Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan Director’s Cut Blu-Ray Review

Fascinating! Stunning Image - Highly Recommended 4.5 Stars

Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan arrives for the second time on Blu-ray, this time with a presentation of the Director’s cut, featuring a few new scenes and extensions of existing scenes that adding roughly 4 extra minutes to the run time (116 vs. 112). For this release, Paramount has digitally remastered the film (from a 4K scan), producing stunning picture quality and delivering qualitatively the finest version of this film home video has ever seen.

Arguably the best outing for the original crew now looking better than it ever has, this release comes highly recommended. With strong sales, we can hope that similar treatment is given to the remaining Star Trek films (with the Director’s Cut of The Motion Picture deserving to be first in line).

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982)
Released: 04 Jun 1982
Rated: PG
Runtime: 113 min
Director: Nicholas Meyer
Genre: Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi
Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan
Writer(s): Gene Roddenberry (television series Star Trek), Harve Bennett (story), Jack B. Sowards (story), Jack B. Sowards (screenplay)
Plot: With the assistance of the Enterprise crew, Admiral Kirk must stop an old nemesis, Khan Noonien Singh, from using the life-generating Genesis Device as the ultimate weapon.
IMDB rating: 7.7
MetaScore: 71

Disc Information
Studio: Paramount
Distributed By: N/A
Video Resolution: 1080P/VC-1
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Audio: English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD, Spanish 1.0 DD (Mono), French 2.0 DD, Other
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, French, Other
Rating: PG
Run Time: 116 Min / 113 Min
Package Includes: Blu-ray
Case Type: Standard with Slip Sleeve
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: A
Release Date: 06/07/2016
MSRP: $22.98

The Production: 4.5/5

“Surely, I have made my meaning plain. I mean to avenge myself upon you, Admiral. I deprived your ship of power, and when I swing around, I mean to deprive you of your life.”

James T. Kirk (William Shatner), having given up command of the Enterprise with his promotion to Admiral, is restless. Overseeing Starfleet trainees, with his former First Officer, Spock (Leonard Nimoy), helping to usher the next generation of standard bearers for the United Federation of Planet’s explorers and peacekeeper, and the rest of the former crew of the USS Enterprise having stepped away from crewing missions into the unknown.

Across the stretches of space, First Officer Chekov (Walter Koenig), serving aboard the USS Reliant under Captain Terrell (Paul Winfield) in search of a lifeless planet to test the Federation’s Genesis Device (to create life from lifelessness), stumbles upon a former enemy of Kirk and the Enterprise – Khan. Khan, a genetically modified human from earth’s distant past (the 1990s), once tried to overthrow Kirk and take control the Enterprise, but was beaten and left to survive on a lush planet for the rest of his days with his loyal crew of fellow genetically modified humans. But Chekov, checking out faint signs of life on a now storm-ridden and hostile planet, is captured and mind-controlled along with Capt. Terrell, forced to do Khan’s bidding. The USS Reliant, now under Khan’s control, sets off to hunt down the man who had beaten and abandoned him 15 years earlier to exact his vengeance upon him.

Following the modest critical praise and relative financial success of Star Trek: The Motion Picture (which reportedly cost Paramount a stunning $43MM to make), Paramount sought to continue the work of Star Trek on the big screen with a considerably smaller budget (under $10MM), and brought in TV producer Harve Bennett to help make that happen. Harve promised to deliver at that price (the eventual cost would be a little more than the $10MM), and while Wrath of Khan’s overall box office take was lower, the profits were much higher. And despite the noticeable cost cutting (by comparison to The Motion Picture), Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan was a hit with fans and critics alike – and a bona fide cinematic franchise was (re) born!

On board as Director was Nicholas Myer. His assured hand in the director’s chair ushered in the third and perhaps most resonant phase of Star Trek’s existence. The first phase was born with the television series – colorful, potent science fiction premises and a near-utopian future where adventure, fisticuffs, and beautiful women lit up the small screen. Robert Wise’s lofty and grand The Motion Picture represented a short but distinct second phase as Kirk and crew were launched on the big screen with high-minded concept science fiction and a leap in scale. The third phase, arriving with Khan, adjusted the tone and conceptualization of Starfleet, more explicitly embracing the military framing of the organization through a naval paradigm, and executing the action – particularly the standoff between the USS Reliant and the USS Enterprise – as an “Enemy Below” inspired submarine-like tale, echoing the original series episode Balance of Terror, and recapturing a genuine spirit of adventure along the way.

