Got my reply from Pioneer, what the heck are they saying?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by PaulDF, Oct 4, 2002.

  1. PaulDF

    PaulDF Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 17, 2002
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    After ten days I finally got a reply from Pioneer as to what a "Low Cut Filter" is... Seems kinda vague to me, are they just talking out their buttholes? Here's what they said... If anyone can explain this to me better, please do.

    [The low cut filter is a process of adjusting the very low frequencies which can cause distortion to the subwoofer depending on the source, the size and power of the subwoofer also the setting of the crossover frequency mode.
    It is not a matter of "how much" or "how low" of a frequency will cut (how low is done by setting the crossover frequency mode): setting low cut filter "on" will adjust accordingly the low frequency sound to always stop or reduce to maximum possible the distorted sound on the subwoofer.
    The LFE is a similar process but this one eliminates or reduces the distorsion created by ultra low bass tone to all the speakers not just the subwoofer. The "* * " sign indicates the LFE being "OFF", the "0 dB" (zero decibels) which is the default setting for LFE and for each speaker in "test tone " level, means the attenuator works best at 0 dB volume.]
    level, 10 dB means the attenuator reduces best the distorsion at 10 dB.
     
  2. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2002
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Paul:

    I'm going to write this for the second time. Somehow, I lost it the first time................PAIN.

    Don't be disturbed you can't figure out their answer. the only reason I know the story on this one is that I have an old Pioneer SX-1080 (purchased in 79) that has two low pass or cut filters. This receiver was set up to eliminate ultra low frequency noise by using these filters. The setting were < 5Hz and < 15 Hz. In my testing, the use of this filter seemd to really come into play when playing the radio which I did a lot of in college in '79.

    If you had the cover off your speakers you could see the woofer vibrating but really no noise coming from the speakers. This was the low freq noise. Turn on the filter and walla - no more woofer vibration. This feature was designed to keep the speaker from being damaged by the low freq noise.

    Hope this helps.......

    Mike
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh, so it's a "subsonic filter" ! [​IMG]
     
  4. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2002
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Think I screwed up my answer Kevin?

    Seriously, I don't want to provide bad info........

    Let us know.........

    Mike
     
  5. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mike- You're correct. I know what a subsonic filter is, and based on your description of what Pioneer's low cut filter is, sounds the same. Reduces the the volume of really low frequency content to reduce sub distortion. Most of that info isn't real to the source anyway, harmonics of higher up freqs that end up real down low.
     
  6. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2002
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks Kevin - just wanted to make sure I wasn't thinking of the wrong thing.....
    Mike[​IMG]
     
  7. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1999
    Messages:
    38,763
    Likes Received:
    488
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    You can also think of it as a "High pass filter" which only passes frequencies above a certain point, like 20Hz and above; or conversely it cuts out frequencies below 20Hz to protect the driver from the non-beneficial demands to play low frequencies at high enough loudness to damage the woofer driver.
     
  8. PaulDF

    PaulDF Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 17, 2002
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Patrick,

    Yes, that was what I had originally thought... But Pioneer stated that "it is not a matter of how much or how low a frequency it will cut." So then what does the processor base itself on?? The distortion of the signal?
     
  9. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,741
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thats what I thought Mike but when you said Low Pass I thought that it should let the low frequencies pass and cut the high freq. So its more of a high pass filter passing anything above 15 Hz (hence, a low cut filter)
     

Share This Page