Another (semi) hi-res format to contemplate

Discussion in 'Music' started by LanceJ, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    The EMI "Extended Audio Disc" (it helps if you read German). Over at AA someone already bought one of these..

    But this isn't the first time because there are other titles that also contain a 5.1 DTS and/or 5.1 Dolby Digital track and a linear 2.0 PCM track:

    * those "Superdisc" titles from Monster Cable;

    * deluxe edition of Depeche Mode's Playing The Angel album, a CD+DVD package (here in the States; Europe gets a hybrid sacd+DVD);

    * a chill-out/drum-n-bass title by LTJ Bukem on the DTS Entertainment label, another CD+DVD package (I own this one). They also sell a similar package for a Blasters live album.

    * Jean Michael Jarre's Aero compilation CD+DVD with a 96/24 stereo track.

    * a DJ/funky house music CD+DVD album by Bad Boy Bill, Behind The Decks (two reviews indicate a true discrete 5.1 mix)


    My theory on why these are being tried out:

    * the surround mixes can be played on any dvd player connected to a surround receiver; or any HTiB system.

    * no problems with bass management

    * on many people's systems, the DTS track (which IIRC uses only a 4:1 data compression ratio) can sound nearly like PCM.

    * no confusion for people that unknowingly own dvd-audio players (a very real scenario) & who don't have the analog outs hooked up: they will still obtain stereo or multichannel sound with no hassles.

    * they operate just like regular dvds.

    * except for probably those really cheapo non-licensed players, the 48/24 (those extra bits are significant!) or 96/24 stereo track can be accessed by any dvd-video player and is also (usually) available via its digital output too.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Bobby T

    Bobby T Supporting Actor

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    Reading your post and the one linked to I see 3 problems

    1. The cost is way to high. Even those of us who buy DVDA/SACD are not going to pay $28 a disc for DD/DTS and a hi res stereo track

    2. Titles. If the record companies want mainstream succes they are going to have to launch with titles that the mainstream public buys. Not the usual classical and jazz.

    3. Marketing. If any new format is going to succeed it's going to require a massive marketing campaign. Most people don't know what DVDA/SACD/Dual disc is.

    with that said the potential for this format to make it is there. Like said above the confusion and complication is removed. Pop the disc in and play. No extra cables or special voo doo rituals to get it to work. 1 cable that's already in place. I don't think bass management is even an issue for the regular guy. They can't figure out the 6 analog cables enough to get to the bass management part.
     
  3. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    I thought DTS music Cds predated DVD?? [​IMG]
     
  4. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    I also agree as far as DISadvantages, go the price of the EMI titles is much too high. Because right now those highly respected Living Stereo series of hybrid sacds, and classical dvd-audios from Universal Music - both with hi-res stereo and surround tracks (well, three channel anyway on the LS series) - only cost from $13 to $15 at Best Buy.

    As far as the b.m. thing: AFAIK, most hi-res players under $150 don't include b.m. for the hi-res signals, so in case that guy did have analog cables connected as the manual instructs, he could experience problems if his satellites were of the common variety that use 4 inch or 3 inch "woofers". If he were to play one of those Telarc 5.1 recordings with the bass warning on the label, or 5.1 rock/pop recordings like Guero or Legion Of Boom with heavy bass in the front/rear channels, and really turned up the volume......pfffft!

    I think DTS-CDs debuted in 1997, about the same time as the dvd format. Over at quadraphonicquad.com/DTS disc forum I'm sure someone has posted a date for this.
     

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