A drastically reduced budget from the grandiose The Motion Picture, The Wrath of Khan becomes a legendary example of the economy of excellence. Serving as the first of its kind – a sequel film to an episode of television (The Original Series’ “Space Seed”), the stripped down sets and ‘bottled’ nature worked to emphasize an intimacy to the action and bring the audience closer to the characters through tight mining of character interactions. Along with a brilliant return to the Khan role by Ricardo Montalban and his masterful dance of dialogue, The Wrath of Khan was faster, sleeker, and decidedly more akin to the tone of the Star Trek audiences fell in love with from the series. With The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek was both familiar and new.

Even for non-Trek fans, The Wrath of Khan is an absorbing tale with the cast delivering fine performances, served by a tight and meaningful script. The special effects and model work from Industrial Light & Magic is of impressive quality, and to this day – in cinema drenched with boundless computer generated imagery – holds up well with shots of the Enterprise locked in a stealth battle with the USS Reliant inside the Mutara Nebula standing out.

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan represents in the most intimate, yet least boundless way possible, everything that Gene Rodenberry (and the other many creative talents who brought the Star Trek series to life in the 1960s) aspired to; an examination of humanity through the lens of adventures in the unknown universe. Death and rebirth, action and consequence, choice and regret – it’s all deeply mature and, through smaller in scale and execution, ultimately equals the philosophical underpinnings of The Motion Picture’s V’ger premise. The difference here is a genuine sense of action and adventure, and a crew of characters given space to more formally reprise – and expand – the roles they delivered on the legendary Original Series. William Shatner, under Myer’s direction, is perhaps the finest he has even been as Kirk; welcomingly restrained in some ways, emboldened in others, and in the embrace of his aging – his performance sustains the philosophical flavors of the story well. Leonard Nimoy too, having returned for what he saw as his final turn as Spock, was flawless. Nimoy and Shatner as Spock and Kirk exchange moments here that underlie the philosophical theme of time and regret, and ultimately give rise to the potent and gut-wrenching final moments between them in the film.

The fresh faces in the film, Saavik played by then-newcomer Kirstie Alley, the lovely Bibi Besch as Dr. Carol Marcus, the late Merritt Butrick as David Marcus (Merritt would later show up on Star Trek: The Next Generation in the first season episode, “Symbiosis”) and Paul Winfield as Captain Clark Terrell, deliver precisely what the film calls for (Paul Winfield would also appear on The Next Generation in the highly regarded 5th season episode, “Darmok”).

The story, pacing, direction, performances, special effects, modesty of production, and script, augmented by James Horner’s magnificent brassy and bold score, conspire to create a quintessentially exciting adventure for the crew of the USS Enterprise and a worthy claimer of the title of very best Star Trek film.

Video: 4.5/5

3D Rating: NA

When Paramount released Blu-ray editions of the original crew movies, Khan was lauded for its greatly improved image and audio (over earlier home video releases,) – and was the only film to have been digitally remastered. But it was met with some displeasure over a noticeable increase in blue tones throughout. This release of the Director’s cut (which also includes the theatrical cut) addresses that complaint, and the results are a delightful array of sharp contrast, beautifully saturated colors, intact grain structure and detail that “show you something that will make you feel… young — as when the world was new.”

The heavy-duty red uniforms a richly red, blacks are deep, the star field (notably during the opening credits) crystal clear, and skin tones warm but still very natural. Certainly there is some softness to be found, but attributable to the source not the remastering. There are moments in this film where the image looks absolutely flawless (several of them being close-ups of Kirk!)

Audio: 4/5

Featuring what sounds like the same English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD audio from the previous Blu-ray release, The Wrath of Khan sounds terrific. With involving surround effects, stable bass, healthy low frequency effects, and detail in the spacing – including a fire crackling from an early scene between Bones and Kirk that still surprises me – and crisp dialogue focused in the center channel all come together to the film justice.

As a lifelong James Horner fan, the true delight for me is hearing is rollicking score abound in 7.1. With his brassy, celebratory sound, his use of Alexander Courage’s theme from the show, and his main theme brilliantly triumphant and spirited, the music is a wonderful successor to Jerry Goldsmith’s (debatable) pièce de résistance

Special Features: 4.5/5

In addition to the previously available special features being available, a new almost 30-minute documentary, “The Genesis Effect: Engineering The Wrath of Khan,” that dives into the development and production, is available. The audio commentaries offer informative listens with the partnering of Director Nicholas Myer and Manny Coto (Star Trek: Enterprise writer/producer) being especially revealing and entertaining. The text commentary by Michael and Denise Okuda – a version of ‘pop-up’ video factoids – is great to see again for the first time since the DVD release.

