Does anyone make an RGB to S-Video cable?

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Carlos Garcia, May 27, 2005.

  1. Carlos Garcia

    Carlos Garcia Screenwriter

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    I'm not extremely advanced when it comes to recent technology, but I was wondering if going from the 3 component outputs to an S-Video input is possible. I have a problem with my TV. I have my 3 DVD jukeboxes connected to a signal sensing digital A/V input selector with component cables. However, my TV is not doing well these days (having been serviced 5 times in the last 3 months for the same problem), and it may just die on me, or may be out for a long time. Anyway, my backup TV doesn't have any component inputs, only S-video. I was wondering if anyone makes a component to S-Video adapter, or even if such a thing would work. Thanks for the info.
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Nope. They are incompatible. Component, as you know, divides the video signal into three color segments: red, green, blue. S-video divides it into two segments, color and (I think) light. Your DVD player should have an S-video output – no reason you can’t simply use it in the mean time.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Carlos Garcia

    Carlos Garcia Screenwriter

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    Actually there is a reason, my digital a/v selector only works with component connections, so I have no S-Video, or composite output. Is there anyway to convert component signals to composite?
     
  4. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    Okay, I haven't actually tried this, but it may work.

    There may be a mis-communication here, and it's partially due to how manufacturers 'label' component video connections.

    Component video usually is in three RCA ports, red, green, and blue. They are not true RGB signals. The green connection carries the Y signal; the red the U, and the blue the V, or, if you don't like YUV, try Y, Y-R, Y-B.

    S-Video carries Y on one set, and the whole color set on the other pair.

    (It just occurred to me, I've still left out some big bits.)

    "Y" is the 'luminance' channel, made up of roughly 70% green, 20% red, and 10% blue. The Y-R and Y-B channels are then massaged into that, and ultimately generate the RGB that drive the picture. (YUV component color space is a subset of RGB color space of the same bit-depth, even if both were sampled at 4:4:4.)

    Anyway, back to the original question.

    There are almost certaintly no 'stock' YUV -> Y/C cables.

    However, you may be able to take a 'Y' adapter and merge the UV channels. Then you can get another adapter to go from two RCA or BNC cables into a 4-pin mini-DIN S-Video connector.

    It may work. It shouldn't let the magic smoke out of anything.

    I know I've seen those adapters (2xRCA -> S-Video) somewhere; we've got some installed here, but I can't think of where I saw 'em.

    Leo
     
  5. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    Unfortunately, the U and V info on the S-Video cable is quadrature-modulated onto a 3.58 MHz suppressed RF subcarrier, so just merging the two component lines would do nothing useful.
    The real problem here is that TVs these days can be cheaper to replace than repair: if Carlos has had his unit serviced 5 times in the past 3 months, unless it is some kind of super-widescreen-flat-panel thing, he just needs to get a new set before the bill becomes ridiculous.
     
  6. Carlos Garcia

    Carlos Garcia Screenwriter

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    The set is in the shop because I can't afford a new one right now. I have a 4 yr extended warranty on it (which says if it can't be fixed, it will be replaced) so I'm putting it to use. It's obvious to me that they don't know how to fix it because each time it's come back, it breaks again, with the same problem...at no time has the set worked more than 5 days in a row since they brought it back each time. I asked the warranty company how to take advantage of their replacement warranty, and they said the cost of repairs has to reach 80% of the cost of the set...so far the cost was at about $450 so it's getting up there...I know I'll eventually get a replacement because it can't be cheap to send out a van and 2 pickup guys 30 miles and pickup a 150 LB 32" set everytime, then work on it only to have it break each time they bring it back. I'll be patient, but for the time being, I'm stuck with a tv that only has a composite plug, and all my components only have component out.
     
  7. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    I suppose that would have been too easy... but I figured it'd be worth a shot, anyway.

    And by the by, I believe I goofed: aparently the U and V vectors are essentially for HD, and I should have been using I and Q, or (I think) Pr and Pb.

    Leo
     

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