Copyright Cops?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by MatthewA, May 31, 2008.

  1. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    Talk about the fox guarding the chicken coop.
    Brian, re-read the post you are replying to. I revised it before your reply showed up.
     
  2. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    So you both backtracked on your prior statement and claimed I said something I didn't.
     
  3. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    And just out of curiosity, in general, where do used books, CDs, and DVDs fall in this whole copyright debate? The producers of the media don't get any money from their resale by these methods.
     
  4. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    I can't believe you didn't realize your mistake, Matthew. You really should read the messages you reply to more closely. The distinction you've missed is that Johnny Angell's question had to do with the law permitting ripping CDs to MP3s, while your assertions were regarding the law prohibiting copying DVDs.
    I'm sorry; this oversight on your part must be embarrassing. I truly didn't intend to prompt that embarrassment.
     
  5. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    Resale of all three is legal, unless explicitly prohibited by the license you were granted as part of your original purchase agreement (which is very rare). The only requirement is that in reselling copyrighted content, you must discard all copies you may have, both legal (such as MP3s ripped from CDs) and illegal (copied DVDs).
     
  6. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    That's fine. Thanks for pointing that out. I re-read it accordingly and I see the distinction.
    I just worry whether those given power to enforce the laws if this copyright enforcement body comes to power makes that distinctions.
    But when I mentioned DVDs, which one could theoretically rip onto a video iPod, I implied CDs too. But a DVD is hardly a "perfect" digital copy of a film. A 35mm negative holds far more info than a Blu-Ray disc, let alone a DVD.
    What about CDs? Should they be subject to the same digital copy protection as DVDs? Sony tried it with that rootkit thing, and it was a disaster.
     
  7. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    Perhaps they should have been, but they weren't. And the music recording companies get shafted as a result.
     
  8. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    I see what you mean by a perfect digital copy of the disc itself. Yes, that is true. Of course, there are reasons why one would want to back up a disc for personal use. Especially if it's a DVD that children will be watching a lot.
    Furthermore, the fact that this body will be able to search privately-owned ISPs without a warrant bothers me a great deal.
     
  9. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    In the United States, there would almost surely be a requirement for probably cause. That's an American principle that is only abridged in the case of national security -- NOT for commercial reasons.
     
  10. Bryan^H

    Bryan^H Producer

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    Scare tactics. It will never happen. Utter nonsense.
     
  11. Bryan^H

    Bryan^H Producer

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    If cared for properly, and stored in the right climate(not overly hot, and humid) a dvd has a lifespan of 30-120 years. That is considered a lifetime to most people.
     
  12. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    Yes, indeed, but for some people the 30 years (or less with wear) is not a lifetime. That's the point.
     
  13. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    Never say never. Before yesterday I would not have believed it.
     
  14. Bryan^H

    Bryan^H Producer

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    Well, if it did happen I think thats when people start fighting back. No one confiscates my computer, and lives:=
     
  15. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    Again, the point is the limit, not the fact that it will rarely become applicable. Remember the context presented, with children messing with the DVD and degrading it to the extent that folks would want to make backup copies, which is illegal.
     
  16. Todd H

    Todd H Go Dawgs!

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    Nothing like watching companies desperately cling to outdated business models. We see how well that worked for the music industry. Of course that is perfectly within their rights, just as it is within my rights to stop buying their product. If you treat paying customers as criminals, then be prepared for the backlash.
    I still haven't seen anyone answer the question of how they can tell what's pirated and what is not. Instead of hassling iPod owners, how about spending this time and effort going after people that actually sell bootleg CD's and DVD's in flea markets, street corners, etc.?
    Brian^K, what projects have you worked on so that I can make sure I don't purchase them? I don't agree with your viewpoint so, as a consumer, I've decided not to support your work.
     
  17. Brian^K

    Brian^K Supporting Actor

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    The music industry's demise is that they didn't take the threat seriously enough, soon enough. They lost their business model through neglect.
     
  18. Todd H

    Todd H Go Dawgs!

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    Uh huh. Tell yourself that all you want. Their business model died because they didn't adapt to the new digital distribution model. When they finally figured out that it was too late they used hordes of lawyers and buying legislation to try and stop the bleeding. End of story.
    And you didn't answer my other questions:
    1. How will they be able to tell what's pirated and what's not?
    2. What projects have you worked on? I'm serious about not supporting your work.
     
  19. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    That tone was totally uncalled for. Will you please return to civil debate a.s.a.p.
    Furthermore: multiple sequential posts by one and the same poster are frowned upon in this forum. Especially if they hardly make sense because the reader has to find out for her/himself what the reply was to.
    Please group your replies together in one post. If necessary you can use the edit function if the previous post is one of yours.
    Thanks for understanding.
     
  20. Edwin-S

    Edwin-S Producer

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    If the music industry's model is dead then who is publishing all of these CDs and downloadable music tracks. Last time I paid I attention I hadn't heard of any music publishing and recording companies filing for bankruptcy. I think the "death" of the music industry is just RIAA propaganda. There haven't been too many entertainment conglomerates rushing to get out of the recording business, so saying their business model is dead is an exaggeration.
     

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