This release represents what Paramount should be doing with their Entire Star Trek film library – delivering the accumulated special features, along with new retrospectives, with top-notch audio, superb video quality and, where one has existed, a directors or special cut to go along with the theatrical version. All that’s really missing here are the variations of a few short moments that would have appeared in the ABC broadcast – but I’m trying desperately not to be too greedy here.

Director’s Edition

Theatrical Version

Commentary by director Nicholas Meyer (Director’s Edition & Theatrical Version)

Commentary by director Nicholas Meyer and Manny Coto (Theatrical Version)

Text Commentary by Michael and Denise Okuda (Director’s Edition)

Library Computer (Theatrical Version)

The Genesis Effect: Engineering The Wrath of Khan—NEW!

Production

  • Captain’s Log
  • Designing Khan
  • Original interviews with DeForest Kelley, William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and Ricardo Montalban
  • Where No Man Has Gone Before: The Visual Effects of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
  • James Horner: Composing Genesis

The Star Trek Universe

  • Collecting Star Trek’s Movie Relics
  • A Novel Approach
  • Starfleet Academy: The Mystery Behind Ceti Alpha VI

Farewell

  • A Tribute to Ricardo Montalban

Storyboards

Theatrical Trailer

Overall: 4.5/5

There’s a reason The Wrath of Khan is so often cited as fan’s favorites in the series (for me, The Motion Picture just pips this adventure for a myriad of reasons I’d love to go into WHEN Paramount does the right thing a releases an upgraded Director’s cut of that film in HD). It saved Star Trek on the big screen, gave the movie series a lifeline in its framing for how Kirk and crew should exist on the big screen (in ways very different to the television series) – and did so in a way the studio believed was economically sound.

The Director’s cut is my preferred version of the film. The added character moments, particularly offered to Scotty in the reveal of his nephew serving aboard (that would add emotional depth later in the film following Khan’s surprise attack), and the exchange between Saavik and Spock as they discuss Kirk, are meaningful additions.

Highly Recommended.

Published by

Neil Middlemiss

administrator

101 Comments

  1. Thanks for the excellent review.I particularly liked the part where you quoted a line from the film to describe the video!The new 4K scan and the restoration of the Okuda Trivia Text Track combine to make this new DC release of the movie essential for any Star Trek fan!

  2. Pretty sure the final budget was around 13 mil, not under 10. Mike MInor mentioned a couple years after it came out that it was supposed to come in around 12mil, but that the studio didn't allocate enough stages, so they ate a mil just in overtime and nightshifts and weekends to keep switching out the different sets on the same stages. Plus ILM cost them more than they had planned (which makes sense given the Genesis demo was originally something much more simplistic.) CFQ and AFI mags reported that Trumbull bid the show at 1.5 mil but that ILM 'won' the bid with 2.8 mil. There are different stories as to why that played out in this fashion, but I don't recall the numbers themselves ever being disputed.

  3. It was already a perfectly serviceable TV episode, back when it was called THE CHANGELING. While I initially (read: the first 10 or 12 years after it came out) detested the stately style of TMP, only loving the Goldsmith score and most of the Trumbull vfx, ever since seeing the widescreen laserdisc I find myself returning to it again & again, more than any of the other films (though this doesn't apply to the director's cut — I think most of the 'improvements' are anything but.) A lot of the 'slow-motion train wreck' feel (and yeah, some would put more emphasis on the 'slow motion' that the 'train wreck' part) owes to script, but just as much screams out on the production side 'bad call' — as much as 'bad execution of good concept,' plus a few extraordinarily good executions of so-so concepts.

  4. Nice review.  Looking forward to this – I really hope maybe Paramount is using this disc as a test to see how much demand there is which might lead them into making new 4K scans for the rest of the original movies.

  5. I was about to turn 6 when TOS started, and was watching TIME TUNNEL (the pilot for that with Michael Rennie was also one of my favorite viewmasters.) My only memories of TREK before syndication in early 70s was Kirk & Spock fighting from AMOK TIME and Abramam Lincoln on the viewscreen. I lived in San Jose from birth till almost end of the century, and the weekend before TREK debuted in syndication in the bay area, CREATURE FEATURES (hosted by the late great Bob Wilkins) showed a special preview of TREK … I stayed up … and what did I find? Abe LIncoln AGAIN! Spent half the show wondering if Lincoln was going to be in ALL episodes.

