Meet Bob Furmanek: HTF Golden Age 3-D Consultant

Mr. Furmanek is our official Golden Age 3-D Consultant 3 Stars

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Home Theater Forum is proud to present Film Historian Bob Furmanek. Mr. Furmanek is our official Golden Age 3-D Consultant who will be contributing content and answering member questions in our 3D Blu-ray forum.

We have provided his BIO below. Please feel free to use this thread to welcome Bob to this forum as well as ask any general questions you may have about his career.

Film historian Bob Furmanek has played an important behind the scenes role in film preservation for more than 30 years.
His first industry job was working at the highly respected John E. Allen film preservation lab in New Jersey. Bob handled nitrate print inspection, including original elements from WAY DOWN EAST and WEREWOLF OF LONDON. In addition, he worked with the handling and inspection of millions of feet of nitrate stock footage, dating back to the turn of the century.
In 1981, he was a research assistant on the David Wolper produced feature film, THIS IS ELVIS, for Warner Bros. Bob was entrusted with the security and handling of some one-of-a-kind 8mm footage taken of the controversial singer by a local police force during an appearance in 1957.
While in Hollywood in 1981, Bob met Dean Martin and began a ten year association. He produced several critically acclaimed Capitol Records re-issues of Dean’s music. One release, the CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, was awarded gold status by the RIAA. Dean was particularly pleased when Bob produced the re-issue of his classic 1955 album, SWINGIN’ DOWN YONDER. He added several other Dixieland tracks from Dean’s catalog, including the previously unreleased “Darktown Strutters Ball.” When presenting him with the new release shortly after his birthday in June 1991, Dean smiled and said “I always loved Dixieland music.”
In June 1982, Bob had a chance meeting on the back lot at Warner Bros. which has enriched his life immensely. He turned a corner and literally stumbled onto legendary entertainer Jerry Lewis while he was filming the movie SMORGASBORD. This lead to an ongoing friendship with Mr. Lewis which continues to this day. Over the next 20 years as Lewis’ personal archivist, Bob was responsible for discovering and cataloging many hidden treasures from his career. Among his finds was one of the earliest surviving color videotapes: a 1959 production of “The Jazz Singer” which aired on NBC and has just been restored for release on DVD. Bob also found a 16mm film which contained a complete performance of Martin and Lewis at New York’s Copacabana in 1954. His archival efforts have led to several retrospective shows, including a salute to Lewis at the American Museum of the Moving Image and a five part documentary series for the Disney Channel.
While living in Hollywood, Bob also became archivist to the Estates of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. He utilized his research expertise to locate many lost elements, including nearly 30 crates of original radio transcriptions from the 1940’s. In addition, he located the surviving 35mm nitrate film elements for AFRICA SCREAMS. Bob funded the 35mm restoration out of his own pocket, and later produced a special edition laser disc for Image Entertainment which was awarded “Best Supplemental Disc of the Year” by Video Magazine in 1988. He also produced a color restoration of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK for laser disc and located the long lost Supercinecolor elements to ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET CAPTAIN KIDD in England. Bob donated the materials to UCLA and the film was preserved in 2002. The restoration was released on DVD via the Warner Archive Series in 2011.
While working in various film vaults over the years, Bob discovered several important elements, including the 35mm nitrate camera negatives to MEET JOHN DOE (restored by UCLA in 1995) and the 35mm camera negative trims from the original color Star Trek pilot, THE CAGE. He was able to secure preservation by returning the un-marked footage to Gene Roddenberry at Paramount. Bob also located original nitrate 35mm materials for two Bela Lugosi films; THE DEVIL BAT and the Cinecolor feature SCARED TO DEATH which were released on laser disc by Lumivision in 1997.
In 1991, Bob co-authored ABBOTT AND COSTELLO IN HOLLYWOOD. Published by Perigee Books/Putnam Publishing, this highly detailed look at the making of Bud and Lou’s feature films received excellent reviews. Library Journal called it a “definitive guide to their 36 movies.” Film historian Leonard Maltin said “More details on the making of their films than any book I’ve ever seen” and Anthony Slide in Classic Images said “This is about as good a “Films of” book as it is possible to compile. It cannot be better. Highly recommended.”
Bob worked for Capitol Records in the early 1990’s and produced 32 CD re-issues, including the RIAA gold certified Louis Prima CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES. Other releases in the series included Ella Fitzgerald, Al Martino, The Kingston Trio, The Andrews Sisters, Kay Starr and Grand Funk Railroad. While doing research for the 3 disc FRANK SINATRA: THE CAPITOL YEARS set, Bob discovered a previously unknown recording of “One for My Baby” in the vaults.
In 1992, Bob began an eleven year effort to help save and restore a vintage movie palace: the 1929 Loew’s Jersey Theater in Jersey City, New Jersey. He produced several highly successful shows in the huge lobby in order to raise awareness of the theaters beauty and potential as a showcase for classic film. The historic theater was saved from the wrecker’s ball and with the aid of several industry engineers; 35mm projection capability was restored to the 3300 seat auditorium. The theater is still running classic film to this day.

In the early 1990’s, Bob began his most ambitious crusade to date; to locate, secure and preserve original dual-strip 35mm prints and elements from the Golden Age of 3-D motion pictures: 1952-1955. Forming the non-profit 3-D Film Archive, Bob worked tirelessly over the next decade tracking down and re-combining lost 3-D prints. He eventually built the largest, most complete Archive of vintage 35mm stereoscopic film elements in the world. His efforts led to the highly successful WORLD 3-D FILM EXPO in 2003 at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood and the second EXPO in 2006.

Today, Bob is President of the 3-D Film Archive and continues his ongoing efforts to save and restore lost 3-D materials. Most recently, the Archive helped to ensure preservation of the 1954 United Artists feature GOG and has provided important research materials and documentation to Warner Bros. on their 3-D library.

2012 will be a most exciting year for 3-D fans as the Archive makes preparations to share their stereoscopic film treasures with the world!

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3797 Comments

  1. Welcome to the forum and I'd like to ask a question. There has been a lot of talk on the forum about Universal releasing some of their monster films on blu-ray. Do you have any idea if some of them will be released in 3D? Specifically, Creature from the Black Lagoon and It Came from Outer Space.

  2. Another legend in the business attached to HTF! With your expertise and resources along with the other very notable and knowledgeable consultants, I would think that HTF continues to be a leader. I have certainly enjoyed your previous posts and always learn something from them. I look forward to many more in the future and your guidance through this era of 3D,

  3. Thank you very much for your warm welcome, it's a pleasure to join the team!
    As you know, I've been active on this site and have been a participating member for many years. I'm grateful for the opportunity to officially come on board and will be happy to answer any questions that I can. Of course, certain studio updates have to remain confidential. Even though I may be working on a project, I may not always be at liberty to discuss it. I hope you understand.
    My particular area of expertise is the Golden Age of 3-D Movies, from SELECTED VIEWS OF YOSEMITE VALLEY in 1922 to THE BUBBLE in 1966.
    I've also had the good fortune to work on a variety of different projects over the past 30 years and will be happy to answer any questions about those as well.
    So far as plans at Universal, I'm not aware of any developments with their 3-D library. They own six very high quality features from the Golden Age plus three entertaining shorts, including ones with Nat King Cole and Pinky Lee! They were also one of the few studios to produce trailers in 3-D. Five of their six features were intended for widescreen and would look spectacular on the new displays.
    Unfortunately, there are no plans for a third Expo at this time. We're focusing all of our energies on restoring the titles that we own. Look for some VERY exciting 3-D announcements on Blu-Ray in the very near future!
    Bob

  4. Hey…I know you! 🙂
    I wasn't able to attend either of the World 3-D Expos in LA, but I can say from the times that I ran double-system 3-D at the Lafayette that it is an extremely time consuming and expensive endeavor to undertake. Producing another festival such as they did would be an enormous task given the state of the materials.

  5. Are the 3-D materials any worse now than they were in 2003 and 2006?
    I thought the Expos alerted the studios to the viability of their 3-D films as marketable commodities, and facilitated the striking of new prints and some restoration.
    If a 3-D Expo could be done twice before, it can be done again.
    And again. And again. And again.
    So long as audiences turn out to see them.
    With the heightened awareness of classic 3-D now, as a result of the Expos, the progress of the 3-D film industry and its acceptance by the public, I should think another Expo would be more successful than the first two.
    Of course it takes effort, but what doesn't take effort in this business.
    ————
    Welcome, Bob Furmanek.

  6. Hi Bob! Welcome aboard! [​IMG]

    I was delighted to be reading a story in one of the NY tabloids this weekend about the release of the Jerry Lewis 1959 TV version of The Jazz Singer and see your name connected with that project! Very cool.

    It sounded like a pretty interesting audio about how you were able to piece together enough elements of that broadcast from the original 2" color tape, a B&W kinescope and separate audio recordings…

  7. Thank you Mike, I found that "Jazz Singer" color tape 26 years ago and have been patiently waiting to see it restored!
    I didn't work on the recent audio restoration. That was handled by the amazing David Crosthwaite at http://dcvideo.com/
    I agree Richard and when the time is right, I will do my absolute best to make it happen. Right now, my focus is on the restoration of materials that we own and plan to release this year.
    My interest in 3-D preservation began in the 1970's and I started aggressively looking for prints and elements in 1990. I'm in the process of writing a detailed article on the history of the Archive. In the meantime, here's a piece that was published in the Big Reel in November 1999.
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  8. Hey BOB. . . Great to see you are envolved here.
    I know you said you can't give any titles out. But you should be able to at least let us know that there will be releases of any of the 1950s 3D titles this year. That would certainly make those of us who are set up with 3D systems happy to look forward to.
    Matt Spero

  9. Hi Matt,
    Great to see you again!
    I can only say that I will personally be releasing some Golden Age material from the Archive. I can't say for certain anything will happen from the studios. I do know that WB is working on at least one, maybe two titles, as we speak…
    Bob

  10. Exciting news, Bob. I've got several questions, so I'll just fire away. I've seen that Sony has 3-D downloads on their PS3 store of The Mad Magician and Pardon My Backfire. Both pricey. Do you know if either is slated for Blu-ray release? Whatever happened to the Hondo restoration? I read about it several times, then . . . nothing. Is there any movement in the industry to do restorations of classic era films that can be shown in a modern digital 3-D theater, such as a Real-D equipped theater? Will low budget independent fair (fingers crossed: Robot Monster) get a fair shake on blu-ray? Looking forward to seeing your 3-D releases.

  11. Bob, the work you did on your Sinatra set is the BEST those tracks have ever sounded in digital form. Your compilation is apparently the only time the original session masters were used. I wish you had been involved in remastering all of the albums in their entirety. 🙂

  12. Greg: to answer your questions. I haven't heard anything definite about Sony's plans for Blu-Ray. The same with HONDO. The Wayne Estate has the film in a 3-D digital format but have only had two or three screenings.
    D-Cinema would be a natural for some of the classics (Wax, Dial M, Kiss Me Kate, Creature, etc) but I'm not aware of any plans at this time.
    I approached the copyright holder of ROBOT MONSTER and offered to fund a full restoration off the original negatives. Unfortunately, he declined.
    Chuck: all the credit for that Sinatra release goes to my brother Ron. My involvement on that 3 disc set was in the vaults doing preliminary research, Ron produced it and did all the restoration in the studio.
    Bob

  13. As those on this board become more aware of Mr. Furmanek, one point will become very obvious.

    There are few in the industry with more passion and knowledge of their subjects than he. When he believes in something he goes after it, tries to accomplish what needs to be done, and does so with integrity and professionalism.

    I couldn't be more pleased that those of you who may not have known who he is, are now being introduced.

    RAH

  14. Thank you very much, Mr. Harris. Your kind words are very much appreciated! I can remember when we first met on the Goldwyn lot as you were working on MY FAIR LADY. Those were some wonderful times! I'm still in touch with Mike H.
    Richard: INFERNO has been scanned at 2K and re-aligned shot by shot by the late Dan Symmes. There is a pristine, restored digital 3-D master ready to go…
    Bob

  15. I'm shocked to hear of Dan Symmes passing. I knew of him since 1982 or 1983 when I got a copy of Amazing 3-D, and I finally got to meet him at the second Hollywood 3-D Fest. He was very nice and I'm sad to hear he's gone. RIP, Dan.
    Greg

  16. Personally, I would like to see some golden age films released theatrically, as I am not sure when I will have a system capable of playing 3d disks. My guess is that, if they released Hondo theatrically, with enough of an advertising budget to let people know what it is, it would do surprisingly well at the box office. I think tha tJohn Wayne was voted 4th favorite male actor in 2011, over 30 years after his death.

  17. I know it was very short (less than two minutes) but I loved seeing the 3-D opening scenes for THE BIRDS shown at the Orlando Universal Studios attraction Alfred Hitchcock: The Art of Making Movies – (its starts at 8:40 into ) . That would be cool to see again on Blu-ray 3D. I think it was planned to be used for the movie before it was released but was scrapped.

  18. Bob Furmanek

    I never saw this newly filmed segment in 3-D but I'm told it was very well done.
    Bob

    I thought it was mentioned during the attraction that this was unreleased 3-D footage not new. I think the same was mentioned in The Unofficial Guide To Walt Disney World under the Universal Studios section. Maybe it was incorrect.

  19. When I saw this at Universal Studios, we were told before the clips were shown that DIAL M feature itself had never been seen in 3-D during its original run, which of course was incorrect. I don't think they said anything about the newer footage. A brief DIAL M CLIP was shown shrunken and windowboxed on a stadium sized screen. Just after the Dial M on-sceen murder occurs, the screen "tears open" as in a film effect, to transition to THE BIRDS in-studio clip, which filled the entire stadium sized screen. While fun, it was simply one continuous shot that was VERY gimmicky (so unlike DIAL M), and appeared to be shot on large format stock. The background actors shown in the montage were wearing early 60's attire, but I'm sure that was done to better tie this clip in with the original 1963 BIRDS feature.

  20. Bob Furmanek

    Thank you very much, Mr. Harris. Your kind words are very much appreciated! I can remember when we first met on the Goldwyn lot as you were working on MY FAIR LADY. Those were some wonderful times! I'm still in touch with Mike H.
    Richard: INFERNO has been scanned at 2K and re-aligned shot by shot by the late Dan Symmes. There is a pristine, restored digital 3-D master ready to go…
    Bob

    Thank you Mr. Furmanek, that is certainly great news. Great, forgotten movie.

