2803. I know nothing about receivers so I don't know what makes it great. I just want to watch DVD's. Do I need to spend $700 on a receiver to watch movies? What will I be missing if I don't?


    Thanks
     
  2. Dan_Fitz

    Dan_Fitz Extra

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    No of course you dont need to spend $700 to watch dvds. It just depends on which features you are looking fore. I would suggest getting the 2802 model for about $420 from 6thave.com. It has most of the features but is a lot cheaper.


    edit: now they have for 520 shipped. Must have been onsale when I looked last.
     
  3. Myo K

    Myo K Stunt Coordinator

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    one of my local theater shops have the 2802 for $499.99, he had onyl 3 last time i checked, but if he runs out before i cans ave up the cash, im gonna have to get the more expensive 2803, :/,

    etronics has them for a little under 600 shipped, but id feel a lot better buying a receiver and carryng it home myself [​IMG]
     
  4. Gus Smith

    Gus Smith Extra

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  5. Andy Young

    Andy Young Stunt Coordinator

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    I think you need to decide which features are important to you first. It is possible that a $250 receiver will work quite nicely and you'll have $450 left in your pocket.
    • Do you need component video switching?
    • Do you need 6.1 or 7.1? I.e., is a 5-channel (5.1) receiver enough?
    • Do you need S-Video switching?
    • How many digital connections are you making?
    • Do you need the ability for pre-amp outputs (ability to power your speakers with an external amplifier)?
    • Do you need multi-room features? I.e., do you want to use this to power speakers in another room or outside?
    • How good a remote control do you need?
    • How important is brand equity? I.e., are you willing to pay more so that you have a brand X unit?
    This is just a partial list of things that came to my mind. Sony and Pioneer (check out spec on new 912 unit) are two companies that make some really fine entry-level receivers.

    Why pay for 5 optical inputs if you only use 1? Why pay for component video switching if you still use composite RCA plugs?

    Bottom line is that you don't want to pay for features that you don't need ... and you don't want to end up with a receiver that lacks features that you later discover that you do need.

    I know this is sort of non-answer and I don't mean to sound like a jerk (I hope I don't), but I encourage you to better assess your needs and spec out a receiver. I think you'll be happier with your purchase than simply using the "everyone else likes it, so I probably will too" approach.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Alex_C

    Alex_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Andy:

    Drivin an SS? I have a 2001 SS. It's a blast!

    Ok, here's my answers:
    1. What is component switching?
    2. I guess 5.1 is enough unless someone says I really really need 6.1 or that I'll need it in the immediate future.
    3. What's S-video switching?
    4. Digital connections. I don't know what that means either but I plan on connecting my DirectTV satellite, DVD, vcr.
    5. I don't think I need pre-amp outputs.
    6. I don't need multi-room features.
    7. Remote? Heck if it works, I like it.
    8. Brand equity. I don't care i just want it to sound good. I won't be using it for music, only HT.

    Let me know what you think.

    Thanks!
     
  7. Luis S

    Luis S Supporting Actor

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    COMPLETELY off topic but damn Andy, thats one SWEET ride! [​IMG] [​IMG] I am so jealous...[​IMG] One day Ill get one...

    Luis S
     
  8. Andy Young

    Andy Young Stunt Coordinator

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    Alex,

    I'm not going into the detail on why one is better than the other, as it will be confusing right now (I encourage you to look it up, though). There are 4 common types of video connections:
    1. Coaxial cable. This actually carries video and audio in many applications. It's the worst method for both. Many people connect their VCRs to their TVs via coaxial cable. This means that they are sending the video and audio from VCR to TV on the coaxial cable. Never do this. In fact, never use coaxial cable for audio/video connection (with the exception of possible using RG-6 for a sub connection).
    2. Composite. This is the very common RCA plugs. These have been around forever and the cables usually come with any VCR or TV you buy. You know, the red, white, and yellow plugs. Red and white for the left and right audio and yellow for the video. All but the cheapest TVs have composite connections (as do nearly all A/V equipment).
    3. S-Video. This is the next step in video connection. It's higher quality. Though the video signal is still carried on a single cable (like the yellow RCA composite cable), there is separation of the signal onto different wires. Most new TVs have at least 1 S-Video input. Only S-VHS VCRs have S-Video (I believe). DVD players have S-Video.
    4. Component. Here, the video signal is separated into 3 separate cables. Newer, more expensive TVs have component video input. DVD players output in component video. Not much else does at this point (HDTV, DVHS, and some others).
    Video switching refers to having your receiver switch between components (VCR, DVD, camcorder) and send the signal to your TV/monitor. So, if you have all of your components connected using composite/RCA cables, then your receiver would be doing composite switching.

    If you don't plan on using component cables, then don't pay for the feature. Same with S-Video, though I believe even the sub-$400 receivers typically have S-Video inputs now.

    Sounds like you'll be sticking with 5.1 audio. Therefore, you may not want to pay for the extra two amp channels for the 7.1 feature. However, you may want to leave yourself this option. 7.1 adds two extra surround channels.

    Digital audio connections are needed to decode digtial signals (Dolby Digital, DTS, et al.). You'll have at least one with your DVD player. You may or may not have one with your DirecTV sat receiver. If so, then you'll want to use this connection to watch DD encoded PPV movies and such. Sounds like you'll be using two digital connections at the most. No need to pay for more than 3 or 4.

    It sounds like you're learning the hobby, which I think is very fun. Right now, I'd recommend that you look at budget receivers. As I said, Sony and Pioneer make some really nice stuff. So do Harman Kardon, Kenwood, and Yamaha, though I have no experience with their stuff.

    Pioneer's 912 model is brand new and is pretty rich on features for under $400. Kenwood had a VR-6070 (I think) which was a pretty good value. I seem to remember seeing the HK 525 (I think) was also a good performer.

    All of these receivers will probably fit the bill (and exceed your needs) for around $400 - $500.

    Do some searches here on keywords like "budget receiver" "best receiver" "cheap[est] receiver" and the like.

    Good luck.

    BTW, hope you enjoy your Camaro SS, those are fine cars and you can't go wrong with an SS! Thanks, Luis, for the complement. I enjoy my 67, my other hobby. Though I love hearing the Balrog shake my walls as it chases Gandalf, it really pales in comparison to mashing the accelerator and hearing the growl of a V8. Sad that teenagers today seem to have forgotten what an engine is supposed to sound like.[​IMG]
     
  9. Alex_C

    Alex_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Awesome information!!!!
    That really helps me. Thanks.

    I'm going to think about it today.
     
  10. Aaron H

    Aaron H Supporting Actor

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    You don't even need a $100 receiver to watch movies.

    Aaron
     
  11. Andrew Pezzo

    Andrew Pezzo Second Unit

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    Sorry, this is off topic but couldnt help it:

     

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