  6. Anyone else having their order delayed by Amazon? The customer service person I emailed said they ran out of stock but I wonder if they could be waiting for a shipment of corrected disks?

  7. "….the music is a wonderful successor to Jerry Goldsmith’s (debatable) pièce de résistance "  Really? Debatable? James Horner's score is one of his best, but pales in comparison to Goldsmith's music for ST:TMP.

  8. I saw the original series in 16mm while serving aboard the USS Enterprise in 1968&69.Gene Roddenberry had paid a visit while we waited to deploy.We watched them quite often during those two years.I'm 68 now and I have enjoyed the movies especially  the Wrath of Khan and Voyage Home.The newer JJ Abrams take are really enjoyable with the casting of the main characters being spot on as younger versions of the original crew,especially Chris Pine as Kirk.I don't know if I'll worry much about Paramount correcting the missing lines in Khan.It doesn't seem so urgent to me now as it might have in the past.I used to raise a bit of hell back in the day if there was any deviation at all in movies at the theater on VHS,laser disc and DVD.I pick my battles more carefully now to cut back on the stress.I want to be around a bit longer to enjoy the newer technologies and restorations of old favorites that may make it on to blu ray and all.Sorry for babbling on.Movies have been my favorite thing for many years going back to the roadshows and all.Best wishes to all.

  9. Toss up between II and IV as my favorites in the series, but looking forward to this.

    Star Trek TMP is next? That one should just be dropped from the list and forgotten. Major disappointment. I saw it opening night in a theater with about 1,000 other people. The sound of the groans as the film ended was better than the movie.

  10. Star Trek TMP is next? That one should just be dropped from the list and forgotten. Major disappointment. I saw it opening night in a theater with about 1,000 other people. The sound of the groans as the film ended was better than the movie.

    A textbook example on how editing can make or break a movie. The Motion Picture would have been a perfectly serviceable television episode if all the slow, lingering shots (everywhere, and not just the half an hour flyby on the Enterprise) had been trimmed back.

  11. Pretty sure the final budget was around 13 mil, not under 10. Mike MInor mentioned a couple years after it came out that it was supposed to come in around 12mil, but that the studio didn't allocate enough stages, so they ate a mil just in overtime and nightshifts and weekends to keep switching out the different sets on the same stages. Plus ILM cost them more than they had planned (which makes sense given the Genesis demo was originally something much more simplistic.)

    CFQ and AFI mags reported that Trumbull bid the show at 1.5 mil but that ILM 'won' the bid with 2.8 mil. There are different stories as to why that played out in this fashion, but I don't recall the numbers themselves ever being disputed.

    I mention the budget was over the $10MM planned in the next sentence of my review (but don't quote an exact figure as it is hard to nail down the true number).

  12. Toss up between II and IV as my favorites in the series, but looking forward to this.

    Star Trek TMP is next? That one should just be dropped from the list and forgotten. Major disappointment. I saw it opening night in a theater with about 1,000 other people. The sound of the groans as the film ended was better than the movie.

    Your opinion.

    There are plenty of us here who love The Motion Picture. 

    Oh, and no such groans when I saw it in the theaters – methinks such anecdotes is so much bullshit from haters.

  13. When I saw The Motion Picture in 1979, uproarious clapping at the end of a movie was a thing. In a fairly packed auditorium I attended, TMP got a few scattered golf claps. But mostly I sensed… puzzlement? We have been contacted. Why have we not responded?

    The Wrath of Khan did receive an ovation at the same venue in 1982. And my Dad said, "Now that's more like it!"

    By The Search for Spock, however, we were back to golf claps. And my Dad proclaiming, "Well, that stunk!"

  14. Your opinion.

    There are plenty of us here who love The Motion Picture.

    Oh, and no such groans when I saw it in the theaters – methinks such anecdotes is so much bullshit from haters.

    Yes, my opinion. But no need for snarky responses. Let's all play nice and behave.

  15. Yes, my opinion. But no need for snarky responses. Let's all play nice and behave.

    True, I was quite snarky. I apologize.  But to me, your comment about TMP was snarky.  I understand it's not for everyone.  There are plenty of films I don't like, but I don't wish they would be "dropped from the list and forgotten".  Any film with its fans deserves proper home video treatment.

    Besides, if TMP didn't do as well as it did, there wouldn't have even been a Wrath of Khan,

    (to bring my mini-rant back on topic).