  21. Bob, dont know if this has been adressed, but have you hear anthing on the Chaney version of Hunchback, the suplements that were added were wonderful, and i know that you are one to thank in that aspect, i was just wondering if it was being re worked for a 1080 presentation

  22. Richard: Dan worked very hard on the restoration of INFERNO. If it gets a 3-D BR release, I hope that Fox will use his new master.
    Dana: The credit for those stereo images on the HUNCHBACK project goes to Jack Theakston. I haven't heard any further news but I'll ask Jack to answer that question for you.
    Bob

  23. [​IMG]
    Inferno is overdue for rediscovery. People would gain a whole new appreciation for this noir and what stereoscopic lensmanship can accomplish as a story-telling tool if they could see it. One of my most-wanted films. Does Fox know about Dan Symme's master? Have you seen it? I'll bet it's impressive, knowing Dan Symmes standards.
    So far as I know, Inferno isn't even on Fox's radar anymore.
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  24. INFERNO is one of the best 3-D films of all time. It should be seen and available.
    I'm not sure if the current regime at Fox knows of his scene by scene restoration. It was done a few years ago.
    Here's a quote from Roy Ward Baker's autobiography:
    [​IMG]

  25. Nothing on that one, sorry! That's not to say I haven't looked into it.
    The elements do exist but the rights are a mess. American distributor Sam Sherman has certain domestic rights but his 3-D element is a 35mm dupe from a release print and not very good quality. To master this properly, the other distributor would need to provide better elements.
    Bob

  26. I've always wanted to see Frankenstein's Bloody Terror (La Marca del Hombre-lobo — Spain, 1968) in stereo. I'm assured it was well shot. It had a sensational and extravagant 3-D poster, although I don't have it.
    [​IMG]
    I need to start a thread on miscellaneous 3-D films of the 1960s on up.
    I'm fond of RUN FOR COVER (1995) by Richard W. Haines, who used to post here. A resourceful independent 3-D film shot on a shoestring. He sent me a nice field-sequential copy. It just doesn't work flat. You must know him, Bob.

  27. Is Inferno the one with a shot of a burning roof collapsing right into the camera? I think I may have seen it in the 80's when one L.A. station was showing films late on Saturday nights during the brief 3D revival. One had to buy the red and blue glasses at your local 7-11. There were several movies shown I haven't seen anywhere since.

  28. Yes, after a terrific fight sequence between Robert Ryan and William Lundigan where the two really go at it, without stunt doubles!
    There's also a collapsing roof in THE STRANGER WORE A GUN but that was never converted to red/blue anaglyph for TV viewing.
    Bob

  29. Bob, what is your opinion of the old StereoVision International system? Twin lens / single strip capture and twin lens / single projector. Every film shot with that system has problems, but I'm not sure if the system was responsible for the problems. What's your take on it?

  30. Stereovision had too many limitations. The filmmaker locked into a 1.37 aspect ratio being a major drawback. Even in that ratio, the use of an anamorphic lens was necessary to stretch the image out to the correct proportion.
    I much prefer the over/under Spacevision system. We're restoring THE BUBBLE right now from the original camera negative and the quality is outstanding.
    Bob

  31. Bob Furmanek

    Stereovision had too many limitations. The filmmaker locked into a 1.37 aspect ratio being a major drawback. Even in that ratio, the use of an anamorphic lens was necessary to stretch the image out to the correct proportion.

    You mean you prefer spherical over anamorphic 2 perf for 3-D?

    Bob Furmanek

    I much prefer the over/under Spacevision system. We're restoring THE BUBBLE right now from the original camera negative and the quality is outstanding.
    Bob

    Were you able to track down the Spacevision hardware? I thought there was only the one in existence. I gather you're using that?
    Love THE BUBBLE. That Rod Serling influence is a good thing.

  32. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/30#post_3896051
    Dana: The credit for those stereo images on the HUNCHBACK project goes to Jack Theakston. I haven't heard any further news but I'll ask Jack to answer that question for you.
    Bob

    Bob my appoligies to both you and Jack, for the mix-up, but some of what i have read in this thread along has me hopeful that one day we possibly soon will be seeing some classic 3D at Home

  33. I hope so too Dana!
    Richard, the over/under 2 perf Spacevision system is superior to the side by side, anamorphic Stereovision, IMHO.
    No Spacevision equipment is needed for restoring THE BUBBLE. We're doing direct scans off the camera negative and recombining in post.
    Bob

  34. Oh, that is a treat to see.
    I haven't seen THE BUBBLE look so clean, clear, and sharp as in those frames.
    SpaceVision was known as a dim process.
    Are you getting a brighter image via the scan than was possible with theatrical projection?
    What made the Spacevision lens superior to the Stereovision, do you think?
    You don't mind expounding, do ya?

  35. Sorry, but I really don't know much about the lens or the optics.
    We're scanning directly off the camera negative, cleaning and re-aligning each shot to make the 3-D perfect.
    It has never looked this good before!
    Bob
    PS – This frame scan has been downsized for sharing on-line. The hi-rez image looks even better.

  36. I believe Bob is referring to the Stereovision side-by-side format that was used to film THE STEWARDESSES. It had an anamorphic squeeze, but still only managed a 1.37:1 aspect ratio. I think Stereovision eventually had a system that was also over/under for a 2.35:1 projection ratio, as did Arrivision and several others. These systems would have been used for the whole 80's 3-D revival including Comin' at Ya!, Friday the 13th III, Amityville Horror 3-D, Jaws 3-D, etc.
    All the examples of 80's 3-D films that I've seen transferred to HD (Jaws 3-D and Friday the 13th) seem to suffer in comparison to that still of The Bubble. Dunno if that's down to optics or what.
    An old Starlog book had an interview with Murray Lerner who made Sea Dream with the Spacevision system. It has a quote from him saying that of all the 3-D systems he did test footage with, Spacevision's was the sharpest. Andy Warhol's Frankenstein was also shot with Spacevision, and I assume that Oboler's Domo Arigato may have been as well.
    There are some good movies out on blu-ray 3D right now, but I'm most excited about some of these older features finally showing up. I can finally retire some of my old field sequential, um, "found" DVD's. 🙂

  37. FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN does have very good 3-D, most of the time. The close-up shots are extremely hard on the eyes and this would need a shot by shot alignment to make it watchable.
    Tom, those two titles are owned by Paramount and I have not heard of any interest on their part to mine their 3-D treasures. They are very well photographed and would be relatively easy to master in HD.
    Bob

  38. Bob Furmanek

    FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN does have very good 3-D, most of the time. The close-up shots are extremely hard on the eyes and this would need a shot by shot alignment to make it watchable.
    Tom, those two titles are owned by Paramount and I have not heard of any interest on their part to mine their 3-D treasures. They are very well photographed and would be relatively easy to master in HD.
    Bob

    Your Jerry Lewis connection had got me wondering about his 3D movie…
    It will be interesting to see which films are still capable of finding a strong audience, once the golden age movies start turning up in 3D Blu-ray!

  39. Adam Gregorich

    This thread is a fascinating read so far.  Thanks Bob, glad to have you sharing your expertise.  I'm not familiar with many of the early 3D efforts, but I would love to be able to experience them on Blu-ray!

    You're very welcome, Adam. When the studios begin mining the stereoscopic treasures in their vaults, you've got a lot of terrific 3-D entertainment to look forward to!
    Here's an example of the talent waiting to be seen again in the 3-D films of the 1950's: John Wayne, Rita Hayworth, Kathryn Grayson, Howard Keel, Bob Fosse, Robert Mitchum, Linda Darnell, Jack Palance, Edward G. Robinson, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Jane Russell, Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Victor Mature, Robert Stack, Jose Ferrer, Vincent Price, Joan Fontaine, Phil Silvers, Randolph Scott, Charles Bronson, Karl Malden, Ernest Borgnine, Rhonda Fleming, Robert Ryan, Lee Marvin, Virginia Mayo, Lee J. Cobb, Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Rock Hudson, etc.
    Great directors and cinematographers worked on these films, including John Alton, Raoul Walsh, Douglas Sirk, Roy Baker, George Sidney, William Cameron Menzies, Jack Arnold, Budd Boetticher, Charles Roscher, Hal Wallis, Alfred Hitchcock and many more.
    Bob

  40. Bob Furmanek

    You're very welcome, Adam. When the studios begin mining the stereoscopic treasures in their vaults, you've got a lot of terrific 3-D entertainment to look forward to!
    Here's an example of the talent waiting to be seen again in the 3-D films of the 1950's: John Wayne, Rita Hayworth, Kathryn Grayson, Howard Keel, Bob Fosse, Robert Mitchum, Linda Darnell, Jack Palance, Edward G. Robinson, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Jane Russell, Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Victor Mature, Robert Stack, Jose Ferrer, Vincent Price, Joan Fontaine, Phil Silvers, Randolph Scott, Charles Bronson, Karl Malden, Ernest Borgnine, Rhonda Fleming, Robert Ryan, Lee Marvin, Virginia Mayo, Lee J. Cobb, Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Rock Hudson, etc.
    Great directors and cinematographers worked on these films, including John Alton, Raoul Walsh, Douglas Sirk, Roy Baker, George Sidney, William Cameron Menzies, Jack Arnold, Budd Boetticher, Charles Roscher, Hal Wallis, Alfred Hitchcock and many more.
    Bob

    Hollywood royalty. I don't want the great accomplishments of these people to be forgotten, including the 3D work that they did. This collection of talent NEEDS to be preserved, I hope the studios remember that today's motion picture industry stands on the shoulders of these giants.

  41. I agree Richard, and it also dis-spells the myth that 3-D movies of the 1950's were low budget productions. Sure there were some, but out of 50 features produced domestically between 1952-1955, most were quality productions with good casts and above average production credits.
    Having seen about 40 of them in 3-D, I can state that the quality of the stereoscopic cinematography is, for the most part, very good. The occasional convergence and registration issues can easily be fixed in post. That's what we're doing with the titles in our library.
    Bob

  42. 😕

    Bob Furmanek

    FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN does have very good 3-D, most of the time. The close-up shots are extremely hard on the eyes and this would need a shot by shot alignment to make it watchable.
    Tom, those two titles are owned by Paramount and I have not heard of any interest on their part to mine their 3-D treasures. They are very well photographed and would be relatively easy to master in HD.
    Bob

    FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN was broadcast in 3D a couple years ago on the BBC, I believe, and it looks good. The cyan & amber anaglyph effect works surprisingly well too (colors work better too).
    [​IMG]

  43. Mr. Furmanek,
    The introductory post in this thread mentions the Archive's role in preserving GOG. What if anything can you share about that work? When this title was shown at the World 3-D Expo(s) several years ago, the audience was told that we were seeing the only surviving print of one of the "eyes". The colors on that side (left or right? I don't remember) were badly faded. Has restoration meant simply preventing further deterioration? Or have efforts been made to restore any of the lost color, and if so how successful were they?

  44. Brian and James: I appreciate the anaglyph that you created from the scan I posted of our restoration on THE BUBBLE. However, at this time, it's still a work in progress and I'd rather hold off on sharing any 3-D images until our work is complete. I hope you understand!
    I found that faded left side print of GOG about 15 years ago in Atlanta. I later discovered that it was the only surviving element on that side. I can't tell you how nervous I was running it at the two Expo's but I felt it was important to raise awareness of the need for preservation. Director Herbert L. Strock was in attendance in 2003 and was able to share his work with a sold-out and very enthusiastic audience. He passed away two years after that screening.
    I'm very happy to state that at long last, the faded print was scanned in HD by the copyright holder and will eventually be color corrected to match the right eye. There are no further plans with the title at this time but at least it's been preserved in 3-D!
    Bob

  45. Well that's good news on GOG at least Bob. I see it's out now through the Warner Archives or another MOD source, but it's a darn shame they won't start giving us some 3D versions this way.
    I don't see why 3D Blu Ray MOD's wouldn't be possible? I understand this may be a niche market numbers-wise to the studios, but I for one am wiling to pay a premium for classic 3D, just an many seem to be for the Archives titles.
    I came over here from the Classic Horror Film Board at your suggestion to add my voice to those calling for classic 3D releases. You say that studio reps do look here some, so here's another one asking for more (any!) Golden age 3D.
    SAM33

  46. Oh, and I meant to add (if it's of any real help or consequence) that while I'll seriously buy ANY classic 50's title in 3D, my most wanted in rough order of preference would be:
    IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE
    CREATURE AND REVENGE OF THE CREATURE
    HOUSE OF WAX
    GOG
    GORILLA AT LARGE
    THE MAZE
    PHANTOM OF THE RUE MORGUE
    (hey, I'm a classic horror and sci-fi fan, what can I say?)
    ANY of the cartoons (do have WORKING FOR PEANUTS already) such as ACE OF SPACE, BOO MOON, etc.
    DIAL M FOR MURDER
    INFERNO
    FORT TI
    HONDO
    If you make them I will buy…
    SAM33

  47. Thanks Stewart, expressing your interest here is the best way to have your voice heard.
    I've restored and preserved BOO MOON from the original YCM successive exposure elements. We'll definitely include that in one of our releases this year!
    Bob

  48. Bob, do you have any insight about the cyan/ amber anaglyph format? Such as your opinions, if it works "better" for modern tvs, etc. When did these colors start being used instead of cyan/magenta? Also, any idea who prepared the cyan/amber broadcast version of FFF?

  49. Ben: To be honest with you, I have no idea! I never gave much thought to anaglyph, especially after November 1978 when I saw my first vintage feature in Polaroid. From that point forward, I considered anaglyph a detriment to the enjoyment of 3-D.
    There's a brilliant engineer working with us on our 3-D restorations. His name is Greg Kintz and I'm going to ask if he can answer your question.
    Bob

    1. Bob, may I ask if there is new tools being developed for restoration of 3D films ?
      Maybe some algorithms used in 2D to 3D movies conversion could help. This could leads to new tools even for 2D restorations, since the motion estimations and frame comparisons used to digitally restore missing parts, in 2D films, use 2D algorithms instead of 3D.

  50. Bob Cashill

    Love it or hate it, FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN has eye-popping 3D. Almost literally. 🙂 Just about my favorite 3D experience in a theater (NY's Film Forum, circa 1996).

    I saw this at a first-run house in Philadelphia when it was first released and remember it being a real hoot with definitely some of the most unsubtle 3D I've ever experienced – including
    one scene with an entrail-oozing body on an operating table hanging right in front of my face.
    I also have memories of bats flying out of the screen and behind my head (though maybe this is just my age-fogged brain speaking because I have no idea how this could have been done).

  51. Stephen_J_H

    My question for Bob is one I'm sure many would like to ask: will there be a 3D Film Expo 3?

