DVD:Multi-Disc vs Single-Disc -wisdom needed

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by James Griffin, Mar 5, 2002.

  1. James Griffin

    James Griffin Auditioning

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    I am slowly building my HT. The first component will be a DVD player. I have my sights on a Toshiba SD-3755 (*progressive scan/multi-disc).

    (*in case I can afford a digital TV in the future)

    I hope to replace my Sony multi-disc CD player with the new DVD player. I was told that plaing CD's puts a "strain" on the DVD player. Keep in mind, we only use the CD player for a few dozen hours per year (mostly at Christmas time).

    Any reason not to go for the multi-disc Toshiba?

    Any thoughts? Thanks in advance.

    Jim Griffin
     
  2. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    CD's put strain on DVD players?

    CD = Audio 2 channel

    DVD = Video AND at least 2 channels of audio...

    Seems like DVD's are the major work load.

    Perhaps the additional mileage incurred using the player for double duty is a concern, but it's not likely to shorten the lifespan of the player.

    Where'd you hear this?

    Don't worry about playing CD's on the DVD machine. You will get great results. I do, over the last 4 years I've been using a single disc Sony. No problems yet. Drawer open / shut a thousand times...

    - CM
     
  3. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    Is there any reason you do not want to continue to use the CD changer when you add a DVD player? When I purchased my first DVD player way back in 1998, I kept my 5-disc Sony CD carousel for CD playback. It's a decent carousel player, and still works fine in my system today even though I have upgraded DVD players several times.
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    afaik, whether playing a cd or dvd, the strain on the machine should be the same (spinning motor, moving laser-assembly, opening drawers, etc), so it's really a non-issue.
    if you want the toshiba, go for it. [​IMG]
     
  5. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    I replace my 5 disc CD player with a 5 disc DVD player. My reasons for doing so:

    1. Didn't want an extra component cluttering up the rack

    2. I like having 5 CDs playing at once

    3. If you have kids, you may find that a few of those slots will be occupied by the same DVD for weeks on end.

    I'm a low-mid level HT kind of guy. This setup works well for me. The higher end guys will tell you that dedicated CD and DVD players give better results.
     
  6. James Griffin

    James Griffin Auditioning

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    Thanks Colin, Scott & Ted.

    Colin, I heard this (strain issue) from a sales guy at ".The Wiz" (large electronics warehouse store in the NY/NJ metro area)

    Scott, I am simply trying to save space (by getting rid of the Sony carosel CD player)in a armoir type (my wife loves it)entertainment cabinet. Perhaps not as serious a concern, since I will likely be going towards a receiver (vs seperates).
     
  7. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    (Some of) Those sales guys will say anything to move another unit.....

    No offense to any of you sales types.
     
  8. Mark Hobbs

    Mark Hobbs Stunt Coordinator

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    Sounds to me like that guy was trying to sell you a CD player.

    For only 20-30 hours of annual use, I certainly would not buy a CD player. The DVD works well for me as a transport. If your DVD's DAC doesn't perform well with CDs, just use the digital coax or optical toslink connection so you are using your receiver's DAC.

    Of course, to get the best possible sound from your CDs, you need a high-end CD player connected to your receiver with audio cables, because the players DAC would likely be better than the receiver's. But for your purposes, relying on the receiver's DAC and using your DVD player as a transport for CDs is the way to go.
     

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