Okay, let's debate camera bags

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Ronald Epstein, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    I used to own a Slingshot (a 300, I think). The bag did not distribute the weight of my equipment very well with only one real shoulder strap, causing an ache in my back and shoulder when I hiked. I actually hiked to the top of Mount Washburn in Yellowstone with it -- and that trip convinced me to get a real backpack. The Flipside design works much better for me -- I can carry more equipment with less strain now.

    BTW, I think the resurrection of this thread was a good omen. I sold my Flipside 500AW to someone on POTN.com (a photography forum for Canon shooters) who contacted me out of the blue. The 500AW was just too big for my needs -- the 400AW is as big as I can use for airline travel and hiking.
     
  2. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    I have a rolling bag that I use when traveling, that qualifies as my "personal item," stores my electronics/camera gear, and fits under the airplane seat quite nicely. However, I've been sort of re-evaluating the notion of permanently wheeled bags and have found they're generally frowned upon, especially for international travel (wheels + European cobblestones = frustration). That's why for my primary carry-on luggage bag, I went with a bag that can be easily converted to a backpack. Putting that on my back while rolling the smaller bag has generally worked well, but it's fatiguing since the heavier of the bags is on my back instead of on wheels, and there have been times when I wished they could trade places.

    Samsonite makes a fold up cart everyone seems to love for the purpose of adding wheels, as-needed, to a non-wheeled bag. So I'm thinking of getting that for the heavier bag, and switching to a non-wheeled bag for my personal item, which in theory would also allow for more overall storage.
     
  3. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    I'm amazed by how much photo gear you guys go hiking with. For me it's just a small P&S Canon SD600 in my fanny pack - although it's worn out front not in back. I have a Sportsman's Edge large cordura pack with 4 zippered compartments. The rear quick-release compartment fits a small frame revolver and one of the front compartments is the right size for the Canon. The use of the fanny pack lets me get to stuff quickly. The rest of the stuff I carry is in a more traditional day hike backpack

    Fanny pack.jpg
     
  4. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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    Subtle....
     
  5. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    I sometimes do miss the days when I'd travel lighter, with only a camera and single lens, but I just cannot get the shots I want with that type of setup. This summer, I hiked with the most weight ever when we were in Glacier National Park, carrying two dSLRs, three large lenses, and a small pancake lens, plus a tripod. Having two bodies with different lenses mounted and ready to shoot did pay off, though. I was not constantly swapping lenses between wildlife and landscape setups as in previous trips.
     

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