    I flew 3000 miles for the 2003 Expo – a truly great experience as I also got to see "How the West Was Won" in Cinerama at the Cinerama Dome
    the same week.
    I'm hoping for something on the east coast – perhaps at the Lafayette Theatre in Suffern as i'd really like to go there but haven't seen anything
    playing there which I'm willing to drive 2 1/2 hours for.
    (I know the Lafayette's already had a mini-fest – showing many of the same films which were shown at the first 3D fest.)

  52. Thanks for the kind remarks, Bob. Working directly from the OCN certainly makes the job a lot easier.
    Regarding the previous question of anaglyphs:
    Each anaglyph (color differential 3-D encoding) format has it's own strengths and weaknesses. A given anaglyph format should not be judged on a single encoding, as how a given feature is pre-processed, encoded and what delivery format is used (DVD, BluRay, broadcast, etc) will help determine the end product's quality. Aside from the obvious conflicts that comes whenever encoding a full color image as anaglyph, I would define anaglyph as a very fragile format. When the color signal is even slightly degraded, the result is an increase in "ghosting" with anaglyph, which already can have issues in this area. To date, there are no consumer delivery video formats which offer uncompromised color, as this normally is an area where the human eye is forgiving, so consumer video formats (analog and digital) have been designed to exploit that.
    Speaking in general terms on all three major anaglyph variants, the red/cyan anaglyph has been most prominent type, and tends to offer the best separation. The red lens is typically used for the left eye with today's anaglyph, although some encoded their anaglyphs as red lens / right eye. Slight variations of red/cyan included red/green and red/blue.
    ColorCode (on in non-branded terms: yellow/dark blue anaglyph) was designed to be quasi-2D friendly, but in practice this is often not the case. This is what was used for the Ch 4 UK anaglyph telecasts of "Flesh for Frankenstein" and "Friday the 13th Part III" a few years back before 3DTVs were common.
    Green/Magenta anaglyph 3-D gained a brief popularity by the late John Lowry under the brand "Trioscopics". This was used for the first 3D anaglyph Bluray releases of Coraline, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and My Bloody Valentine to name a few titles. Green/magenta was touted as having a better left/right color balance, which sometimes was the case. But when compared to red/cyan encodings, green/magenta tended to have slightly increased ghosting. It is worth noting different subject material may occasionally lean one way or the other, which is why I try to keep these more as generalized observations.
    But in the end, I pretty much share the same view on anaglyph as Bob has. Whenever one is exposed to the superior Polaroid process, anaglyph is a bit tough to go back to. Some have felt anaglyph with video has been a necessary evil or acceptable downgrade, while others believe it has fostered a negative view of 3-D. For example- if someone has only been exposed to anaglyph, what would they think of 3-D? Thankfully with today's new 3DTV formats, these previous arguments and need for anaglyph for the most part is now moot.

  53. Bob Furmanek

    …Director Herbert L. Strock was in attendance in 2003 and was able to share his work with a sold-out and very enthusiastic audience. He passed away two years after that screening…

    Yes! The guest lists at the two Expos were truly incredible:
    Joe Dante
    Leonard Maltin
    Ray Bradbury
    Patricia Hitchcock
    Jane Russell
    Julie Adams
    Lori Nelson
    Kathryn Grayson
    Kathleen Hughes
    William Schallert
    Paul Picerni
    Biff Elliott
    and many others…
    …oh, and some guy named Bob Furmanek… 😀
    Mr. Bradbury was awarded the keys to the city in a very moving appearance.
    There were also some famous folks among the audience (Quentin Tarantino, John Landis, Bob Burns, etc.) My friend and I had the honor of sitting next to Mr. Landis at one screening , who was kind enough to share with us some stories about the stereoscopic screen tests he did for the abandoned '80s remake of "Creature from the Black Lagoon".
    Good times indeed.

  54. The 3-D Expos are highlights in my moviegoing life. Unforgettable. The classic 3-D films are what cinema is all about. One of the pleasures for me was meeting director Richard Fleischer. I remember QT sitting more or less in the center standing up and shouting to JD a dozen rows back that he had just bought a 16mm print of Gremlins and JD, after waiting a beat, responds "I didn't know there were any 16mm prints of Gremlins." Or something like that.
    I wish the Expo would press a DVD of the celebrity interviews. They were all videotaped. It would be a nice souvenir. The audience was videotaped, too. My face at the first Expo is on the poster for the second Expo. I hate having my picture taken. While standing on line outside, mingling in the lobby, waiting at the snackbar, sitting in our seats, the cameramen with mounted flood just never let up. I brought a little pocket mirror in with me to bounce light back at them but in the end I reconsidered.

  55. I wish I'd been able to attend either of the Hollywood Expos. While I was very happy with the mini-expo of 10 3-D films I staged at the Lafayette in 2004, seeing them with some the listed celebrities in Hollywood would have been very special. It's a shame some of those prints are no longer available for screening in double-system format.
    EDIT – And I'd be remiss if I didn't mention Bob's invaluable help and inspiration for the Lafayette show. In addition to supplying the prints for a number of the features and virtually all of the shorts, he did intros for the majority of the shows and was a great ambassador for us that weekend as I was in the booth almost the entire time.

  56. Greg, thank you for sharing that information about the various anaglyph systems.
    Mr. Kintz is the engineer working on all of our 3-D restorations. He's extremely knowledgeable and VERY talented. I know that the Archive's work is in good hands when he tackles a project!
    The two Expo's were a culmination of many years of work for me that began in the late 1970's. I provided 21 of the 34 features screened at the first Expo. The other 13 prints were newly struck by Columbia and Warner Bros.
    There were SO many highlights and touching moments. When I was introduced to Biff Elliot and he learned I was the one who had found and re-combined the separated left/right prints of I, THE JURY, he became emotional and gave me a big hug. His family was with him and told me how much that screening meant to him.
    Wonderful moments.
    Bob

  57. Bob Furmanek

    Greg, thank you for sharing that information about the various anaglyph systems.
    Mr. Kintz is the engineer working on all of our 3-D restorations. He's extremely knowledgeable and VERY talented. I know that the Archive's work is in good hands when he tackles a project!
    The two Expo's were a culmination of many years of work for me that began in the late 1970's. I provided 21 of the 34 features screened at the first Expo. The other 13 prints were newly struck by Columbia and Warner Bros.
    There were SO many highlights and touching moments. When I was introduced to Biff Elliot and he learned I was the one who had found and re-combined the separated left/right prints of I, THE JURY, he became emotional and gave me a big hug. His family was with him and told me how much that screening meant to him.
    Wonderful moments.
    Bob

    I know Greg from the days of the field-sequential 3-D videos at 30fps per eye. Yes you had flicker but none of the terrible colors and 3-D compared to anaglyph

  58. Bob – GREAT news about BOO MOON! I'm really getting excited about whatever you may put out later this year.
    Yeah, FRENCH LINE and KISS ME KATE would be great too.
    As I'm sure many here do, I have old field-sequentials and anaglyphs of some of these, including FRENCH LINE, but once you've tasted "real" 3D at home, there's no going back. I have a JVC projector set-up and for me it's working great.
    I SO wanted to go to the 2 west-coast 3D fests, but just couldn't swing it. The only classic I've ever seen theatrically in real 2-projector sync was DIAL M, which was just great. This was back in the 80's, and I vividly remember being warned before the show that the two sides had come from different sources, and had slugs in different places replacing damaged frames to keep them in synch, so not to freak out when you momentarily went "blind" in one eye or the other from time-to-time!
    SAM33

  59. Bob – GREAT news about BOO MOON! I'm really getting excited about whatever you may put out later this year.
    Yeah, FRENCH LINE and KISS ME KATE would be great too.
    As I'm sure many here do, I have old field-sequentials and anaglyphs of some of these, including FRENCH LINE, but once you've tasted "real" 3D at home, there's no going back. I have a JVC projector set-up and for me it's working great.
    I SO wanted to go to the 2 west-coast 3D fests, but just couldn't swing it. The only classic I've ever seen theatrically in real 2-projector sync was DIAL M, which was just great. This was back in the 80's, andI vividly remember being warned before the show that the two sides had come from different sources, and had slugs in different places replacing damaged frames to keep them in synch, so not to freak out when you momentarily went "blind" in one eye or the other from time-to-time!
    SAM33

  60. SAM33

    Bob – GREAT news about BOO MOON! I'm really getting excited about whatever you may put out later this year.
    Yeah, FRENCH LINE and KISS ME KATE would be great too.
    As I'm sure many here do, I have old field-sequentials and anaglyphs of some of these, including FRENCH LINE, but once you've tasted "real" 3D at home, there's no going back. I have a JVC projector set-up and for me it's working great.
    I SO wanted to go to the 2 west-coast 3D fests, but just couldn't swing it. The only classic I've ever seen theatrically in real 2-projector sync was DIAL M, which was just great. This was back in the 80's, andI vividly remember being warned before the show that the two sides had come from different sources, and had slugs in different places replacing damaged frames to keep them in synch, so not to freak out when you momentarily went "blind" in one eye or the other from time-to-time!
    SAM33

    I saw DIAL M at the NYC Film Forum in dual-projection 3-D in the 90's and the picture was excelent.

  61. GregK

    Aside from the obvious conflicts that comes whenever encoding a full color image as anaglyph, I would define anaglyph as a very fragile format.

    You know you are dealing with someone who is used to speaking with fellow experts when he writes a sentence like this. My guess would be that the "conflicts" come from the different tints, but I do not know why there wouldn't be conflicts dealing with a b&w image. Oh well, I enjoy learning from people like GregK who write here even if I do not always understand everything they say.

  62. Robert Harris' recent review of HUGO touched on an aspect of 3-D movies that is completely lost in a flat viewing. I posted these comments in his review thread and wanted to share them here as well.

    What makes Hugo special in 3D is not things coming out at the audience as in 1953, but rather the atmosphere, and the fact that you can see and "feel" dust in the air of the Paris train station.

    The superb and subtle stereoscopic cinematography of such films as HONDO, SECOND CHANCE, I THE JURY, MISS SADIE THOMPSON, DIAL M FOR MURDER, TAZA-SON OF COCHISE and THE GLASS WEB are excellent examples of restraint and effectiveness in the three-dimensional process. They all accomplish what you describe above; they bring you INTO the story in a way that is unique to the 3-D movie experience. Robert Ryan and his desperate effort to survive in the desert (INFERNO) is an outstanding example of this cinematic technique. Of course, this immersive aspect is sadly absent when you see these films flat. Scorcese understands this and screened several vintage 3-D films for his cast and crew before the start of production.
    Of the 50 domestic 3-D productions photographed between 1952-1954, the filmmakers – for the most part – respected the "stereo window" and did not resort to gimmicks in order to enhance the process. The only studio guilty of excessive exploitation would have been Columbia, and more specifically the William Castle/Sam Katzman productions. However, for every film that was guilty of throwing an over abundance of objects at the camera (FORT TI, CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER, MAN IN THE DARK, SPOOKS) there were many, many others which utilized great restraint in their use of the process.
    Everybody remembers the famous paddleball sequence in HOUSE OF WAX. It was there for a very specific reason: that sequence was immediately following the intermission point. Director Andre deToth felt the barker was an effective way to bring the audience back into the story. In fact, in the following scene Vincent Price comments, "We won't need him once we're established." How true!
    The overuse of gimmicks became commonplace in the 1970's and 1980's with such movies as COMIN' AT YA, TREASURE OF THE FOUR CROWNS, FRIDAY THE 13TH 3-D, JAWS 3-D and ANDY WARHOL'S FRANKENSTEIN.
    Bob

  63. Wonderful explanation, Bob. I think it was brought home to me most effectvely in Dial 'M' for Murder. I had seen it on TV, and it was fine, effective, a good version of the play I had also seen performed. But when I saw it in 3D during the 1980s 3D renaissance, I was astounded by how much 3D added depth. That rather cramped-seeming flat that Kelly and Milland were living in now didn't seem so small any more. It seemed fitting to a well-to-do couple and the whole film opened up for me. Hard to explain but it certainly convinced me how effective 3D could be not just as a gimmick but as a story-enhancing tool.

  64. A terrific post Mr. Furmanek.
    I would, however, respectfully disagree about categorizing MAN IN THE DARK among the most gimmicky of Columbia's efforts. I only remember a few surgical tools, a cigar, and a gun breaking the screen plane. Otherwise, I consider this a highly underrated and unfairly maligned Noir. It was one of my favorites at Expo I and I was disappointed that it didn't make it to Expo II.
    Yes it was low budget, and yes production was rushed in order to beat HOUSE OF WAX to the box office. But Columbia still pulled off a very enjoyable little piece of Noir. Edmond O'Brien and Audrey Totter are both excellent. And the infamous roller coaster scene, criticized by many for its use of rear projection, still works for me somehow.
    There was a LOT of great Noir among the Golden Age 3-D titles: MAN IN THE DARK, THE GLASS WEB, I THE JURY, FLIGHT TO TANGIER, SECOND CHANCE, DANGEROUS MISSION, …) In fact, there is truly something for everyone's taste among the 50 titles you mentioned. Comedy, Drama, Westers, Film Noir, Musicals, …
    For the first time in history, there is an opportunity for these films to be enjoyed by the general public in the best possible presentation, better in some cases than they were first exhibited. The technology is here. 3-D Blu-ray is mainstream. To the studios who hold the Golden Age titles: please make them available to us. We WILL buy them.

