A problem connecting my turntable

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Otto Fruytier, Aug 3, 2001.

  1. Otto Fruytier

    Otto Fruytier Auditioning

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi there
    I've bought a pioneer D710S a/v receiver, which unfortunately doesn't have a phono input. When I connect my turntable to aux or tape I hardly hear anything at all. Is there a way to connect it?
    Thanks, Otto
     
  2. Joe Casey

    Joe Casey Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 1999
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Unfortunately, no. Without a phono input, you won't hear anything like you said. The output of a phono cartridge usually maxes out at 6mV, whereas a standard line-level input (for CD etc) is usually looking for upto 2.5V. As you can see, a big difference. You need an external phono preamp, which starts at around $80 US. This phono preamp 'up's' the voltage (in addition to performing RIAA equalization) to an acceptable lin-level voltage. Make sure you find out what your cartridge outputs before buying any old phono preamp. Usually, moving-coil (MC) cartridges output upto 1.5mV, whereas moving-magnet (MM) cartridges output upto 6mV. You need to get a phono stage that matches your phono catridge output.
    Hope this helps.
    ------------------
    Q
    [Edited last by Joe Casey on August 03, 2001 at 09:48 AM]
     
  3. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Randy
    Otto,
    I don't know if they have Radio Shack in the Netherlands, but you can purchase a pre-amp at the Shack pretty inexpensivley. If you can't find that, you can buy an inexpensive dj mixer (two channels with fader between), which should have a pre-amp built in. Just look for the grounding terminal, and it should handle a phono cartridge.
    Good Luck!
    ------------------
    Randy Tennison
    Kansas City, MO
    Outdated home theater photos (disregard the Bose and Toshiba 3006, they are gone) at
    www.hometheaterforum.com/bbs/equipment/28554.html
     
  4. Burke Strickland

    Burke Strickland Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You do need a phono stage to boost the signal from the cartridge to the level the line inputs on your receiver can handle. The Radio Shack phono stage would get you hooked up very economically, but is notorious for "noise". (The DJ mixer is a gamble -- be sure you have return privileges in case it doesn't include a true phono stage and gives you the same result you are getting now -- or sounds bad.)
    If you want a really musical experience (i,e,. not buried in noise) with your LPs there are a lot of options out there, ranging in price from about $50 to over $1,000. Check out the information and discussion in yesterday's thread about the same subject: http://www.hometheaterforum.com/uub/...ML/041684.html
    Burke
     
  5. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2000
    Messages:
    2,635
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm sure it was just an oversight, a Phono stage does more than just signal amplification.
    LPs are recorded with equalization curves that roll off the bass response (and maybe the extreme HF response as well I don't recall) -- this is the RIAA curve, but prior to adoption of the RIAA curve some others were in use that were similar but not identical.
    Regards,
    ------------------
    John Kotches
    Contributing Writer
    Secrets of Home Theater and High Fidelity
     
  6. Marvin

    Marvin Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 1999
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    Marvin
     
  7. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    2,174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  8. Joe Casey

    Joe Casey Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 1999
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    John,
    Oversight? See my post above [​IMG].
    ------------------
    Q
     
  9. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2000
    Messages:
    2,635
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  10. Burke Strickland

    Burke Strickland Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    quote: a Phono stage does more than just signal amplification...equalization... RIAA curve...[/quote]John is correct in stating that the phono stage does more than just amplify the signal... equalization according to the RIAA curve is another important reason you need to be sure you are using a device with a true phono stage, and not just a signal gain booster.
    Without the equalization, the sound from phono albums would not be pleasing at all. On the record itself, the sound recorded according to the RIAA curve has reduced bass to reduce the size of the grooves in the vinyl ("large" grooves are hard for the stylus to track, and thus contribute to trackiing errors and distortion) and it has increased treble to help mask hiss and other objectionable noises. Then in playback, the equalization boosts the bass and reduces the treble. In doing so, the bass is back in balance with the rest of the music and the hiss/noise gets reduced to a (hopefully) inaudible level as the exaggerated high frequencies are reduced to also be in balance.
    Presumably, if well done, the music as originally recorded is restored for your listening pleasure with this encoding and decoding. One might assume that the quality of implementation of this analog process can vary and may be somewhat related to price of the phono stage as well, so that investment in a "better-than-bottom-feeder" phono stage is justified if high quality reproduction of sound on vinyl is a priority.
    For a more technical look at the RIAA curve, read this: http://www.infomaniak.ch/~bonavolt/riaa.htm
    For the "official history" check this out: http://www.riaa.com/Audio-History-2.cfm
    Enjoy!
    Burke
    [Edited last by Burke Strickland on August 03, 2001 at 01:41 PM]
     
  11. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
     

Share This Page