  16. True, I was quite snarky. I apologize.  But to me, your comment about TMP was snarky.  I understand it's not for everyone.  There are plenty of films I don't like, but I don't wish they would be "dropped from the list and forgotten".  Any film with its fans deserves proper home video treatment.

    Besides, if TMP didn't do as well as it did, there wouldn't have even been a Wrath of Khan,

    (to bring my mini-rant back on topic).

    I appreciate TMP as going for a 2001 vibe…and naturally, it's subject to the same criticisms as the Kubrick film.  It is the only movie that tried for that feel (the 2001 sequel certainly didn't!) and for that, it stands alone. It also boasts the best visuals of any of the original TREK films. Once the new STAR TREK BEYOND is released (with Kirk motorcycle-riding in space), I think some Trek fans may look at TMP with a more appreciative eye.  If they do remaster the Director's Cut of TMP, they will certainly have my money.

  17. Count me in for a directors cut of tmp on blu Ray. Im also interested In New transfers for the tos films!

    There are several tv spots for wrath of khan that could've been included.

    Was there more than one trailer for khan??

  18. True, I was quite snarky. I apologize.  But to me, your comment about TMP was snarky.  I understand it's not for everyone.  There are plenty of films I don't like, but I don't wish they would be "dropped from the list and forgotten".  Any film with its fans deserves proper home video treatment.

    Besides, if TMP didn't do as well as it did, there wouldn't have even been a Wrath of Khan,

    (to bring my mini-rant back on topic).

    I also apologize. Just having a bad day and sometimes say things I shouldn't.

    Strange that II, IV and even XI were pretty good films, but the odd numbered ones in the series weren't really all that great. Then we have that dreadful period with the Next Gen cast. On the other hand, the latest films with Chris Pine as Kirk are fantastic.

    Once again, my opinion, others may disagree 🙄

  19. Star Trek TMP is next? That one should just be dropped from the list and forgotten. Major disappointment. I saw it opening night in a theater with about 1,000 other people. The sound of the groans as the film ended was better than the movie.

    The excellent music score makes up for the other shortcomings.

    —————

  20. Posting this here as well…..

    Well folks—-it's all over.

    The MAJOR screw up I dreaded.

    They lost a shot completely.

    The shot where Sulu turns to Saavik and says, "May I remind the Captain…"

    It's gone. It's the same shot where the Kobayashi Maru info disappears from the screen piece by piece.

    They accidentally reused the earlier shot where Sulu says, "Course change projected."

    I mean seriously. And now I am calling Bulshit that Meyer wanted those lines cut.

    I'll bet it was a acrew up that they caught and just decided to call a Director's choice.

    This is recall worthy, unless they claim it is also "a choice"

    In any event it will hurt sales and that will affect the future releases.

  21. Hoping sell-through price on this is reflective of a restored 34 year-old film. Neil, any comment on the "glitch" observed during the Kobyashi Maru sequence that is being reported by some?

    Yes – it's there in both the theatrical and Director's cut. Paramount is looking into and, if I had to guess, I'd say it's an error rather than a choice (but I want to hear from Paramount first). It's a few seconds and ultimately should be corrected, but I am honestly worried that this could affect future plans for the other movies so while I want a corrected disc, I want more for Paramount to understand the error and then have good sales that encourage them to keep going through the other titles.

    But it's a wait-and-see game for Paramount right now.

  22. I would think an "uproar" will send a good message to Paramount. That people care about Star Trek.

    Or have the suits ask "WTF are we doing releasing physical discs when we can fix the HD stream online and our target audience – the under 30s – can watch it again online?"

  23. The under-30s are only watching the JJ Abrams movies.

    I'm 27, have been a Star Trek fan since I was 3, and have watched every episode, movie, documentary, read every technical manual, and most novels.

    You were saying?

  24. Except for streaming part which I could do without and only Doug has a higher number so far — I like most of the odd numbered movies as well as the JJ movies and Voyager.

    STV is still hard to take, X is OK

    There are a few of us here who can honestly say we watched 1st Run TOS though at least I had the forethought to be in Elementary School at the time.    I had the Mumps and watched one S2 episode if I remember things a little fuzzy

  25. I was just a little too young to really appreciate what the storylines were about though always thought spaceships and phasers were cool of course.   it all meshed with the

    non-stop Apollo stuff going on at the time which at that age was really what it was about.   Parents had gotten their first color TV around that time and the ST Colors were great

    for showing off the 21 inch Console so we watched it or found something else to do.    Of course when you only got 2 channels clearly at night it was somewhat limited in your

    viewing choices.