  65. I've seen MAN IN THE DARK flat and found it a fun if somewhat cheesy noir. I'd LOVE to see it in 3D as I think the film would be really enhanced, regardless of how well executed the stereoscopic effect really is. I have an original one-sheet poster for it.
    I like the whole pantheon of 3D and don't mind the occasional "in your face" film as well as the more subtle depth-oriented efforts.
    I just got to see MAD MAGICIAN in the Playstation version this weekend, and found it to be a lot more fun than I remembered.
    Again, it's a Columbia schlocker and HOUSE OF WAX ripoff and has its share of "face" moments, but for we who love 3D it's still fun, with Vincent Price and all the stage gimmicks.
    This is actually the first vintage full feature in the new digital format I've managed to get for my home theater. Not even 1080p frame packed, rather side-by-side 720, but still very satisfying. Just whetted my appetite for more.
    PLEASE, bring 'em on!
    SAM33

  66. James, you're absolutely right. One of the strengths of the 3-D catalog from the Golden Age is the variety of styles and genres. There truly is something for everybody and that's one reason why a series of Blu-rays would allow the consumer to build a interesting and diverse 3-D collection.
    Each studio had their own policy towards the handling of 3-D in the 1950's. Paramount and RKO were the most conservative with a minimal of off-screen effects. In fact, you could watch any of the RKO's flat and not even realize you were seeing a movie composed for depth, unless you count Jane Russel's natural talents.
    Universal-International and MGM would fall in the middle. In one case, Jack Arnold wisely decided to place them all in one sequence of THE GLASS WEB, a beautifully photographed and forgotten film with Edward G. Robinson. When John Forsythe finds a dead body, he wanders the street in a daze and is hit with a barrage of 3-D missiles. It's an effective sequence and satisfies those who are looking for the gimmicks.
    MGM took no chances with KISS ME KATE. For the 3-D release, they had a specially filmed sequence at the beginning of the stage show with various characters tossing items at the audience, including confetti. I'm pretty sure this brief sequence is missing in the current, flat DVD.
    Warner Bros. (with the exception of DIAL M and THE MOONLIGHTER) and Columbia were at the other end of the scale and went for the gimmickry. Shot for shot, the most gimmicks ever to be found in one single film would go to either of the three Columbia shorts; Spooks, Pardon my Backfire and Down the Hatch.
    The three William Castle/Sam Katzman titles (Fort Ti, Drums of Tahiti and Jesse James vs. the Daltons) are full of gimmicks, although still not as bad as the average 1980's 3-D film. MAN IN THE DARK is well done and is one of the less gimmicky of the Columbia titles, but you've still got the flower pot, cigar dotting the eye, birds in the empty house, the spider in the dream sequence, the POV during the surgery, the gun during the auto chase, and there may be one or two others that I'm forgetting.
    When you read the contemporary reviews for 3-D films during that period, you'll see the dilemma faced by producers. If they piled on the gimmickry, the critics always complained. If they released a film that was beautifully photographed with superb composition for depth but no off-screen effects, the critics wandered where the gimmicks were and said the movie does not take advantage of the 3-D process. It was a no win situation!
    Bob

  67. JamesNelson

    For the first time in history, there is an opportunity for these films to be enjoyed by the general public in the best possible presentation, better in some cases than they were first exhibited. The technology is here. 3-D Blu-ray is mainstream. To the studios who hold the Golden Age titles: please make them available to us. We WILL buy them.

    I could not have said it better!
    For the past 57 years, the only way (other than the occasional Polaroid theatrical revival) to see some of these films in 3-D were via the terrible anaglyph conversions created for television and the 8mm home movie market in the 1970's. Films such as Creature from the Black Lagoon, The Maze, Miss Sadie Thompson and even Robot Monster are FAR superior in their original Polaroid 3-D versions. With the current widescreen Blu-ray displays, the public has the chance to see these films in a quality equal to, or surpassing, the original theatrical experience.
    In our case, we are doing scene by scene correction to eliminate any alignment, sizing or convergence issues. When our work is done, the Golden Age titles from the 3-D Film Archive are going to truly look better than they ever have before.
    Widescreen is an important element to these films. Of the 50 Golden Age domestic titles, at least 30 were composed and intended for widescreen exhibition with aspect ratios ranging from 1.66 up to 2.1. They have not been seen in widescreen since their original theatrical play-dates.
    With the current technology, releasing a film intended for 3-D in a flat version would be the same as mastering a color film in black and white or a widescreen film in pan and scan. It should not be done!
    Bob

  68. Bob: When might some of these titles become available? And will there be any revivals at local theaters? Or is that just impractical because of the lack of proper equipment?
    I don't have a home 3D set up, and am not likely to get one, and so I'm afraid I'm going to miss out on all of these treasures that you're working on….

  69. benbess

    I don't have a home 3D set up, and am not likely to get one, and so I'm afraid I'm going to miss out on all of these treasures that you're working on….

    By no means am I an expert but I think home 3-D is going to either die or become a fairly standard option on a TV so while you might not have 3-D now, maybe the TV that you buy in 5 (or however many) years will have it.

  70. benbess

    Bob: When might some of these titles become available? And will there be any revivals at local theaters? Or is that just impractical because of the lack of proper equipment?
    .

    The ability to properly project dual-strip interlocked 35mm is a lost art these days. Any theatrical exhibition of our titles will be via D-Cinema.
    I'm meeting with a potential distributor this week to discuss. So far, no deals have been signed and I'll keep you updated.
    Bob

  71. Bob Furmanek

    The ability to properly project dual-strip interlocked 35mm is a lost art these days. Any theatrical exhibition of our titles will be via D-Cinema.
    I'm meeting with a potential distributor this week to discuss. So far, no deals have been signed and I'll keep you updated.
    Bob

    Well, I'm sure this unlikely, but I hope you can come to Louisville and show some of these films! We have a very well run independent local theater, The Baxter. It has 8 screens, and still shows revival films sometimes from 35mm prints. They also show first run films, including 3D films digitally.
    http://www.village8.com/baxter_home.htm
    And it says this on their site:
    "IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
    Baxter Avenue Filmworks is now one of the only theatres in the state of Kentucky to use the Dolby System and quite possibly the only theatre to utilize specifically the Christie CP2000 SB projector which is used primarily in very large auditoriums with long throw distances that have multi-tiered balconies and 1,000s of seats. There is no doubt that patrons who see the digital and 3D films at Baxter will see the best quality image that is currently available in theatres."
    I think their largest theater holds about 300, which is why they are proud of this machine.
    We also have a local film society:
    http://louisvillefilm.org/
    Finally, the University of Louisville where I teach has a small film studies program.
    Again, I know it's unlikely, but if you're considering taking your show on the road, perhaps you could contact the people at the Baxter and see if by any chance something could be worked out…
    Best, Ben
    PS Louisville is a city of about 900,000.

  72. I've been meaning to visit the Baxter sometime soon. The Dolby system is probably the most subtle anaglyph system available, and I think the Baxter is the only one anywhere near me that uses it. I haven't seen Dolby 3-D yet, but I've read some positive comments on it. Makes me wonder why Dolby hasn't licensed it for home use.

  73. pinknik

    I've been meaning to visit the Baxter sometime soon. The Dolby system is probably the most subtle anaglyph system available, and I think the Baxter is the only one anywhere near me that uses it. I haven't seen Dolby 3-D yet, but I've read some positive comments on it. Makes me wonder why Dolby hasn't licensed it for home use.

    Another Louisville member! Good to see.
    The Baxter is my favorite theater. It's clean, reasonable, they don't show ads before the movie, good sound and projection practices (no ear bleeds, bright enough). It's not magic or amazing, just normal, common sense stuff–until you go to a Rave theater and you see what a chain is like.

  74. I would LOVE to visit the area and the Baxter sounds like a wonderful theater!
    Let me see how things develop over the next few months. There was some talk of taking "Treasures from the 3-D Film Archive" on tour to various Archives, theaters and museums around the country.
    Thank you for the very kind invitation!
    Bob

  75. I know Pete is on the forum, so my question to both of you is whether there's any chance for some 3-D again at the Lafayette. Their festival in 2004 was my introduction to the theater, and there may have been some since but that's my only time to have seen those classics in the right format. Of course there is Film Forum, and I'm simply remiss in not getting down there like I should. Time to turn a new leaf on that.

  76. Not at the present, I'm afraid. We did, in addition to the 2004 fest, single showings of Kiss Me Kate, House of Wax and "3-D Follies", which was similar to what Bob mentions above as "Treasures". This was a terrific program of Bob's creation with a collection of rare and unusual 3-D shorts.
    We are set up with Real-D digital 3-D now, in addition to our regular 35mm setup, so you may see some again if the studios make them available.

  77. Those are great shots!
    Of all the theaters which presented dual-strip, the Lafayette was my favorite. Beautiful surroundings, a nice l-o-n-g auditorium which was perfect for 3-D and top-notch projection. Pete Apruzzese (and the staff at the Egyptian in Hollywood) were the best in the booth that I ever had the pleasure to work with.
    I can still remember walking in when Pete was test-running KISS ME KATE. I put the glasses on from the back of the theater and said "WOW." It looked spectacular!
    When we have our material ready for D-cinema, the Lafayette will be at the top of my list.
    Bob

  78. Thanks, Bob. It was a big deal to get that 3-D installation just right. I clearly remember you walking in while Kate was running and it pleased me to no end to hear that it looked good. I was too close to it to know whether or not it really worked. Unfortunately, my main memory of that weekend (and the 3 weeks leading up to it) is exhaustion 🙂 . I've never been as tired before or since while running shows. The sensation of needing to do everything twice took over a week to go away after it was done.

  79. Pete, I remember you were sweating even more than usual for that weekend!

    dana martin

    Bob, dont know if this has been adressed, but have you hear anthing on the Chaney version of Hunchback, the suplements that were added were wonderful, and i know that you are one to thank in that aspect, i was just wondering if it was being re worked for a 1080 presentation

    My good friend Jack Theakston worked on that set. He's currently working 24/7 on a theater project and doesn't get to visit here too often these days. I asked about Blu-ray plans for the HUNCHBACK and here's what he said:
    The Image edition of HUNCHBACK was produced several years ago. The initial transfer was done in HD, but obviously dropped down to SD from there. The source material was a 1926 Show-At-Home print, completely tinted, so the quality is as good as possible with that film (no 35mm elements exist). Judging from what we had, HD might offer some slight definition improvement, but not much. So no, I don't think there are any plans to revisit that one, but you never know.
    Bob

  80. Bob –
    I was wondering about who may own the rights to and what the status might be on some of the early shorts like the Pete Smith AUDIOSCOPICS and THIRD DIMENSIONAL MURDER (still MGM?), TIME FOR BEANY, and A SOLID EXPLANATION?
    I have passable anaglyphics of these, and find them all enjoyable. I know the Smiths always were anaglyphic, but I assume they could be converted to digital 3D? Love to have nice copies of these.
    SAM33

  81. Originally Posted by benbess /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/90#post_3899130
    Another Louisville member! Good to see.
    The Baxter is my favorite theater. It's clean, reasonable, they don't show ads before the movie, good sound and projection practices (no ear bleeds, bright enough). It's not magic or amazing, just normal, common sense stuff–until you go to a Rave theater and you see what a chain is like.

    Chalk up another Louisville area lurker. I don't get to visit The Baxter as often as I would like since I live in Jeffersontown (next-door to a multiplex where I have had to complain to the manager after every one of the last half-dozen shows I've seen there). I do wish The Baxter had a bit more slant on the floor — my neck gets a bit stiff from looking up at the screen. But in every other respect I always enjoy attending.

    Sure do miss The Vogue in St. Matthews, though.

    And to keep it on-topic, I'm a 3-D and Cinerama buff from the old days, and I'm ready to commit to day-one purchases of any 1950s 3-D classics I can get my hands on.

  82. Bob,
    Do you have the rights to Doom Town?
    Also, what can you tell us about the "missing" blast footage…has any of it been recovered and why did it go missing in the first place? When exhibited at the Expo(s), I believe some alternate footage was included that was culled from Army archives. IIRC, that alternate footage wasn't originally shot in 3-D, but rather was assembled from multiple camera setups that, purely by happenstance, yielded stereoscopic footage when combined. Do I have that information correct?

  83. Hi James,
    I found the abandoned 35mm left/right elements on DOOM TOWN in a vault in 1984. They were going to be junked!
    The blast footage was originally in color and was on a separate negative roll that is lost. My suspicion is that it got pulled for stock footage shortly after the short was withdrawn from distribution in July 1953.
    Your memory is correct, the recreation was done from existing left/right footage found in the Army archive.
    Bob

  84. Bob, have you heard anything about progress being made by the 3D Film Preservation Fund on THE MASK (aka EYES OF HELL)? Last year, Jack Theakston said they were still taking inventory of the materials given to them by Medallion. Would be nice to see it cleaned up and new prints made for theatrical showings.

  85. Bob Furmanek

    When you read the contemporary reviews for 3-D films during that period, you'll see the dilemma faced by producers. If they piled on the gimmickry, the critics always complained. If they released a film that was beautifully photographed with superb composition for depth but no off-screen effects, the critics wandered where the gimmicks were and said the movie does not take advantage of the 3-D process. It was a no win situation!
    Bob

    I feel that these days, the same situation exists. Pile on gimmicks and you get lambasted for it (the Piranha remake), and use it in a subtle way, and people will wonder why it was shot in 3D at all (I believe Hugo gets this, and a few Pixar movies as well). You can't win, apparently.

  86. I can relate.

    My biggest gripe is that there isn't enough films made that
    really make it worth people paying the price to see it in 3D.

    Then again, there comes a film like HUGO that is less about
    effects thrown in your face in favor of depth that really brings
    out the beauty in the scenery.

  87. pinknik

    I just saw on DVDReview.com that Paramount is releasing HONDO, but . . . NO 3-D. Lame. Hopefully corrected somewhere down the line.

    That has been a long, lamented discussion here on HTF in the Hondo announcement thread.

  88. Ronald Epstein

    I can relate.
    My biggest gripe is that there isn't enough films made that
    really make it worth people paying the price to see it in 3D.
    Then again, there comes a film like HUGO that is less about
    effects thrown in your face in favor of depth that really brings
    out the beauty in the scenery.

    I thought the same thing about Coraline, a movie I ironically saw in 2D. I really felt that I missed something that would have been there in 3D. Kinda like watching a color movie on a black and white TV, or something.

  89. Originally Posted by Brian Borst /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/120#post_3906751
    I thought the same thing about Coraline, a movie I ironically saw in 2D. I really felt that I missed something that would have been there in 3D. Kinda like watching a color movie on a black and white TV, or something.

    Coraline is a really good example of another film that has greatly enhanced entertainment value when seen in 3D.

  90. Originally Posted by moviebear1 /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/120#post_3907354
    What I don't understand is why they are not putting out Hondo in 3D when they already have a digital 3D Master of it.

    That's baffled quite a few of us.

  91. moviebear1

    What I don't understand is why they are not putting out Hondo in 3D when they already have a digital 3D Master of it.

    Since it will have the same extras as the old DVD they don't have to do anything.

  92. HI
    I was wondering has anybody else have any information? A friend of mine just sent me an e-mail and he said he heard that Sony is in the process of remastering all the columbia 3D classics from the fifties for Blu Ray. The Mad Magician and Miss Sadie Thompson would be among the first released.
    Do you think this is just wishful thinking ?
    Dan

  93. All nine Columbia 3-D features have been preserved and mastered in HD for several years now. THE MAD MAGICIAN has been available as a download on the Sony Playstation system but I'm not aware of any Blu-ray plans at this time.
    Bob

  94. Originally Posted by MattH. /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/120#post_3906757
    Coraline is a really good example of another film that has greatly enhanced entertainment value when seen in 3D.

    CORALINE and INFERNO remain my two all time favorite 3-D films and 3-D experiences.

