Do VHS Head Cleaners really work?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DeathStar1, Sep 6, 2002.

  1. DeathStar1

    DeathStar1 Producer

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    This is a VCR that is even less than a year old, and already it's having problems. Everytime I rewind, the video gets all fuzzy and snowy in playback mode. Another VCR, works perfectly, rewind and all.

    I'm wondering if it's worth it to go out and buy a VCR Head Cleaner, or if it would have an easier way of fixing this problem. I was hoping to do some DVD Authoring over the weekend, but with this VCR down here, that dosn't seem likley now...

    Thanks
     
  2. greg_t

    greg_t Screenwriter

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    Get a good video head cleaner, probably will cost $10 to $20. I've had vcr's that seem to get bad tracking and fuzzy pictures, and head cleaners have usually worked well. I have a Scotch High performance brand head cleaner now that is real good.
     
  3. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Hey Casey! Welcome to the forums! You're doin' pretty good so far [​IMG] In terms of the OAR issue... you're gonna love it here [​IMG]
     
  4. Mark R. Ososkie

    Mark R. Ososkie Stunt Coordinator

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    I've had a few pretty bad VCR's, usually panasonic's, that will become unwatchable after about a year or so of use (picture with terrible tracking issues, cannot be adjusted for anything), and putting a good head cleaner in once a year or so fixes them up pretty good.
     
  5. Bill_Weinreich

    Bill_Weinreich Second Unit

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    Sometimes a more intense cleaning is in order. If you feel confident enough, remove the cover to physically clean the heads, rollers, and any point that comes in contact with the tape using alcohol and some lint-free swabs. A small amount of compressed air is also useful at this time to remove unwanted dust. Better yet, make a visit to the old TV repair shop. Most will still perform this service rather cheap ($20-$25).

    Good Luck,
    Bill
     

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