  26. Wrath of khan was my last introduction to trek. Saw it in the theater in 1982. I've been hooked ever since. I started watching the tv series in the mid 80s when they aired on tv. I tried to record and buy many of them on VHS too. The cage was a big deal when the t came to VHS.

    Saw all of the films in the theater except 5.

    I really enjoyed the 90s because of all the great Star Trek shows and movies that were happening then.

    In the 80s I also watched the motion picture on VHS. That one has grown on me a ton especially the score. One of my favorites.

    Anyway wrath of khan is still the top of my trek list and film list too.

  27. I was about to turn 6 when TOS started, and was watching TIME TUNNEL (the pilot for that with Michael Rennie was also one of my favorite viewmasters.) My only memories of TREK before syndication in early 70s was Kirk & Spock fighting from AMOK TIME and Abramam Lincoln on the viewscreen.

    I lived in San Jose from birth till almost end of the century, and the weekend before TREK debuted in syndication in the bay area, CREATURE FEATURES (hosted by the late great Bob Wilkins) showed a special preview of TREK … I stayed up … and what did I find? Abe LIncoln AGAIN! Spent half the show wondering if Lincoln was going to be in ALL episodes.

    Wow, I could have written this post myself.  I watched some of the original series when it first aired and then repeatedly in syndication.  I was a huge Time Tunnel fan too.

    I also revered Bob Wilkins on Creature Features, first in Sacramento, then in Oakland.  You might want to check out the documentary Watch Horror Films, Keep America Strong: A Journey Into Creature Features.  It brings back a lot of fun memories.

  28. Anyone else having their order delayed by Amazon? The customer service person I emailed said they ran out of stock but I wonder if they could be waiting for a shipment of corrected disks?

    When I look at Amazon now, it shows as in stock.

    Since Paramount hasn't even formally addressed the issue yet, much less released a statement, I doubt that Amazon is holding orders for that reason.  If they were holding orders, it would more likely be due to customer complaints.  If enough people complain about a certain item, they will temporarily suspend offering it while someone investigates the issue.  (For instance, sometimes a new box set will be halted if they shipped a round in poor packaging and everyone received damaged copies; Amazon might halt orders for a day or two while they determine how to better ship the item.)  But that doesn't appear to be happening here.

  29. A textbook example on how editing can make or break a movie. The Motion Picture would have been a perfectly serviceable television episode if all the slow, lingering shots (everywhere, and not just the half an hour flyby on the Enterprise) had been trimmed back.

    I think one of the reasons TMP resonates with me is that it does have a more leisurely pace and contain lingering shots. The flyovers of The Enterprise and, later, of V'ger are a delight to me, offering up a sense of awe and wonder and the chance to let the atmosphere of space wash over me. There are things about it I don't much care for, including some of the casting and performances, but the visuals and the indisputably gorgeous Goldsmith score make it an oft-revisited title for me. The blu-ray release corrects a lot of the sloppier aspects of the rushed theatrical release, but as we are all begging… it's time for the director's cut…

  30. I think one of the reasons TMP resonates with me is that it does have a more leisurely pace and contain lingering shots. The flyovers of The Enterprise and, later, of V'ger are a delight to me, offering up a sense of awe and wonder and the chance to let the atmosphere of space wash over me. There are things about it I don't much care for, including some of the casting and performances, but the visuals and the indisputably gorgeous Goldsmith score make it an oft-revisited title for me. The blu-ray release corrects a lot of the sloppier aspects of the rushed theatrical release, but as we are all begging… it's time for the director's cut…

    Not meaning to further derail this thread, but the Blu-ray for TMP IS the theatrical cut.  Perhaps you mean the sloppier aspects of the "special longer version" that was how this movie was always presented since it's original home video VHS and early laserdisc release – that is, until the first widescreen laserdisc and VHS release in '91.

  31. Just seeing a few minutes of the new TWOK — which to be honest looks better to me than it did in the theater) has me realizing more now than ever how badly we need a better TMP BR, requiring a 4K scan. I want the theatrical version (either that or an edit-it-yourself version) personally, but mainly I just need it so that the good stuff in the pic looks glorious again. The Trumbull-shot Enterprise stuff nearly always looked magnitudes better than ILM's attempts, and I want those visual pinnacles … badly! 