  95. Professor Echo

    CORALINE and INFERNO remain my two all time favorite 3-D films and 3-D experiences.

    INFERNO in 3D is fantastic, as is SECOND CHANCE. GORILLA AT LARGE is another one that needs to be seen in 3D to be fully appreciated.

  96. Steve Tannehill

    That has been a long, lamented discussion here on HTF in the Hondo announcement thread.

    Sorry for tuning in late, but has the Wayne estate chimed in on the issue, seeing as they own the rights?
    (And we hadn't really heard from them since the theatrical 3-D restoration.)
    We don't expect the Golden Age Rush to go wide until after Universal gets a lot of pop-cult press for bringing back Jaws 3-D next summer, and then it's pretty easy to guess the other studios will be jumping for the 80's titles for kitsch value.
    Just when and if we get some 50's "class" into Blu3D revival is going to decide the issue.

  97. No, the Wayne Estate has not said a word.
    We have a real chicken and egg situation with the Golden Age titles. I've had plenty of people tell me they will buy a 3-D Blu-ray set-up when some older titles are available, but the copyright holders are reluctant to proceed and spend money because the numbers are so low.
    I can tell you from the work I'm doing on our titles; mastering and re-aligning in HD for dual-strip 35mm 3-D material is not cheap!
    Bob

  98. Bob Furmanek

    …I can tell you from the work I'm doing on our titles; mastering and re-aligning in HD for dual-strip 35mm 3-D material is not cheap!
    Bob

    So, maybe when your titles are released and they sell well, the studios might do theirs too.

  99. I just came across an article on another site that said most 3-D movies of the 1950's were projected at 1.66.
    Not true.
    Here's the breakdown for the correct, director-intended aspect ratio for the 50 domestic 3-D features released from 1952-1955:
    1.33/1.37 – Twenty
    1.66 – Six
    1.75 – Four
    1.85 – Seventeen
    2.1 – Three
    Bob Furmanek
    3-D Film Archive, LLC

  100. Bob Furmanek

    I just came across an article on another site that said most 3-D movies of the 1950's were projected at 1.66.
    Not true.
    Here's the breakdown for the correct, director-intended aspect ratio for the 50 domestic 3-D features released from 1952-1955:
    1.33/1.37 – Twenty
    1.66 – Six
    1.75 – Four
    1.85 – Seventeen
    2.1 – Three
    Bob Furmanek
    3-D Film Archive, LLC

    Thanks for clearing that up. Although it's a pity the 3D process didn't have much overlap with the widescreen era.

  101. Starting in late March 1953, the studios began composing for various widescreen ratios while still shooting open matte (1.33) to protect for theaters not yet equipped.
    By August 1953, every studio (including Allied Artists and Republic) had gone widescreen and by the end of December 1953, 58% of all theaters in the U.S. had installed the new equipment.
    See post 47 in this thread for information on our upcoming article which will set the record straight: http://www.hometheaterforum.com/t/319469/aspect-ratio-research

  102. Ethan Riley

    Thanks for clearing that up. Although it's a pity the 3D process didn't have much overlap with the widescreen era.

    You're welcome, but I think 30 out of 50 domestic 3-D features composed for widescreen is a pretty good ratio!
    Bob

  103. Republic went 100% widescreen on August 18 1953 and announced their films would be composed for either 1.66 or 1.85. JOHNNY GUITAR began filming in mid-October. Variety lists 1.66 and Exhibitor lists 1.85.
    If I were mastering from the open matte element, I'd go with 1.66.
    Bob

  104. Coming Soon from the 3-D Film Archive. Be sure to watch in 1080P for best quality.

    PLEASE NOTE: None of these trailers are restored and the quality does not represent the new HD restoration from the camera negatives.
    Bob

  105. Bob Furmanek

    Coming Soon from the 3-D Film Archive. Be sure to watch in 1080P for best quality.
    The Bubble re-issue trailer

    AAHH!! Quit messing with my head!:
    Find some people of the right generation, and you will find a few 8-12-yo. moviegoers who stared in baffled and slightly disturbed puzzlement at the 1977 Bubble "Fantastic Invasion of Planet Earth" re-issue–in SPACE-VISION 3-D!–trailer just before the movie we had come to see, a little underground word-of-mouth hit called "Star Wars":
    "Wait…This's a gag, right? The theater's digging up kitschy old sci-fi trailers from the 50's to add to the whole Flash Gordon feeling, that's it, isn't it? 😕 "
    I can only ask you to imagine the audience's reaction. ("It wants my baby!") But I've been morbidly curious to track it down ever since I found out the real title.

  106. THE BUBBLE, while perhaps not the best of 3D movies, does have some decent 3D effects. The floating tray of beer is the best one. Hell, that effect even looked decent in the anaglyphic 3D DVD and VHS Rhino had out. For whatever reason, THE BUBBLE is the one 3D movie to have consistent 3D releases on home video. It was put out in Field Sequential under the title THE ZOO, there was the anaglyphic version from Rhino, and I believe it was Stereovision that put out their own VHS which utilized a flip-up/fold down polarized screen and polarized glasses back in the 1980s. So a 3D Blu Ray of it is not surprising. At least it's not DOMO ARIGATO, which has to be one of the worst movies–3D or otherwise–that I've suffered through. Had that been just a straight travelogue of Japan, it might have been an interesting movie. But the love story between two ugly people helped derail any interst the film might have had. That and the fact that absolutely nothing happened in the course of 90 minutes.
    Now, DRAGONFLY SQUADRON…that I'm really hyped for. I've never even seen it, it's from the 1950s, and it actually looks like it might be a decent movie. So when is the 3D Blu Ray of that coming? I want it the day it is released.
    BTW, the best of Oboler's 3 3D movies is BWANA DEVIL . At least that one's funny and has a decent cast. The scene where the lions just meander in to the train car with the Great White Hunters is hilarious. And Barbara Britton is hot, so that's always a plus.

  107. Many months ago you posted that a title would be released in 3-D that has never been seen in 3-D. I would never thought the title would be DRAGONFLY SQUADRON. I saw Fantastic Invasion of Planet Earth many years ago in 3-D. Very strange film.

  108. Todd J Moore

    …BTW, the best of Oboler's 3 3D movies is BWANA DEVIL (which doesn't say much, I must admit). Put that out, and that one I'll get. At least that one's funny and has a decent cast. The scene where the lions just meander in to the train car with the Great White Hunters is hilarious…

    …but not nearly as entertaining as the scene where Robert Stack is locked in a life-or-death struggle with an enormous stuffed lion.

  109. Film Forum in NYC will apparently be showing the Creature From The Black Lagoon in 3D in August or later. At the end of its current schedule, a Universal 100 Anniversary collection of films, which runs four weeks through August 9, it shows a picture of the creature and says coming soon in 3D. Hopefully this will be a 3D Festival and not just the one film

  110. For those that didn't see the text with the trailers, here's more info on our restorations:
    DRAGONFLY SQUADRON

    "The Korean War is raging. US Air Force Major Mathew Brady is ordered to speed up training of the South Korean troops. Driven almost beyond their endurance, the green fighter pilots check the Red Invasion of their country and attempt to drive the enemy back."
    * Starring John Hodiak, Barbara Britton and Chuck Connors. Directed by Lesley Selander.
    * While filmed in dual 35mm Polaroid 3-D in August 1953, interest in the process had greatly diminished and DRAGONFLY SQUADRON was released flat only in March 1954. For decades, historians and film buffs believed the original left and right elements were long gone and considered this film a "lost" 3-D title, never to be seen by anyone. Until now.
    * The 3-D Film Archive has found the lost elements and will present this Golden Age 3-D feature for the first time in the original stereoscopic 1.85:1 widescreen version. We are performing a complete 2K digital restoration utilizing the left/right camera negatives and master 35mm fine grains. This restored HD 3-D version is better than ever before as a result of shot by shot stereoscopic digital correction and alignment techniques.
    *PLEASE NOTE – This flat trailer has not been restored and does not represent the quality of the feature film HD restoration.
    " The 3-D Film Archive was formed in 1990 and is the first organization dedicated to the restoration and preservation of our stereoscopic film heritage.
    Please keep both eyes on this page for updates and more treasures from the Archive!
    THE BUBBLE
    Set in the classic 1960's vein of "The Twilight Zone" and "The Outer Limits", director Arch Oboler presents a sci-fi mystery of a lost plane in a freak storm which leaves its passengers in a mysterious town filled with bizarre inhabitants and strange ruins. Can they escape from this horrific alien experiment? Can they break free from … THE BUBBLE?
    * Starring Michael Cole, Deborah Walley & Johnny Desmond. First feature film shot in Space-Vision.
    * THE BUBBLE was written and directed by Arch Oboler, who was well known not only for his radio dramas in the 1940's, but also for kick starting the 1950s 3-D wave in the United States with his first 3-D feature film: "Bwana Devil". Always the innovator, Oboler's THE BUBBLE was the first major motion picture to use single strip 3-D for both filming and exhibition. This started a new wave of single strip polarized 3-D presentations that continued for more than 20 years.
    * The 3-D Film Archive is currently restoring this feature directly from the original 35mm camera negative, exceeding standard HD resolutions (2048×1707). Each shot is being meticulously adjusted and color corrected for the best image quality possible. Our perfectly aligned presentation of the original stereoscopic elements will provide an unsurpassed 3-D experience of this landmark feature film.
    *PLEASE NOTE: This original trailer from 1966 is not restored. The quality does not represent the new HD restoration from the camera negative.

  111. Garysb

    Film Forum in NYC will apparently be showing the Creature From The Black Lagoon in 3D in August or later. At the end of its current schedule, a Universal 100 Anniversary collection of films, which runs four weeks through August 9, it shows a picture of the creature and says coming soon in 3D. Hopefully this will be a 3D Festival and not just the one film

    It would be nice is this was a portent of a 3D release on blu.

  112. I was hoping that when I clicked on the poster that it would take me to an order link…:)
    Seriously, what are the distribution plans? Will these titles be available from retailers, e-tailers, directly from the 3-D Film Archive, some/all of the above?

  113. I wish!
    We're working on the HD restoration now and are negotiating with a few possible distributors. Just as soon as I can announce a definite release, I'll post it here. My goal is to get it released on Blu-ray this year.
    Bob

  114. While I freely admit that I most anxiously await titles like the CREATURES, IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE, HOUSE OF WAX, etc. I'll be thrilled to get these, especially DRAGONFLY SQUADRON!
    Great poster by the way. How wonderful to see this lost treasure in 3D.
    Just let us know when we can buy them.
    Oh, and any chance there might be a short or two on these releases? (please, please…)
    SAM33

  115. Thanks a lot Stewart, that's very kind of you. We will include one or two shorts with each feature, but we have other plans for that material.
    We own several hours of 3-D shorts, tests, trailers and cartoons dating back to 1922, including Kelly's Plasticon Pictures: THRU' THE TREES – WASHINGTON D.C., the earliest surviving 3-D demonstration film from 1922; Lumiere's "L'Arrivée d'un Train" first shown at the Academie des Sciences in Paris in March 1935; NEW DIMENSIONS (aka MOTOR RHYTHM) the first domestic full color 3-D film originally shown at the New York World's Fair in May 1940; BOO MOON, an excellent example of color stereoscopic animation from December 1953; DOOM TOWN, a controversial anti-atomic testing film which was mysteriously pulled from theatrical release after a few play-dates in July of 1953; THE MAZE coming attraction trailer with fantastic 3-D production design by the legendary William Cameron Menzies, and many more.
    These rare and historic shorts will be compiled into several volumes of "Treasures from the 3-D Film Archive."
    Bob

  116. I have to admit, that poster for DRAGONFLY SQUADRON is gorgeous. Absolutely gorgeous. As hyped as I am for the 3D Blu release of DIAL M FOR MURDER and JAWS 3-D, I am perhaps even more hyped for DRAGONFLY SQUADRON. I've viewed the trailer several times already and I think it looks pretty darn good. If it's half as good as CEASE FIRE, it'll be great. And check that cast! A couple of serial veterans in it: Herman Brix and Gerald Mohr! May you make a huge profit on this and THE BUBBLE.
    Actually, among the fifties films, I really only have an aversion to THE NEBRASKAN, and yet I have it in my collection. So yes, even if it's a classic 3D I don't care for, I'll buy it.
    BTW, Bob, will Dragonfly Squadron be shown with or without an intermission card? I also like when the Intermission card is included. I think it's a neat touch.

  117. Thanks Todd, the 3-D on DRAGONFLY is excellent and after our shot by shot correction and alignment, it's downright flawless. It was only released flat because of the diminished interest in 3-D product in early 1954.
    3-D's first decline happened in September/October of 1953. That's when studios were pressured by exhibitors to make the films available flat day and date with the 3-D version. (Prior to that change, the 3-D would be exclusive for several months and then the flat version was released to theaters.)
    November/December saw the release of several high quality, big budget titles that did exceptional business in 3-D, including KISS ME KATE, HONDO and MISS SADIE THOMPSON. During this brief resurgence, Allied Artists announced they would test the 3-D version of DRAGONFLY SQUADRON in four cities (just as MGM had done with KATE) to gauge audience interest.
    [​IMG]
    However, after pouring through the industry trades on a daily basis, I can find no documentation that the four test engagements ever took place. I believe that DRAGONFLY was never seen in 3-D, except by the producers and executives at Allied Artists. I don't believe a 3-D intermission card was ever prepared for this film.
    Bob

  118. I'm not sure of the current status of elements. I did preserve one 35mm left/right print which now sits in an Archive. The rights are currently owned by Paramount.
    About 30 years ago, the owner nearly junked one side of the master 35mm fine grain believing it was a duplicate. Thanks to Bud Abbott Jr (optical technician at the lab) it was saved. He came to work one morning and found the box with the nine 1K cans sitting on the loading dock ready for the dumpster. His boss told him it was a duplicate and was ordered for destruction!

  119. The eight I need to see in 3D are:
    Arena
    The Bounty Hunter
    The Command
    Louisiana Territory
    The Moonlighter
    Son of Sinbad
    Southwest Passage
    Top Banana
    I know Top Banana only exists in 2D and from what I've heard, only about half of Southwest Passage exists in 3D. Of the films on the list, I've seen Arena, The Moonlighter, and Son of Sinbad in 2D on video/TV. I keep missing Top Banana when TCM shows it. I sat down to watch Southwest Passage back in the 1990s on TNT, but my cable was acting up so I didn't get to see it. I have not yet bought The Command on MOD from Warner Archive. As for The Bounty Hunter and Louisiana Territory, I've never had the ability to see either one.
    As far as films of the 1950s goes, I've managed to see 37 of them in the movies and an additional 3 in Field Sequential on DVD plus (as mentioned) Hondo in anaglyphic format. The ones I've missed in the theaters have been Arena, Cat Women of the Moon, Dangerous Mission, Hondo, and Hannah Lee. The oft-discussed Expo 3 where all 50 films were to be shown that doesn't seem like it will ever happen is something that I rue. Of course, missing Expo I is also something I rue.

