Everything into the same outlet?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ColinM, Dec 18, 2001.

  1. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    I have the TV, receiver, DVD, CD, and sub amp all in a power strip, all into one outlet.

    That can't be good. I think it's a 20 amp circuit, but it could be a 15. Later today I'm going to count up all of the wattage ratings listed on the back of the different components.

    Any improvements made by going with a Monster - type surge protector? Won't that all come out of the same outlet much like it does now?

    Thanks

    HK AVR110

    Technics 60 CD

    Sony DVP-300

    Sony 'V' 27"

    NHT SA-2 amp
     
  2. Brett_V

    Brett_V Extra

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    I seriously doubt that the components you mentioned will draw anywhere near 20 amps. The real question is, are you getting any noise feedback from one component to the next by sending them all thru a single power strip. A good line conditioner, while not providing extra amperage, will do a better job of preventing that kind of crosstalk. The line conditioner also cleans up the power that is present in your home, if that iis a problem. The sub amp, and the receiver are the most likely sources of this type of noise, and you might want to put them on different circuits if you decide not to go with any kind of line conditioner.

    My SVS powered subwoofer was creating enough noise in the line to render my x-10 lighting useless. After putting the sub on a different circuit, and utilizing a monster power surge protector/ line conditioner, my problems went away.
     
  3. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    I don't hear any noise at all when pausing the CD and turning up the volume. Is that a good test of the noise floor?
    OK, maybe a very slight buzz, but at pretty high levels, like +5 db on the volume, and I listen at between -30/-15.
    Thanks for the info.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Colin,

    Bret is right, this is not enough equipment to overpower a 20A or even a 15A circuit. For a while I had my whole system, including receiver and two power amps (about 2000 watts of power), on a single 15A circuit and it never tripped.

    That said, it is not a good idea to plug an amp into a cheap power strip. If you ever took one of those things apart and say how they are put together, it would scare you.

    If you want a conditioner, I recommend something with good-quality outlets, like Furman, Panamax or Adcom (can’t comment on the build-quality of the Monsters; I’ve never used them).

    If not, it’s easy to build an electrical box with 4 or more outlets.

    Happy Holidays,

    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Colin- Don't be freaked out, but even if you plug "stuff" into different outlets, more than likely, you're on the same circuit anyway. (At least in the same room.)
    I have *all* my "stuff" running through a balanced power unit, all into 1 outlet.
    Pre/pro, 2 3-channel amps, 32" TV, cassette deck, tuner, DAT deck, MD deck, DVD player, turntable, TV cable box, and there might even be some more.
    Beware that units like Monster can actually *add* distortion to your AC line:
    http://www.psaudio.com/articles/power_conditioners.asp
    Check out Secret's for a bunch of really good reviews and info on AC boxes:
    http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/maste...ditioners.html
    Based on the above, I went with a balanced power unit. IMO, best bang for the buck you can get for "cleaning" your AC.
     
  6. Larry Chanin

    Larry Chanin Stunt Coordinator

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    Colin:

    Panamax makes a line of surge protectors and line conditioners that offer a warranty on connected equipment of up to $5,000,000 (no doubt a marketing gimmick) and a lifetime warranty on the surge protector. Interestingly, you can only cash in on these warranties if all your equipment is connected to the same outlet. All their surge protectors are rated at 15 amps.

    Larry
     
  7. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Thank you, everyone.

    The info is much appreciated.

    Good listening!
     
  8. Brett_V

    Brett_V Extra

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    I can only speak from my own experience, which is with the Monster Power HTS-5000. I saw that Kevin warned you that the monster units can 'add' distortion to your lines, based I guess on the hyperlinked article he included. Certainly looks very impressive and technical, but the bottom line for me was the so-called proof in the pudding. It simply eliminated the noise produced by my powered sub.

    X-10 lighting works by sending a signal through the existing electrical wiring in your home. Generally from 1 type of transmitter to a switch or outlet specifically designed to receive and react to that signal. Frequently, there exists noise in the electrical system that masks the X-10 signal, thus preventing proper operation of the X-10 products. This noise can be inherent in your local power, or can be generated by some electrical device in your house. Its even common for X-10 to malfunction when trying to communicate between devices located on circuits that are on opposite sides of the service panel.

    Anyway, my case was very simple. My SVS sub was one of the last additions to my theater. X-10 and and everything else was in use and functioning perfectly for months until the day I hooked up the SVS. Suddenly the lighting started malfunctioning when I tried to control it from my pronto. First I moved the sub to a different circuit ( I built my theater in the basement and have 3 separate circuits feeding the theater, so I'm sure its not another outlet on the same circuit) and this helped to some degree. Sometimes the light would turn on but not always. But worse yet, I still couldn't turn it off at all from the remote. I had been planning on acquiring a surge protector- line conditioner for a while but it just never seemed to make it to top priority, until this happened. Anyway, long story now, I purchased the Monster Power HTS-5000 and after hooking everything thru it, everything been just peachy!
     
  9. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    Since we're on the subject of watts and amps. Maybe one of you guys can answer a question for me. A while back I added up the total watts my HT is using on each of my two dedicated 20 amp circuits.
    20 AMP CIRCUIT 1
    RPTV: 210w
    DVD: 23w
    CD: 11w
    Sat receiver: 35w
    VCR:18
    Subwoofer1: 350w
    Subwoofer2: 350w
    Subwoofer3: 180w
    Subwoofer4: 180w
    Receiver: 5.6 amps
    20 AMP CIRCUIT 2
    5 channel amplifier: 1200w
    That's a total of 1357 watts on a circuit 1, not counting the 5.6 amps for the receiver. My receiver doesn't give the number of watts only the number of amps. My question is how many watts would 5.6 amps be?
    Thanks
    Legairre
     
  10. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Watts = Volts * Amps

    Each line is 120V, so 1357/120 = 11.3 Amps

    11.3+5.3 = 16.9 Amps

    Each line shouldn't exceed 80% of the wire's maximum load (20 Amps in this case). You are slightly over but I wouldn't worry about it since the equipment watt ratings are for the worst case. If you want to feel safer you could stick the receiver on the same line as the amp...
     
  11. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    Greg, that's what I thought. Watts = Volts * Amps. The TV made me start to second guess myself. It's back panel says 210 watts, 2.8 amps, and 120v on the back. wouldn't that be 336 watts instead of 210?
     
  12. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Watts = Volts * Amps only for DC. AC is different, but I can't tell you how. [​IMG] Hopefully someone else who know's can comment.
    Also, be aware that the wattage figures on the back of equipment is typically worst case numbers. It's rare that that you'd actually draw that number in a real world situation.
     

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