Floorstander "stand?"

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Ian C, Jun 24, 2003.

  1. Ian C

    Ian C Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm thinking about the Athena SF-1's, but notice they are only 35 inches tall. I would need the tweeter to be at about 38-39 inches (so speaker at like 42-43 inches tall) in order to hit me at ear level.

    Why are so many floorstanders so short? Are there long "spikes" I could buy?

    EDIT: I found these but it sure looks like it would make it unstable (I have kids). Anything else out there?
     
  2. Lewis Besze

    Lewis Besze Producer

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    Ian,
    cases like that even some mag reviers place either some object below the front half of the speaker[extreme],or unscrew the 2front spikes a couple of turns[gentle] to make them lean backwards a bit so the tweeter's dispersion will be "higher".
    I use the later technique myself due to the fact I miscalculated the height of the stands I needed for the fronts.It works like a charm for me.

    Lovan makes the "Jazz" stands for floor standers but they are expensive.
     
  3. andre-k

    andre-k Agent

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    save the money on the stands and go for the as-f2's. They are higher up and the have two (8 1/2" I believe)woofers instead of one.
     
  4. NateF

    NateF Stunt Coordinator

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    Have you thought of making a DIY stand? I'm not an expert in carpentry or acoustics, but if it were in my house, I'd just put them on top of a simple wooden box. For $20 in materials you could easily make speaker stands as sturdy as you want, and have it constructed to your specifications. Would take all of a couple hours one weekend.

    Here's what I'd do - take the spikes off the bottom of your speakers. Get a 2x6 and a 2'x4' piece of MDF. Make a box out of the 2x6's, with the MDF as the top and bottom. How fancy it is depends on your skill and how much you care. Attach the spikes to the bottom of this box, and use the holes left by the spikes to attach the box to your speaker. You may want to fill the box with sand or some other dampening material, if they change the sound of your speakers too much (and to make them more stable).

    I'm not an expert DIY-er but I have made a few custom items for my home theater because either no one made what I was looking for, or it would cost far too much. This doesn't sound like an unreasonable project, even for someone with mediocre carpentry skills (such as myself).

    -Nate
     
  5. Ian C

    Ian C Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm probably just going to wind up getting the F2's. I like Nate's idea though. If I do go for the F1's, I'll probably do something like that.
     
  6. Tim_S

    Tim_S Stunt Coordinator

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    There is a much easier and simpler solution that I use with my VMPS RM 1's. If you get a packet of door shims, you can slide them under the speakers tilting them up just a bit which can fix the problem. Since you can put a couple of shims under and they go back far, they are also nice and stable.

    Tim
     

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