  120. Expo 1 and Expo 2 are the two most significant experiences in my moviegoing life. I saw all the films.
    I walked out on Flesh for Frankenstein. I saw it a couple of times on its initial release in NYC but I can't stand it now. The mindset of the whole thing disgusts me.
    Seeing the celebrities didn't interest me much; I went for the films, and to see what I could learn about stereoscopic cinematography by watching.
    I wish the cameramen and directors had still been alive and able to attend, so they could talk in a disciplined way about how 3-D is shot.
    Richard Fleischer was the only director in attendance, but he wasn't asked to talk tech.

  121. Todd J Moore

    At Expo 2, I only missed two films, both of them midnight movies: NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD 3D and FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN. I'm not convinced I missed much.

    I saw FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN – (the title was Andy Warhol's Frankenstein when I saw it and rated X) when it was released in 1974 and it was a very graphic horror film for that time. I also have it in field-sequential but you need a CRT TV to see it. The 3-D was done well with a lot of out-of-the-screen effect scenes.

  122. Richard: Herbert L. Strock attended the sold-out screening of GOG in 2003. As I recall, he talked quite a bit about shooting and composing for 3-D. Like Andre deToth, he also had monocular vision.
    Todd, from your list:
    Arena – dual strip 3-D print survives, last shown in 2003.
    The Bounty Hunter – left/right elements survive.
    The Command – negatives never edited for 3-D.
    Louisiana Territory – 3-D segments survive, condition of elements unknown.
    The Moonlighter – left/right elements survive.
    Son of Sinbad – 3-D segments and tests survive, condition of elements unknown.
    Southwest Passage – 5 of 9 reels survive in 3-D.
    Top Banana – only the right side survives.
    Quite honestly, I'm amazed at how many people feel the 3-D is well done on FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN. The compositions are good but many of the shots (especially close-ups) are VERY hard on the eyes. If and when this film is mastered for HD and Blu-ray, it would definitely need a shot by shot alignment to make it watchable.
    Bob

  123. Bob Furmanek

    Richard: Herbert L. Strock attended the sold-out screening of GOG in 2003. As I recall, he talked quite a bit about shooting and composing for 3-D. Like Andre deToth, he also had monocular vision.

    Oh yes, that's right. I forgot about Strock.
    I wish I could replay what he said somehow.
    I know you guys videotaped everything.
    I have his westerns (non 3-D) which I like very much.

  124. Bob Furmanek

    …Quite honestly, I'm amazed at how many people feel the 3-D is well done on FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN. The compositions are good but many of the shots (especially close-ups) are VERY hard on the eyes. If and when this film is mastered for HD and Blu-ray, it would definitely need a shot by shot alignment to make it watchable.
    Bob

    It's been a long time since I have seen the movie. I just remember the out-of-screen effects looking pretty impressive. Maybe the rest of the movie was hard on the eyes.

  125. Bob Furmanek

    Quite honestly, I'm amazed at how many people feel the 3-D is well done on FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN. The compositions are good but many of the shots (especially close-ups) are VERY hard on the eyes. If and when this film is mastered for HD and Blu-ray, it would definitely need a shot by shot alignment to make it watchable.
    Bob

    I think a lot of people just have fond memories of the 70s and 80s films just because they were gimmicky. Also, if people are watching them on Field Sequential, I know that helps make them a little less rough on the eyes. I have a FS of RUN FOR COVER and can tell you it's not as hard on the eyes as the theatrical print.
    I only ever saw Warhol's Frankenstein in 2D on USA Up All Night years ago and didn't care for it much as a movie. I've not been too keen on re-experiencing it, either.

  126. Pardon my naivete, I'm trying to learn more, so hopefully this won't be too dumb a question: For the films which only have one side or 3-D fragments remaining, does technology or will technology exist for one to use the remaining footage and create a full 3-D master?

  127. Glen, it is possible to recreate a pseudo stereo image from one side of a lost 3-D film. However, the cost would be astronomical and it would not look nearly as good as something that was actually photographed in 3-D.
    Bob

  128. Bob Furmanek

    BOO MOON, an excellent example of color stereoscopic animation from December 1953;

    Came across Boo Moon in a collection of Casper cartoons, and even in 2-D, thought it looked a little Fleischer/Famous/Paramount 3D-ish…
    (With the star scenes, and Casper floating toward the camera, etc.)
    Felty already hints that the Popeye "Ace of Space" may show up on one of the Warners, since Warner owns the character, but were those the only two Paramount/Famous 3D's in the 50's?
    (And is it possible to put teasing promotional clips up on YouTube3D, to keep us abreast of your latest projects? 😀
    For those of us with YouTube smart-TV's that can convert SBS…)

  129. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/150#post_3920079
    Glen, it is possible to recreate a pseudo stereo image from one side of a lost 3-D film. However, the cost would be astronomical and it would not look nearly as good as something that was actually photographed in 3-D.
    Bob

    Thank you for the information, Bob. At some point maybe they will be able to do it in an economical and more perfected way, but at that point will anyone still be interested in seeing vintage 3-D? I hope so.

    Off topic, but quickly: As per the bio of you in the first post of this thread and your association with Jerry Lewis, do you think we will ever see a release of THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED?

  130. Yes Eric, BOO MOON and POPEYE, THE ACE OF SPACE were the only two 3-D cartoons produced by Paramount. They were intended and designed for 1.66 presentation.
    When the time is right, we'll be putting some 3-D clips on You Tube. I'll be sure to post here when that happens.
    You're welcome, Glen. I doubt THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED will ever see the light of day. The film was never finished and all that survives is a rough cut. Contrary to what's been written, people have never seen the completed film, only segments. Jerry showed some footage to students at USC while he was teaching a course in film-making. Despite his claims, Harry Shearer has never seen it.
    Also, the script circulating is an early draft and does not accurately represent what was put onto film.

  131. Thanks again, Bob. I appreciate your response and the update about THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED. I don't want to stray too far off topic, so I'll leave it at that, but being a big fan of Lewis, I would sure like to see it someday, even in its truncated form.

    I do have one more question: Were you involved in the 3-D fest that was held at the Vagabond Theater in Los Angeles in the late 80's? That's where I first saw a number of the classic 3-D titles and opening night was great with HOUSE OF WAX and personal appearances by Vincent Price and Andre De Toth.

  132. I helped Chris Condon track down some prints for that festival, but that was my only involvement. Chris had the idea of showing nothing but 3-D at the Vagabond but it didn't last very long. There were issues with the equipment and I saw quite a few shows plagued with sync and phase issues.
    When they ran the only existing dual-strip print of CAT WOMEN OF THE MOON (with Marie Windsor in the audience) the film broke at two different points and had to be shut down. It was a mess.
    My first professional 3-D gig was at the 8th Street Playhouse in New York in April of 1980. Good lord, that was 32 years ago this month! I'm getting old…
    Bob

  133. If I recall I only saw HOUSE OF WAX, INFERNO and KISS ME KATE at that fest and thankfully there weren't any problems with those screenings. Although WAX started late on opening night and for whatever reason Andre De Toth walked up to me waiting in line outside, shook my hand and personally apologized for the delay. I have no idea why he singled ME out. ??? They ran SPOOKS! before the feature and I think it spoiled everyone with that memorable image of the needle, for me the single greatest 3-D shot ever (no pun intended).

    I enjoyed the Vagabond when it was a revival house and saw some great stuff there. Sad that it's gone along with all the rest of them, save for the glorious New Beverly.

  134. Todd J Moore

    I think a lot of people just have fond memories of the 70s and 80s films just because they were gimmicky. Also, if people are watching them on Field Sequential, I know that helps make them a little less rough on the eyes. I have a FS of RUN FOR COVER and can tell you it's not as hard on the eyes as the theatrical print.
    I only ever saw Warhol's Frankenstein in 2D on USA Up All Night years ago and didn't care for it much as a movie. I've not been too keen on re-experiencing it, either.

    Was it fullscreen or letterbox? I remember when they released Warhol's Frankenstein on video flat. I thought who would want to see this movie not in 3-D? It's the 3-D that makes the movie fun to see.

  135. RolandL

    Was it fullscreen or letterbox? I remember when they released Warhol's Frankenstein on video flat. I thought who would want to see this movie not in 3-D? It's the 3-D that makes the movie fun to see.

    It was full screen.
    Back in the 1980s, the only way I could see most 3D movies was in their 2D format. I saw a large number of the 50s films flat long before I got to see them in 3D. Ditto the 80s films. I was between the ages of 10-12 when the 80s boom happened and only got taken to see JAWS 3-D at the time. So what of the rest I was allowed to see (only the PG ones), I got to see in 2D on home video unless they were shown on broadcast TV (THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE). Back then, I wanted to see every movie ever made in 3D, even knowing that I'd only see them in 2D. After JAWS 3-D, I didn't get to see a projected 3-D movie until a convention in 1989 ran REVENGE OF THE CREATURE in anaglyphic 16mm. I got excited whenever the 3-D Video Coporation films got shown on broadcast TV. Point in fact, I only got a field sequential system about 10 years ago and I only got it then because I found out there were 9 50s films generally available through Ebay. Had that not been the case, I wouldn't have bought an FS system since most of what was avaialble at the time was porn, something I'm not particularly interested in. I've seen 2 3-D porns over the years–M 3-D! THE MOVIE and THE STEWARDESSES–and I can spend the rest of my life never seeing another one and die a very happy man thank you very much. M 3-D! THE MOVIE–which I got to see at the Roxy Screening Rooms in Philly in 1991 (I was only 20 at the time)– is the movie that convinced me that I did not need to see every 3-D movie ever and not long after that I became more interested in only bothering with the 50s batch.
    I've been aware of the FS version of WARHOL'S FRANKENSTEIN and had little interest in actually getting it. Ditto for PARASITE, FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 3 and several others. Some of the newer films are pretty good, but I mostly have the ones that I really liked. I'll get UP and might get AVATAR if it ever becomes available, but my interest is primarily in classic 3D. I can't say that I'd get WARHOL'S FRANKENSTEIN if it became available in 3D Blu Ray. But any 50s movie–even a complete turkey like THE NEBRASKAN–will get a sale from me if it comes out.
    What the point of this entire post was, I forget.

  136. Todd J Moore

    It was full screen.
    Back in the 1980s, the only way I could see most 3D movies was in their 2D format. I saw a large number of the 50s films flat long before I got to see them in 3D. Ditto the 80s films. I was between the ages of 10-12 when the 80s boom happened and only got taken to see JAWS 3-D at the time. So what of the rest I was allowed to see (only the PG ones), I got to see in 2D on home video unless they were shown on broadcast TV (THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE). Back then, I wanted to see every movie ever made in 3D, even knowing that I'd only see them in 2D. After JAWS 3-D, I didn't get to see a projected 3-D movie until a convention in 1989 ran REVENGE OF THE CREATURE in anaglyphic 16mm. I got excited whenever the 3-D Video Coporation films got shown on broadcast TV. Point in fact, I only got a field sequential system about 10 years ago and I only got it then because I found out there were 9 50s films generally available through Ebay. Had that not been the case, I wouldn't have bought an FS system since most of what was avaialble at the time was porn, something I'm not particularly interested in. I've seen 2 3-D porns over the years–M 3-D! THE MOVIE and THE STEWARDESSES–and I can spend the rest of my life never seeing another one and die a very happy man thank you very much. M 3-D! THE MOVIE–which I got to see at the Roxy Screening Rooms in Philly in 1991 (I was only 20 at the time)– is the movie that convinced me that I did not need to see every 3-D movie ever and not long after that I became more interested in only bothering with the 50s batch.
    I've been aware of the FS version of WARHOL'S FRANKENSTEIN and had little interest in actually getting it. Ditto for PARASITE, FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 3 and several others. Some of the newer films are pretty good, but I mostly have the ones that I really liked. I'll get UP and might get AVATAR if it ever becomes available, but my interest is primarily in classic 3D. I can't say that I'd get WARHOL'S FRANKENSTEIN if it became available in 3D Blu Ray. But any 50s movie–even a complete turkey like THE NEBRASKAN–will get a sale from me if it comes out.
    What the point of this entire post was, I forget.

    Full screen? I wouldn't watch the film if it was flat and 2.35:1, only is 3-D!
    You were 20 in 1991? You are young. I was 40.
    I started buying FS tapes back in the 1980's. They were so expensive, $75 to $100 each, but the only way to see true 3-D at home. Yes you had flickering but, the color was so much better than anaglyph.

  137. I am attempting to convert my FS DVDs to Over/Under so I can watch them on my TV. An early test on one worked nicely, but I've had rotten luck sincw.. Anyone who knows a foolproof way to do this and wants to post it here, I'd be much appreciative .

  138. Careful, please.

    There's a smell of bootleg here, and our rules explicitly forbid discussing bootlegs.
    All members accepted those rules, so don't be surprised if measures are taken when such discussions would proceed.
    The same applies to discussing what are in fact illegal copies (whether you like that judgment or not).

    Thanks for understanding.

    Cees

  139. Don't know if the mod's post was directed towards me, Roland or both, but I edited my post all the same. Any conversion to Over/Under would simply be for my own pleasure (I don't sell copies of anything I own unless it's a movie I myself made). Thank you and I apologize if I said the wrong thing here.

  140. RolandL

    Dynasty (aka Warlord)

    I remember when our local station showed a sweeps-week showing of "Dynasty" with comedy movie-hosts, back during the brief craze for TV-anaglyph (and never could find a 7-Eleven with those promotional glasses)–
    And all night long, there was the running joke of, "Does it have…?" "…No, it does not have Joan Collins in it!!!" 😛
    (Still, does emphasize just how much between the 50's Golden Age and 80's Silver Age there is left to convert.
    Knew about A*P*E, but Emmanuelle 4 was a new one.)

