Cal with Avia: S-video, component 480i, vs 480p differences for VHS? (I'm

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Kevin C Brown, Jun 5, 2003.

  1. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    I am still relatively new to all the permutations and combinations as far as video stuff goes.

    Anyway, I accidentally calibrated my new HDTV-ready set with the 480i output from my player. Then I went back with 480p. The settings definitely were not the same.

    And even on top of that, I got into the service menus, and some of the stuff changed there too. (Horiz overscan, and horiz position, for example.)

    Is this normal?

    So if I get different "best" settings for say the s-video input vs component 480i vs component 480p, how do I calibrate for "std" analog broadcast material?

    I think I saw a thread not too long ago asking about an Avia equivalent for VHS. (I'm going to go search now...) But I'd be curious as to others' feedback too...


    I have to keep asking this stupid question though too: I can leave the player in progressive mode all the time, right? And because the TV I have, has a 16:9 squeeze mode (Tosh 32HFX72), I can also set the player to 16:9 mode too. But what happens if I play 4:3 material on a DVD? Does it still fill the whole screen? Or because it squeezes the vertical size to get the proper aspect ratio for 16:9, then it will add vertical bars on the L & R for a 4:3 picture, so I will end up with a small 4:3 picture? (I obviously haven't tried it yet. Just got the component cables this week, and am mostly done with calibrating it.)

    THANK YOU!
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    What you are encountering is not unusual.

    What you need is a TV that has several "memories" so you can save one set of settings for 480i, another set of settings for 480p, etc.

    Since your TV has both 16:9 mode (squeeze) and 4:3 mode, leave the DVD player in 16:9. The meaning of 16:9 mode on a DVD player is that the player does no reformatting and adds no additional black bar material and you choose the aspect ratio using the TV remote to make it look right.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    As you can see, the title got a little messed up. :b

    Cool, my TV has a "preference" setting for each input.

    For normal broadcast material, if I calibrate over the S-video connection, would that be close enough? (Analog 480i.)


    I'm going to have to spend some time looking at your site. For example, I know that SVM is bad, but I can't remember why. I used to know what "anamorphic" meant but forgot that too. The difference between say 2D or 3D comb filtering. I have had scaling explained to me 3 or 4 times, and it still hasn't sunk in yet. Thanks! [​IMG]
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Normal NTSC broadcast material is supposed to adhere to a standard, but "everybody" says it varies from one station to another and even from one show to another. For using the TV's own channel selector, you may have to calibrate another input first and guess when doing the settings for broadcasts because there is no quick way to get a known good unadulterated AVIA test pattern into the TV's tuner. You might find that doing a calibration using the composite video input also handles broadcasts. If you use an S-VHS VCR to tune in broadcasts and connect it via S-video cable, the calibration via S-video should be best.
     

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