  32. "….the music is a wonderful successor to Jerry Goldsmith’s (debatable) pièce de résistance "  Really? Debatable? James Horner's score is one of his best, but pales in comparison to Goldsmith's music for ST:TMP.

    Yes, some would debate whether ST:TMP was Goldsmith's most important work (some consider that to be Alien, some consider Planet of the Apes to hold that mantle). I happen to think it is his finest and most important work, but others would debate me on that (hence "debatable".)

    And Horner's work, being landmark in itself, is a worthy successor when you don't have Goldsmith back doing scoring duties.

    But I would debate you on Horner's score paling in comparison!

  33. I adore Jerry Goldsmith's score for TMP, as it is his most traditionally thematic, and therefore completely atypical for him. The overture, which is largely based on Ilia's Theme, is sumptuous. Horner's score is a different beast, and as such, not merely an apple and orange comparison, but an apple to pomegranate comparison.

  34. So it looks like I'm going to hold off on this purchase until Paramount (hopefully) resolves this glitch/"choice". 🙁 I was really looking forward to owning this.

    Or just buy it now, enjoy 99.96% (4 seconds out of 6,960) of it and return/exchange it when it's fixed. [emoji12]

  35. I saw the original series in 16mm while serving aboard the USS Enterprise in 1968&69.Gene Roddenberry had paid a visit while we waited to deploy.We watched them quite often during those two years.I'm 68 now and I have enjoyed the movies especially  the Wrath of Khan and Voyage Home.The newer JJ Abrams take are really enjoyable with the casting of the main characters being spot on as younger versions of the original crew,especially Chris Pine as Kirk.I don't know if I'll worry much about Paramount correcting the missing lines in Khan.It doesn't seem so urgent to me now as it might have in the past.I used to raise a bit of hell back in the day if there was any deviation at all in movies at the theater on VHS,laser disc and DVD.I pick my battles more carefully now to cut back on the stress.I want to be around a bit longer to enjoy the newer technologies and restorations of old favorites that may make it on to blu ray and all.Sorry for babbling on.Movies have been my favorite thing for many years going back to the roadshows and all.Best wishes to all.

    Welcome to the Forum

    I saw several shows in 16mm prints at fan conventions

  36. I emailed them last night as well and no reply yet.

    But call me irresponsible, or crazy. I'm actually thinking of keeping it. Or getting a second defective copy while I get the replacement. That way I can have the defective version too along with the corrected. Why? Why not?:blink:

  37. I emailed them last night as well and no reply yet.

    But call me irresponsible, or crazy. I'm actually thinking of keeping it. Or getting a second defective copy while I get the replacement. That way I can have the defective version too along with the corrected. Why? Why not?:blink:

    You're keeping him?:)

  38. I finally received a reply to my email about the replacement disc:

    —————–

    Thank you for contacting us about the error on the Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan Director’s Cut Blu-ray release.  It is always our intention to distribute the highest quality product and we would be happy to send you a replacement.



    We will send a postage paid envelope to the name and address provided.  Once you receive this, please enclose the entire product you purchased (including its casing and all printed materials) along with your mailing address and send the envelope back to us.  Once we receive your package and verify that it is eligible for replacement, we will send you the corrected product.



    We always appreciate receiving feedback from enthusiasts such as yourself and apologize for any inconvenience this error has caused.



    Again, thank you for your interest in our products and we look forward to continuing to bring you outstanding entertainment in the future.



    Sincerely,


    Returns Fulfillment Team

  39. I finally received a reply to my email about the replacement disc:

    —————–

    Thank you for contacting us about the error on the Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan Director’s Cut Blu-ray release.  It is always our intention to distribute the highest quality product and we would be happy to send you a replacement.



    We will send a postage paid envelope to the name and address provided.  Once you receive this, please enclose the entire product you purchased (including its casing and all printed materials) along with your mailing address and send the envelope back to us.  Once we receive your package and verify that it is eligible for replacement, we will send you the corrected product.



    We always appreciate receiving feedback from enthusiasts such as yourself and apologize for any inconvenience this error has caused.



    Again, thank you for your interest in our products and we look forward to continuing to bring you outstanding entertainment in the future.



    Sincerely,


    Returns Fulfillment Team

    And Warner Brothers just sends out a new disc, without having you to send the disc let alone the packaging and printed material.  SMH

  40. I don't have the link handy but as I was contemplating purchasing this I ran across an article with I think it was the director of STII who hinted a 4K product was in the works. Rather than do the purchase/exchange rigmarole for the BD, I will just wait for the 4K UHD which I would hope will use the newly corrected master.