  141. My take on Paul Morrissey/Andy Warhol's FRANKENSTEIN from a 3-D standpoint is it can be very hit and miss, very likely due to the hurried shooting schedule. Some shots are excellent as-is, while many others could *really* benefit from re-alignment.
    On a sidenote, this almost 40 year old title is certainly NOT for family watching, as some aspects of twisted debauchery in this feature make many of the Friday the 13th and Halloween titles mild by comparison. 😮 – 😎 – 😮

  142. GregK

    My take on Paul Morrissey/Andy Warhol's FRANKENSTEIN from a 3-D standpoint is it can be very hit and miss, very likely due to the hurried shooting schedule. Some shots are excellent as-is, while many others could *really* benefit from re-alignment.
    On a sidenote, this almost 40 year old title is certainly NOT for family watching, as some aspects of twisted debauchery in this feature make many of the Friday the 13th and Halloween titles mild by comparison. 😮 – 😎 – 😮

    That's why it was rated X.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I thought this scene with the girl coming out of the screen into the auditorium was pretty cool.

  143. Bob Furmanek

    I helped Chris Condon track down some prints for that festival, but that was my only involvement. Chris had the idea of showing nothing but 3-D at the Vagabond but it didn't last very long. There were issues with the equipment and I saw quite a few shows plagued with sync and phase issues.
    When they ran the only existing dual-strip print of CAT WOMEN OF THE MOON (with Marie Windsor in the audience) the film broke at two different points and had to be shut down. It was a mess.
    My first professional 3-D gig was at the 8th Street Playhouse in New York in April of 1980. Good lord, that was 32 years ago this month! I'm getting old…
    Bob

    StereoVision was a rickety and unreliable process, wouldn't you say?
    Condon drove me nuts in a production deal we had going.

  144. RolandL

    That's why it was rated X. .

    Yes, it was rated X, but many x-rated titles of that time period were either self imposed or could now qualify for an R rating. Hence my note, which will be a deterrent to some, but will also spark interest for others. 😉

  145. X was not a badge of shame that it came to later possess. X simply meant no one under 17 admitted. The Oscar-winning Midnight Cowboy was originally rated X (later re-rated R). So was A CLockwork Orange.

  146. The resurgence of stereoscopic cinema in the early 1970s was quickly buried by X-rated 3-D porn films. They are barely competent, ineptly made, sleazy in the worst way, and they turn the stereoscopic language into the cheapest, most unimaginative gimmick. Moreover, they brought 3-D into disrepute for a long, long time. Not even the resurgence in the 1980s could overcome the disrepute. I know these films circulate among private collectors, but I hope they stay buried as commercial properties. They have absolutely nothing to offer. They will not help stereoscopic films take root today, in fact, they may impair the progress.
    Forget about them.
    Let's move on.

  147. View-Master…I remember View-Master, before it descended into just Dreamworks movies, IMAX 3-D, and Discovery Channel dinosaurs.
    Probably had the most impact on my becoming an early-adopter warrior for 3D Blu. 😀
    (And while I can't speak for FFF or The Stewardesses–and only a little bit for the Silver Age 80's renaissance–I'm more in the position that while I probably wouldn't actually watch Frankenstein more than once, I would fight to defend its right to come out on 3D Blu as originally intended, for cult value.
    I know the 70's porn may not quite be in the same league as "This Ain't Avatar XXX 3D", but my film-preservation instincts object to seeing any film age "buried" because someone didn't like it.)

  148. I still have a viewmaster set (although the springs make a squeaky sound when you operate it), actually two operational viewmasters, but I have even more: a whole box of these type of stereo-cards (some transparent, some not):

    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately the beautiful wooden stereoscope that went with it is broken beyond repair, but I have plans to restore it, or even have it rebuilt if necessary.
    (The main problem is those big lenses.)

    Cees

  149. Oh man, I love View-Master. Being a '50s kid, that was a regular thing in our family. Our sets are unfortunately long gone, but I've acquired some reels in recent years. Mostly travel stuff — nothing in the way of movie tie-ins, or at least nothing really hot — but I still love 'em. I keep meaning to pick up a stereoscope or whatever the card viewer is called, because you can always find cards at flea markets and such, and those can be nice, too. Naturally, the most desirable samples of any of these things are highly collectible and pricey. But there's plenty to enjoy that's affordable.

  150. There were 29 Preview Reels made for 3-D features from 1953/54, and two promotional reels for The Robe and Beneath the Twelve-Mile Reef. Those are incredibly rare.
    The 3-D movie reels come up for sale from time to time. Probably the rarest is SON OF SINBAD. The reel was prepared in November 1953 but the film sat on the shelf until it's Superscope release in June, 1955.

  151. Ejanss

    View-Master…I remember View-Master, before it descended into just Dreamworks movies, IMAX 3-D, and Discovery Channel dinosaurs.
    Probably had the most impact on my becoming an early-adopter warrior for 3D Blu. 😀
    (And while I can't speak for FFF or The Stewardesses–and only a little bit for the Silver Age 80's renaissance–I'm more in the position that while I probably wouldn't actually watch Frankenstein more than once, I would fight to defend its right to come out on 3D Blu as originally intended, for cult value.
    I know the 70's porn may not quite be in the same league as "This Ain't Avatar XXX 3D", but my film-preservation instincts object to seeing any film age "buried" because someone didn't like it.)

    Oh, certainly. I have little doubt that FFF would be a big seller in 3D Blu Ray and that it's quite a cult movie. But me, I've grown pickier as I get older as to what I want to watch. From the Silver Age, I'd get Jaws 3D, Amityville 3D, and maybe Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone. If the promised 3D Blu of Comin' At Ya! comes out, I may get that, too.
    As for the porns…well, I said it before and I'll say it again: I can spend the rest of my life not seeing another 3D porn and die a happy man.

  152. Todd J Moore

    From the Silver Age, I'd get Jaws 3D, Amityville 3D, and maybe Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone. If the promised 3D Blu of Comin' At Ya! comes out, I may get that, too.

    (Ew….Sure you're not confusing Spacehunter with Starchaser: the Legend of Orin? Most do.)

  153. Ejanss

    (Ew….Sure you're not confusing Spacehunter with Starchaser: the Legend of Orin? Most do.)

    No, I'm not. Starchaser is the animated Star Wars ripoff. Spacehunter is the stupid but kinda fun movie with Peter Strauss, Molly Ringwald, Michael Ironside, and Ernie Hudson. Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared Syn is the one with Travolta's wife. Of the 3, I like Spacehunter best.

  154. Todd J Moore

    Oh, certainly. I have little doubt that FFF would be a big seller in 3D Blu Ray and that it's quite a cult movie. But me, I've grown pickier as I get older as to what I want to watch. From the Silver Age, I'd get Jaws 3D, Amityville 3D, and maybe Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone. If the promised 3D Blu of Comin' At Ya! comes out, I may get that, too.
    As for the porns…well, I said it before and I'll say it again: I can spend the rest of my life not seeing another 3D porn and die a happy man.

    I remember seeing Comin' At Ya! when it was released. Wasn't that the first title of the 1980's 3-D boom? I remember a lot of slow motion and tons of stuff coming out of the screen. But I seem to remember it had a lot of crosstalk.

  155. Originally Posted by RolandL /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/210#post_3922001
    I remember seeing Comin' At Ya! when it was released. Wasn't that the first title of the 1980's 3-D boom? I remember a lot of slow motion and tons of stuff coming out of the screen. But I seem to remember it had a lot of crosstalk.

    The whip and rattlesnake is what I remember about this film. It surprised everyone with what business it did and I would agree that it started the 80's 3D boon. Working in the film booking for exhibition at the time, it was a fun era and the films were a lot of fun. Friday The 13th 3D was a real audience thriller. But it ended as quickly as it begun with The Man Who Wasn't There as one of, if not the last of that era. The end was again poor films and poor execution on the exhibition side. Even though the studios did everything they could to make it work, the projectionists lacked a lot of knowledge.

    Some mentioned the 70's adult 3D films, I can certainly remember going to see The Stewardesses 3D a few time in the early years of college. Not sure if the 3D made an impression on me or it was something else.

  156. As I recall (and the experts here can correct me) AMITYVIILLE 3D, released in November 83, was the last 3D feature of the 82-83 wave (SPACEHUNTER, METALSTORM, THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE and JAWS 3D bowed Summer 83). I don't think there was another 3D feature until SPY KIDS 3D twenty years later.
    My first 3D film was the 82 reissue of HOUSE OF WAX. Unforgettable. And the FRIDAY THE 13th film, TREASURE OF THE FOUR CROWNS, and JAWS 3D (terrible) were the ones I saw first-run in that exciting if fast-moving wave.

  157. I've never seen Phantom of the Rue Morgue in 3D, and come to think of it, I don't see it turn up often on TCM in 2D. Do they show it, or have I just been unlucky enough to miss their broadcasts of it? I don't think I've seen it on TV in at least 20 years.

  158. Originally Posted by Bob Cashill /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/210#post_3922138
    PHANTOM was on TCM a month or two ago. RIP Medina, who was good fun with Joseph Cotten (her husband) in the Toho flick LATITUDE ZERO (69).

    Thanks. I'll have to keep a sharper eye out for it. I would like to see it again, even in 2D.

  159. Bob Cashill

    As I recall (and the experts here can correct me) AMITYVIILLE 3D, released in November 83, was the last 3D feature of the 82-83 wave (SPACEHUNTER, METALSTORM, THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE and JAWS 3D bowed Summer 83). I don't think there was another 3D feature until SPY KIDS 3D twenty years later.
    My first 3D film was the 82 reissue of HOUSE OF WAX. Unforgettable. And the FRIDAY THE 13th film, TREASURE OF THE FOUR CROWNS, and JAWS 3D (terrible) were the ones I saw first-run in that exciting if fast-moving wave.

    Feauture 3-D films released is the US between 1984 and 2002:
    1984
    Tales of the Third Dimension
    Hot Heir
    Venus
    Silent Madness
    Emmanuelle 4
    1985
    Starchaser: The Legend of Orin
    1990
    Blonde Emmanuelle
    1991
    Freddy's Dead – partial anaglyphic
    1996
    Run for Cover

  160. Originally Posted by Bob Cashill /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/210#post_3922125
    As I recall (and the experts here can correct me) AMITYVIILLE 3D, released in November 83, was the last 3D feature of the 82-83 wave (SPACEHUNTER, METALSTORM, THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE and JAWS 3D bowed Summer 83). I don't think there was another 3D feature until SPY KIDS 3D twenty years later.
    My first 3D film was the 82 reissue of HOUSE OF WAX. Unforgettable. And the FRIDAY THE 13th film, TREASURE OF THE FOUR CROWNS, and JAWS 3D (terrible) were the ones I saw first-run in that exciting if fast-moving wave.

    I agree with you, but THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE did such poor business and I mean down the drain business (There went the Steve Guttenberg saying that he was the luckiest man in movies) that not another major title was green lighted for 3D.

    Bob, you would be the one to know, but were any films after AMITYVILLE 3D that was planed for 3D, but did see a release in that format?

    The major high point for me also during that brief run was the HOUSE OF WAX reissue. That was the first time seeing in in 3D.

  161. Actually, I think it was a one-two-three punch of Spacehunter, Metalstorm, and The Man Who Wasn't There that helped kill 3D in the 1980s. Jaws 3D actually did pretty well. In fact, I believe it was Jaws 3D that displaced The Stewardesses as the highest grossing 3D movie of all time until it was displaced by Spy Kids 3-D. Also, Starchaser: The Legend of Orin was released in fall, 1985. It was the last 3D film to get a decent release until Freddy's Dead in 1991. It seems to me that Earl Owensby had a few more 3D films in 1984. I would need to check this, but wasn't Chain Gang, Hit the Road Running, and Hyperspace also in 1984?
    Oh, and if I am not mistaken, Blonde Emmanuelle is a recut version of Disco Dolls in Hot Skin and was released earlier than 1990. It's listed in R.M. Hayes book, which was published 1989. I know, I know. Hayes made a huge number of errors in that book and half the reviews are worthless as they mostly begin "I didn't like this when I was a kid…". However, even he couldn't put a title in his book for a movie that hadn't been released yet. Stephen Gibson likewise recut Lollipop Girls in Hard Candy as M 3-D! The Movie in 1984. I met Stephen Gibson. He's a nice guy and a real 3D enthusiast. I just wish he had chosen to make non-porn 3D movies instead of what he made. If the story is true (and I admit I didn't ask him), he did try with Black Lolita, but it bombed so he recut it with sex inserts and re-issued it as Wildcat Women.
    Funny story about Silent Madness. I read an interview with star Belinda Montgomery that was in the papers at the time of the film's release and she openly stated that she wished she hadn't made it. I know Bob kinda likes it. I think it's stupid but kinda fun. The orderly getting the drill in the head cracks me up everytime I see it.
    Oh, and Roland, yes, Comin' At Ya! was the first one in the 80s. I used to have the anaglyphic video from Rhino. I waited 18 years to see that damn film and when it was over, was left wondering why I watched it. Especially bizarre is the five minute sequence at the movie's end where they repeat all the 3D effects.
    I remember really liking Metalstorm when I was a kid. I saw it again a couple of years ago and was surprised to note how little actually happens in the film. Spacehunter, on the other hand, stood up a little better.
    BTW, Mid-Atlantic Nostalgia Convention is apparently showing Phantom of the Rue Morgue this August. What their source is, I do not know.

  162. Todd J Moore

    Actually, I think it was a one-two-three punch of Spacehunter, Metalstorm, and The Man Who Wasn't There that helped kill 3D in the 1980s. Jaws 3D actually did pretty well. In fact, I believe it was Jaws 3D that displaced The Stewardesses as the highest grossing 3D movie of all time until it was displaced by Spy Kids 3-D. Also, Starchaser: The Legend of Orin was released in fall, 1985. It was the last 3D film to get a decent release until Freddy's Dead in 1991.

    Oh, there's no question that "Part 3 in 3D!" (which became a running pop joke) killed off 80's 3D–
    I also remember that none of the processes were particularly good, except for Optimax which was used in F13th, and later in Man Who Wasn't There–The first one I couldn't see back then, the other I didn't have time to see before it zoomed through theaters. 🙁
    I remember the sense of "how cheap ARE these movies??" Even if Jaws 2 and Amityville II: the Possession aspired to a little bit of A-movie status, their respective 3's had nothing to do with the canons and looked they'd handed the production to a couple of first-timers with a camera. (For me, it was summed up when Siskel & Ebert reviewed Amityville 3-D and shouted "That is the crummiest monster I have ever seen in movies!" That pretty much encapsulated my sense of "Did the producers even SEE the first movie?", not to mention the Charles Band cheapos of Metalstorm and Parasite.)
    But think the reason there was the big space between Starchaser and Spy Kids 3 was the rise of the cineplex during the late 80's: Polarized 3-D had to stay on the same specially converted screen with the same projection equipment for a week at a time, which didn't make it feasible for cineplexes juggling their showings all day. Anaglyph you could show anywhere, until the rise of digital projection with Polar Express and Chicken Little. (Except for the IMAX 3D movies, which did stay in one place for weeks at a time.)

