Can the widescreen mattes get burned into your TV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Keith_R, Sep 13, 2001.

  1. Keith_R

    Keith_R Screenwriter

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    I was just wondering, right now I own a standard 4:3 T.V and of course when I watch a DVD the WS mattes are present on the top and bottom of the screen. Can these mattes or "black bars" as they are commonly called get burned in to a T.V screen. I'm using a 27' Sony T.V which is CRT if that is any help. Thanks.
    -Keith-
     
  2. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Keith,
    The sort answer to your question is "yes".
    However, it's not the black bars that get "burned" onto your screen. It's the areas of the screen that actually display a picture that gets wear. If you were to watch nothing but letterboxed material on your 4:3 TV, the top and bottom of the screen would not be used, and the inner 16x9 portion would. What happens, is that the phosphors that create the image dim with age. If you run you picture level high, you speed this process, and increase your risk.
    If you were to them watch a full screen 4x3 image after all that time, you would notice that the areas where the black bars were, are BRIGHTER than the inner 16x9 area of the screen. This is because those phosphors didn't get used.
    To avoid this, make sure you have your picture level calibrated correctly. Chances are, it's near it's maximum setting (know as "torch mode"), which is very dangerous to your set. RPTV's are at greater risk than direct-views, because the CRT's have to work harder to produce an image in brightness that is comparable to a direct-view.
    Don't leave static images (especially with bright white areas) on the screen. The phosphors on the CRT actually burn to make the image. If they are not allowed to cool at times, they can be damaged. Lots of full-screen, moving pictures averages the brightness of the phosphors, so they age more uniformly. Certain stations have their logos and stock tickers in the same place, which can be damaging..
    That's why you see allot of channels with translucent logos. By doing this, background information shows through, and causes the area to be more dynamic - thus, avoiding a totally static image.
    -Ryan Dinan
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    [​IMG]
     
  3. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    The above is true, but if you turn down your contrast to appropriate levels you can safely sit back and watch widescreen movies without worry so long as you also watch 4:3 material about as often as widescreen.
    How low a contrast is best? Well without a colorimeter, the safest asnwer is the lowest that lets white look white instead of gray. That is of course in a room with low lighting.
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    Guy Kuo
    www.ovationsw.com
    Ovation Software, the Home of AVIA DVD
     
  4. Rick Simpson

    Rick Simpson Agent

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    So would it be a good idea with my widescreen to watch the 4:3 material at stretch mode sometimes to keep the whole screen active?Thanks
     
  5. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Supporting Actor

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    Rick:
    Absolutely. You should definitely be using the stretch modes on your set if you wish to prevent burn-in. I'm not sure which set you have, but many widescreen models actually use gray, as opposed to black, bars on the sides when viewing 4:3 material. The results can be detrimental in a short period of time.
    While I am pro-OAR, I am not willing to stick to this regime and have my investment damaged. On my Toshiba widescreen, ALL normal television viewing is done in TheaterWide1 stretch mode, which is the best of the modes available. I don't consider TV viewing critical, so I don't mind the loss of the OAR - but honestly I could care less - because I'm not going to have any burn-in on my set!
    The only time I will watch 4:3 material properly is if I am watching a DVD in that format. Movie viewing for me is critical, and I insist on it being in the OAR.
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    Jeff
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    "They're coming to get you Barbara..."
     
  6. errol

    errol Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Keith,
    Info and results of burn-in graphically represented here .
    Thanks,
    Errol
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    Keohi HDTV
    Your Friendly HDTV Tips Site
    [Edited last by errol on September 15, 2001 at 07:17 AM]
     

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