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How Do You Measure 115dB?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 of 5 OFFLINE   GeorgeGA

GeorgeGA

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Posted February 08 2005 - 05:49 AM

I have ETF5 with their calibrated mic and preamp, Behringer FBD, and Servodrive Contrabass with bridged Crown K2. I have achieved a nice curve at around 80dB.

Apparently ETF cannot be used to generate high dBs. How would I go about seeing what my curve looks like at 100++dB? Would buying TrueRTA do the trick?

Thanks,
George

#2 of 5 OFFLINE   Ilkka R

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Posted February 08 2005 - 06:13 AM

Just raise the volume and the curve should rise. Just calibrate input signal lower so that it won't clip.

All though I do recommend buying TrueRTA, it's QS option is very good.

#3 of 5 OFFLINE   JamesDB

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Posted February 08 2005 - 06:34 AM

The problem is not (just) the input signal, it's the microphone. With volume that high it will not be able to return correct results since it's being overdriven.

But you are right, your EQ curve will look slightly different at higher volumes, however you would need a dynamic parametric eq to correct for that. The difference however will probably not be that big.

J

#4 of 5 OFFLINE   Leo Kerr

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Posted February 08 2005 - 07:22 AM

A second point would also be a more literal interpretation of the question. Posted Image

Use ear-plugs or rifle-range head-sets.

#5 of 5 OFFLINE   Ilkka R

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Posted February 08 2005 - 09:28 AM

Quote:
The problem is not (just) the input signal, it's the microphone. With volume that high it will not be able to return correct results since it's being overdriven.

What mic you have then? If it's overdriven, then you have to buy a better one.

Behringer ECM8000 is a very cheap but good mic, it can read levels up to 120dB.