Dust solutions..

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by JeffTimmerman, Jan 14, 2004.

  1. JeffTimmerman

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    I know this isn't the most glamorous topic but in my room it is a problem. We had a new house built and I have converted a bedroom into a dedicated theater room. I have covered the window and have my tv in front of the window with my reciever etc underneath in a stand. I put in 2 heavy duty fans to run to cool down anything in the stand. I do have a vent close to the system about 3 feet away. My problem is that the dust is unreal! I constantly clean all electronics with "canned air" and vaccum like crazy but the stuff multiplies like jackrabbits. I assumed that since the house was new that I wouldn't have this problem at least this soon. We did some drywalling in the basement a few months back and that might have kicked up some dust into the vents but that was some time ago. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

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    I generally don't recommend duct cleaning to my customers unless they are replacing their furnace, have a very old house, or they have a new home that has a lot of construction debris (drywall dust, etc0 in the ducts. Once the ducts are clean you'll need to use a high quality pleated filter and it should be replaced every 30days. I tell folks to get in the habit of changing the filter every time they write a check to the mortgage company, it's easier to remember that way.

    I installed an Aprilaire #5000 E.A.C. in my home and have put quite a few in for customers that have allergy issues. It's a great aircleaner, but a bit pricey for some folks. The installation cost will vary based on the amount of work that needs to be done to install it. You can learn more about it here.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Frank's suggestion about a high-end filtration system is great. If you can't afford it, however, you could at least benefit from an upgraded air filter. If you're using one of those cheesy things that are so thin you can see through it, it would be a big improvement to move up to the denser pleated filters.

    Still, these measures will help, but not eliminate the dust problem, because anytime you move air (i.e., use fans) you're going to have a dust problem. My dust problem started when I installed fans in my enclosed entertainment center. If you can figure out a way to accomplish it, an effective way to further minimize dust with fans is to have an air-tight cabinet with a single inlet. This way you can install a filter in front of the inlet.

    Another thing: You mentioned "two heavy duty fans." That sounds like way overkill. You only have to move enough air to exhaust the generated heat, not keep everything as cold as it would be if it were turned off. Moving more air than you need only brings more dust. My fans will move some serious air, but I have them regulated down to a fairly slow speed. The equipment stays warm (which is fine) but never gets hot.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. JeffTimmerman

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    Thanks for the replies. My only other question is for the fans that I have in my tv stand is it better to move the air out or have one fan drawing air in and then another to exhaust it out? Currently I have 2 ac fans running in opposite directions. I think that is why the dust is so bad in there, one fan drawing the dust in and then it settles. Any suggestions?

    Thanks,
    jeff
     
  5. RobertCharlotte

    RobertCharlotte Supporting Actor

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    That was going to be my question, Jeff: how your fans were set up. Try setting them both up to blow out and see if that helps.
     
  6. Keith Hyde

    Keith Hyde Stunt Coordinator

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    You could try putting a filter on your inflow TV cabinet fans too - pressurizing the space with cooler filtered air. It'll take some creativity though.
     
  7. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    As far as cooling is concerned, you only need the one fan exhausting heat. It will pull cool replacement air into the cabinet. This might help the problem somewhat, but you're still going to have dust problems.


    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  8. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I would assume the exact opposite. New houses are very dusty from the contrsuction dust.
     
  9. Joe Mihok

    Joe Mihok Second Unit

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    Two words: AIR FLOW [​IMG]

    Have one fan "blowing" on the components and the other "sucking" air away. Air flow is essential for cooling any piece of equiptment. As for your dust issue, I can't help ya there [​IMG]. Good luck!
     
  10. Cary_H

    Cary_H Second Unit

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    I would think that with the exception of a new home not having been cleaned adequately after it's completion, an older home will be way worse. The old home will have a higher accumulation of dirt tracked in over time.
    In my experience, dust levels are more a function of the location of your home. Locations closer to high auto traffic will see higher levels. Same can go for proximity to certain industries.
    Any chance your new home sits in a subdivision still under construction? All the neighbours got their lawns in?
    Any propensity for winds to frequent your locale?
     
  11. Cary_H

    Cary_H Second Unit

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    Sorry...with regard to the original question. There is no need for two fans. What you want to do is have one fan pushing in. If you can filter this air all the better.
    You want to keep the cabinet pressurized to keep crap from being drawn in through all the other openings. If you pull air out and induce a negative pressure it will draw in air from whatever opening it sees fit. This puts the kibosh on the air filtering idea.
    The very problem you are seeking to resolve is dealt with in industry where dirty conditions can play havoc on electrical systems in close proximity. Their solution is to make distribution and MCC cabinets just this side of airtight and pressurize them with air. Process air is dry and readily available.
    Dust and high voltage don't get along, or rather, they get along just famously. Not unlike fire and gasoline.
     

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