  41. I don't have the link handy but as I was contemplating purchasing this I ran across an article with I think it was the director of STII who hinted a 4K product was in the works. Rather than do the purchase/exchange rigmarole for the BD, I will just wait for the 4K UHD which I would hope will use the newly corrected master.

    Be sure to buy the JJ trek films on uhd.

    Paramount has stated they will use those 2 titles to determine if they will release any additional uhd blu Ray titles. Including non Star Trek films.

  42. The older version has far too much blue – to the point where all the colours on the console in the background are blue, as opposed to the mixture of blue and green on the newer disc.

  43. I mean for gosh sake. The uniforms look faded and orange-ish in the 2009 Blu-ray — when they were brand new and clearly supposed to be burgundy.

    Also was Target a sponsor for the movie in 1982– tie-ins perhaps?

  44. http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Star-Trek-II-The-Wrath-of-Khan-4K-Blu-ray/153729/

    While Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is listed on blu-ray.com there is still no release date and no audio track information. I do own films 1-10 on DVD and had never gotten around to repurchasing them on 1080p blu-ray. As soon as this comes out on 4K UHD blu-ray I will purchase it! Eventually I will upgrade the DVD’s to 1080p blu-ray minimum and my favorites will instead be 4K UHD when they are available.

  45. Dave Moritz

    http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Star-Trek-II-The-Wrath-of-Khan-4K-Blu-ray/153729/

    While Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is listed on blu-ray.com there is still no release date and no audio track information. I do own films 1-10 on DVD and had never gotten around to repurchasing them on 1080p blu-ray. As soon as this comes out on 4K UHD blu-ray I will purchase it! Eventually I will upgrade the DVD's to 1080p blu-ray minimum and my favorites will instead be 4K UHD when they are available.

    According to a Paramount rep I spoke with months ago, there were no plans for a UHD release, partly due to less-than-expected UHD sales of Trek '09 and ID.
    Don't know if anything has changed since then but I wouldn't hold my breath.

  46. Dave Moritz

    http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Star-Trek-II-The-Wrath-of-Khan-4K-Blu-ray/153729/

    While Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is listed on blu-ray.com there is still no release date and no audio track information. I do own films 1-10 on DVD and had never gotten around to repurchasing them on 1080p blu-ray. As soon as this comes out on 4K UHD blu-ray I will purchase it! Eventually I will upgrade the DVD's to 1080p blu-ray minimum and my favorites will instead be 4K UHD when they are available.

    I'm interested in this title on uhd as well as the other classic Trek films with proper mastering.
    The motion picture directors cut SHOULD be on blu ray and uhd. It was Robert Wise's intention that the Directors cut was the finished cut of the film.

  47. Dave Moritz

    Star Trek II: Wrath Of Khan directors cut is on my purchase list here in the next few months as soon as I can scrape up the money.

    The blu ray is currently $10 on Amazon….

  48. Tino

    Wonder what kind of print it will be?

    I don't think AMC has a classic movie series of their own – this is likely a Fathom event. If they decide to show the latest and greatest version, a 4K DCP is now available.

    But the webpage article's speculation that it must be the director's cut because the time is listed at 130 minutes is ridiculous. The running time of the theatrical cut is 113 minutes and the running time of the director's cut is 116 minutes. Clearly that time isn't correct, but I don't think the incorrect time gives any indication about what version it will be. It seems more likely that the running time is inclusive of a short behind-the-scenes featurette, as Fathom events often include something along those lines.

  49. Hey guys, I was thinking about getting this and the box set of the TOS movies on blu. Yea? Nay? All I have now are ST:I DC, ST:II DC, ST:III CE, ST:IV and V and ST:VI DC dvd versions. Worth the upgrade?

  50. Yeah, I'd say so. Keep your DVDs for 1, 2 and 6 for the alternate cuts that aren't on the BD. They're not the best discs ever but they are an improvement over the DVDs. And they can be had cheap enough that I think it's worth it.

  51. Camper

    I mean for gosh sake. The uniforms look faded and orange-ish in the 2009 Blu-ray — when they were brand new and clearly supposed to be burgundy.

    Also was Target a sponsor for the movie in 1982– tie-ins perhaps?

    Target??

  52. Josh Steinberg

    I'm usually not a big fan of paying to see a DCP made from the same master as the disc I already own…but Wrath Of Khan is probably an exception to that rule.

    "No truer words….have ever been spoken."

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