How to fix window/door rattles?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Tim Kline, May 16, 2001.

  1. Tim Kline

    Tim Kline Stunt Coordinator

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    Ever since I've gotten into HT I've been plagued my the window and door in my HT toom rattling when the bass gets to a certain level. The window I have is a very big picture window, but this one isn't as much of a problem as the door. I have 3 doors in the room.. bathroom and kitchen door are fine, the problem door is the one that goes outside. It's got glass windows in it, and it's that glass that's rattling the most. I'd rather not replace the whole door if I can help it, but does anyone know a good way that I might be able to keep it from rattling so much? It's fun to mention when I brag about my HT, but actually gets pretty annoying when I'm watching a good movie [​IMG]
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  2. John Giddens

    John Giddens Stunt Coordinator

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    It sounds like the silicone that seals the glass to the window frame has lost it's adhesive properties. The same thing for the door. How old is the window and door? If you tap the window from the inside do you hear the rattling? Also can you push the glass around it's edges from the inside and see it separate a little from the frame? By the way, don't push too hard or you might push the glass out! By your description "very big picture window" I would suggest contacting a window or glass company and get them to come out and give you an estimate on resealing the problem windows. Of course if your handy around the house and would prefer to fix it yourself, I could give you a few pointers. I'm no professional though and could only give you beginner type pointers. You would definitely want to do a little research on you own about the procedures. The door is likely a little trickier. Usually the windows in doors are framed with wood, and the strips around the outside edges of the window are wood instead of plastic.
    You might also want to go around your house and see if there is other windows loose, which there likely is. Then if you have a substantial amount of windows loose that need to be resealed, it might be more convenient for you to hire a window or glass company to fix them. Keep in mind that while the glass rattling is annoying, it's also costing you more money to heat and cool your home. The little money it cost to reseal the windows, would be paid back long term in energy savings. If I've left anything out, or you have more questions don't hesitate to ask.
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  3. Tim Kline

    Tim Kline Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the info. Our house is a split-level that was built in the 40's. The windows aren't standard, they open sliding sideways, even too wide for an air conditioner. The window in my HT room definately needs to be replaced and one of these days, if we don't move we'll get all new windows installed.
    The door is most likely also around from the begining. It's a heavy wooden door with glass windows, and the glass seems to be held in place with wood molding around the window. And, it doesn't rattle when I knock the glass but it makes like a loose glass sound, hard to describe. Is there any way to just seal the glass around the door? Like some kind of cauk type of thing? Or would I be better off just buying a new door at Home Depot?
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    Tim Kline
    HT Newbie Extraordinaire!
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  4. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

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    I don't have any answers, but the configuration I'm setting up for my living/media room will also have a lot of glass. However, I'm buying new stuff; I'm putting in a very large Andersen picture window as replacement for same size window, and closing up two room openings with bifold doors that have glass interiors (not good for HT, I know, but looks are important to me, and it's not a dedicated HT room). It sounds based on John's post that if the windows and doors are made well and in good shape, I shouldn't be concerned with vibrations. Reflections would be a different story, though [​IMG] I'll at least be draping my window, and I may end up with a similar solution for the doors (which may actually look cool).
    I hope I'm not sorry for these design decisions.
    Doug
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  5. Rick P.

    Rick P. Stunt Coordinator

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    Tim, been there. Heavy wooden doors are expensive so if it's still in good shape I wouldn't go looking to replace it. Instead, remove the molding from around the window then remove the window. There's probably nothing else holding the window in place (hence the rattle) so be careful it doesn't fall out when you remove the last strip of molding. Clean up the recess in the door and put a thin bead of good quality putty or caulk around the edge of the window frame. Then re-insert the window and replace the molding. You might have to buy new molding that's a bit thinner to allow a good fit with the caulk. The fix should cost you about $10 and take about and hour. Note that if the glass is really thin it might still vibrate, in which case you should pick up a new thicker piece to install in the door. Measure the window when you have it out of the door just in case you have to replace it.
    Hope this helps,
    Rick
     
  6. John Giddens

    John Giddens Stunt Coordinator

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    Rick is right on the money for the solution, assuming you want to tackle it. Make sure the caulk you buy is the kind specifically for resealing windows, because there is small differences between all the different caulks on the market.
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