    I remember really liking Metalstorm when I was a kid. I saw it again a couple of years ago and was surprised to note how little actually happens in the film.

    Long POV sequences of driving through desert canyons! A cyborg points his acid gun at the camera, and then…MORE long POV sequences of driving through desert canyons!

  163. I remember the ads for "Amityville 3D" saying "This movie is not a sequel to The Amityville Horror or Amityville II: The Possession." Have only seen it in 2-D, crappy movie but would still buy a 3D Blu-Ray.

  164. The 3-D release calendar for the remainder of 2012 is looking mighty sorry (unless one is a big fan of Bikini Babes…) The US release of Up seems to have vanished, and Jaws 3-D is the sole bright spot. (How sad is that?)
    Please Bob…save us from the 3-D Wasteland with some Golden Age 3-D announcements. 🙂

  165. JamesNelson

    The 3-D release calendar for the remainder of 2012 is looking mighty sorry (unless one is a big fan of Bikini Babes…) The US release of Up seems to have vanished, and Jaws 3-D is the sole bright spot. (How sad is that?)

    And even that hasn't officially been studio-announced yet (with the "complete sequel box"), has it?

  166. Bob Furmanek

    We're in negotiations now.
    As soon as I can say something, you'll be sure to know!
    Thanks for the encouragement.
    Bob

    Money burns a hole in my pocket for golden age 3-D, Bob.
    I'm eager to buy anything you guys put out.
    The quality of your work — whether it be research and documentation in written histories or in theatrical presentations — is impeccable.
    And I know your Blu-rays will be, too.

  167. Originally Posted by Richard–W /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/210#post_3923773
    Money burns a hole in my pocket for golden age 3-D, Bob.
    I'm eager to buy anything you guys put out.
    The quality of your work — whether it be research and documentation in written histories or in theatrical presentations — is impeccable.
    And I know your Blu-rays will be, too.

    Many of us feel this way. We are really hungry to see these historical films in the worst way and can't wait for any and all announcements.

  168. Thanks Richard and Matt, I certainly understand your frustration. I truly appreciate your kind words.
    One of the deals we are negotiating involves a package with other Golden Age titles. Fingers crossed that it goes through.
    Everybody likes anniversaries and next year is the big 60th for 3-D's breakthrough year.
    I'll be sure to post any updates just as soon as I can.
    Bob

  169. I have already liked the page.
    And allow my humble voice to be a third vote of excitement for anything the 3D Film Archive releases. After all, I got a 3D TV simply because DIAL M FOR MURDER was announced for 3D Blu Ray. So, of course I'll buy classic 3D Blu Rays from the Archive!

  170. There have been rumors about both Dial M and House of Wax . . but I don't think there has been any offical announcement of these two titles. or am I wrong Bob?
    What I really want is KISS ME KATE. . . I never liked this movie when I saw it flat but now I can't imagine it any other way then 3D with Stereophonic Sound.

  171. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/240#post_3929299
    Here's a link to our new website, including articles on the History of the Archive, the Top Ten 3-D Myths, Restoration projects, the 3-D Holy Grail, Lost 3-D and more.
    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home
    I hope you find it interesting!
    Bob

    I went there this morning and had a delightful time reading a couple of pieces. Looks like a site I'll enjoy visiting over the long haul. Congratulations, you guys!

  172. Bob Furmanek

    Here's a link to our new website, including articles on the History of the Archive, the Top Ten 3-D Myths, Restoration projects, the 3-D Holy Grail, Lost 3-D and more.
    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home
    Bob

    I remember when it was just a site about the theatrical Hondo restoration, and….that was it. 😕
    Let's hope there's lots more restoration news to report, for film and disk!

  173. Thank you Charles, Matt and Eric. I'm very glad that you've enjoyed the site.
    All I can say is that I was not the one calling the shots in those days. There was a lengthy period when some others held the reins. I won't let that happen again!
    Best,
    Bob

  174. Bob Furmanek

    Thank you Charles, Matt and Eric. I'm very glad that you've enjoyed the site.
    All I can say is that I was not the one calling the shots in those days. There was a lengthy period when some others held the reins. I won't let that happen again!
    Best,
    Bob

    Oh, the "big names" (Joe Dante, John Landis, and all the Trailers From Hell gang) were on the advisory board for pop-history's sake, but wouldn't come through when it came to action? Any sad histories behind that we should know?

  175. I noticed a still from Money From Home on the site. Is that another one you're working on? I know you're a big Jerry Lewis fan, so it wouldn't surprise me to find out you are working on getting the rights to it.

  176. Eric: Mr. Landis and Mr. Dante were always professional and supportive of the cause.
    Bill: The Beany and Cecil image is from M.L. GUNZBURG PRESENTS NATURAL VISION THREE-DIMENSION which was the opening short to BWANA DEVIL. We have preserved and restored it from the original 35mm left/right camera negatives.
    Todd: That MONEY FROM HOME shot is from 16mm behind-the-scenes Kodachrome footage which we have preserved.
    Bob

  177. 16mm + faded anaglyph = disaster.
    By going back to the 35mm left/right elements, the quality is acceptable. We've restored LOVE FOR SALE and it looks fine. William C. Thompson was a competent DP with a long history behind the camera dating back to the teens: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0860847/
    Ed Wood used him and he knew how to shoot quick and cheap. I suspect most of these burlesque shorts were shot in just one day.

  178. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/240#post_3930783
    Ed Wood used him and he knew how to shoot quick and cheap. I suspect most of these burlesque shorts were shot in just one day.

    Nice!

  179. Bob Furmanek

    I suspect most of these burlesque shorts were shot in just one day.

    After just watching CAN CAN FOLLIES, I have to amend that statement.
    It looks like all eight Sonney shorts were done in one or two days. They probably spent a few hours on each one. The lighting is fine but the camera is locked down and never moves.
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/image/id/863369/width/236/height/257

    Ok, that Claw of the Creature has got my attention. What are you trying to say? Please tell me it's coming out in 3D…Pleeeeaase, Pretty Pleeeease.

  180. Mr. Furmanek, I'm illiterate regarding current digital 3D home video technology (with apologies to those who are not), so I thought I would offer a question pertaining to your future 3D releases. Will the titles be viewable only via 3D Blu-ray player/3D HD monitor? I had hoped to be able to acquaint myself with the golden age of 3D motion pictures using my present Blu-ray player and HD monitor, and a pair of Polaroid glasses (where does one buy those puppies, anyway?), but the posts so far imply that will not be the case. Update me, please. Thanking you in advance. Greg

  181. Greg, you need a 3D blu-ray player or PS3 and a 3D HD monitor/projector and 3D glasses to watch 3D blu-ray in the home. Only certain displays support the passive Polaroid glasses. Others require the more expensive Active Shutter glasses.

  182. greg.shoemaker

    I had hoped to be able to acquaint myself with the golden age of 3D motion pictures using my present Blu-ray player and HD monitor, and a pair of Polaroid glasses (where does one buy those puppies, anyway?), but the posts so far imply that will not be the case.

    The only 3D you could watch on your equipment would be the inferior anaglyph 3D, with red/cyan glasses. The Polaroid glasses would only work if you purchased a passive 3D TV and a Blu-ray 3D player.

  183. Again, if you use a Playstation 3 to watch Blu-ray, Sony will have already upgraded it to 3-D capability for free ( 😀 ), but you'll still need a 3D-capable screen and glasses to view the signal.
    Passive screens will let you use the "theater" glasses, but currently don't have as high resolution; Active-shutter sets may include one pair of battery/rechargeable glasses, but your brand may vary.

  184. Bob,
    Are there any plans for audio commentary tracks on the titles that the 3-D Film Archive will eventually produce? I think that the historical and technical perspectives that you, Jack, and Greg could provide would be immensely valuable to the community.

  185. Ejanss

    Well, think he meant you or one of the other 3DFA experts doing the expert/restoration commentary on the history of 3-D…Unless you can't afford yourself. 😉

    That's exactly what I meant.

  186. IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE is one of my favorite films period, and my favorite 3D one from the classic era for sure.
    This is due primarily to Bradbury's prose. Folks argue over how much is Bradbury and how much is Essex, but to me it's clear much of the dialogue is Bradbury.
    The "wind in the phone lines" bit is just magical, and I honestly feel the film is the best cinematic translation of him ever.
    I'm LONGING for a good official 3D version of this.
    Thanks again Bob for the great vintage Creature promo cuts. I love these!
    RIP MR. Bradbury.

  187. I agree, Stewart. There are many wonderful lines of dialogue in that film, and I have always loved the one you mentioned about the wind. Wonderful!
    Thanks, I'm glad you're enjoying the teaser ads. Here's number six.

    [​IMG]

  188. SAM33

    IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE is one of my favorite films period, and my favorite 3D one from the classic era for sure.
    This is due primarily to Bradbury's prose. Folks argue over how much is Bradbury and how much is Essex, but to me it's clear much of the dialogue is Bradbury.
    The "wind in the phone lines" bit is just magical, and I honestly feel the film is the best cinematic translation of him ever.
    I'm LONGING for a good official 3D version of this.

    I remember seeing an anaglyph college-theater revival of this and Creature when I was a kid, and had never seen 3-D in my life except for hearing about it as a mythical 50's Thing (Epcot was still another few years away, back then), so I never concentrated on it being Bradbury.
    Even so, as "best", it's still got Moby Dick, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and the animated TV version of "The Halloween Tree" to compete with.
    (You'll notice the conspicuous absence of "Martian Chronicles", "The Illustrated Man", or that weirdo Canadian anthology series. 🙄 )

  189. I remember seeing an anaglyph college-theater revival of this and Creature when I was a kid, and had never seen 3-D in my life except for hearing about it as a mythical 50's Thing

    Oh, I wish everybody that had to suffer through those 1972 anaglyph conversions could see them the right way…

  190. Bob Furmanek

    I remember seeing an anaglyph college-theater revival of this and Creature when I was a kid, and had never seen 3-D in my life except for hearing about it as a mythical 50's Thing

    Oh, I wish everybody that had to suffer through those 1972 anaglyph conversions could see them the right way…

    Well, why're you looking at us?…GET TO WORK on that danged Creature, already! 😛

  191. Bob,
    During the World 3-D Film Expo II, roughly a third of the Golden Age titles were shown widescreen and the remainder in academy ratio. On what were the projection aspect ratio decisions based during those those 10 days? Given some of the information you have shared on the subject, some of the choices now strike me as odd. For example, Creature from the Black Lagoon was shown in academy, then immediately followed by Revenge of the Creature in 1.85:1 on the same bill.
    Those Redheads from Seattle was also projected in academy…wasn't that film promoted as one of the first titles actually composed for widescreen?
    Were you consulted on the ARs for those screenings?

  192. THOSE REDHEADS FROM SEATTLE has the distinction of being the first non-anamorphic widescreen movie.
    I was very actively involved but I made some mistakes. My aspect ratio research was not complete at the time and the decision to run some titles in widescreen was a last minute decision. Jeff was in favor and Dan Symmes was against it. In addition, all of my notes were in New Jersey so I had to rely on memory and incomplete research.
    In short, in some cases, I was wrong!

  193. Johnny Angell

    Next, you'll tell me there's no Santa Clause.:)

    Not yet, but Disney's supposed to be working on the Blu boxset for December–Right now, they've only got the crappy third one with Martin Short.
    (I HATE that Urban-Myth Typo!…Kill it, kill it! It's CLAUS, like in the Germanic name, not as in "part of a sentence or paragraph"! :f )

  194. Thank you, James. I'm glad you enjoyed it. That day was a LOT of fun. Bob and his lovely wife Kathy are two of the best people in the world.
    We were about to head up to Bronson Canyon when we got the idea to stop at a magic shop on Hollywood Boulevard and pick up the bubble machines. That REALLY brought the footage to life. It's a quick shot but that's Jack Theakston and Jonathan Sloman working the high tech bubble apparatus. We couldn't have done it without 'em!
    And it was a childhood dream come true to walk through the entrance of the Batcave, which is another opening on the other side of this cave.
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/image/id/866916/width/482/height/277

  195. I actually discovered the Bronson Caves for myself while exploring the area on my brand new 10-speed Schwinn, circa 1973. It was a thrill to immediately recognize the site of Invasion of the Body Snatchers and such.

  196. Finally checked it out on the big small-screen (ie., the fully-converting YT-enabled 3DTV)–
    Good clear stuff, even if it was filmed in '06? I'd seen the movie too many times to count on MST3K ("Y'ever have deja vu, Joel?"), and always wondered what the Billion Bubble Machine looked like in properly restored polarization….Yes, even back then, bubbles and snowflakes were the when-in-doubt 3D money shots. 😎
    And yes, I'd seen the old Rhino anaglyph VHS (with the dopey bit of early-Rhino "graffiti" added), which's probably why I'm still hoping to see whatever messy arrangements can be conquered to getting it on disk. Ro-Man was more pop-iconic than good, but darn, those bubbles looked cool.

  197. Remembering the Duke today, 33 years after his passing.
    [​IMG]
    From Ask Yahoo: In John Wayne's own words, "There've been a lot of stories about how I got to be called Duke. One was that I played the part of a duke in a school play, which I never did. Sometimes, they even said I was descended from royalty! It was all a lot of rubbish. Hell, the truth is that I was named after a dog!"

  198. Bob Furmanek

    Remembering the Duke today, 32 years after his passing.
    [​IMG]
    From Ask Yahoo: In John Wayne's own words, "There've been a lot of stories about how I got to be called Duke. One was that I played the part of a duke in a school play, which I never did. Sometimes, they even said I was descended from royalty! It was all a lot of rubbish. Hell, the truth is that I was named after a dog!"

    June 11, 1979. 33 years?

  199. Hi Bob,
    Does the archive own a print of Murray Lerner's Sea Dream? I remember seeing it at the 2nd 3-D Fest. Might this end up on blu-ray? I'd also love to see his Magic Journeys, but I assume that's a Disney property? Do you guys own any 65/70mm 3-D materials?
    Thanks,
    Greg

  200. Hi Greg,
    No, we don't have a print of that short nor do we have any large format materials. I believe the rights are still owned by Murray Lerner.
    Next to THE BUBBLE, those shorts have some of the best off-screen effects I have ever seen.

  201. Agree 100%, Bob. The one effect that impressed me the most was the kite flying off the screen in Magic Journeys. It literally seemed to be at arm's length away. I even emailed the guy who invented the Disney camera rig, Steve Hines. IIRC, he responded that it was a combination of a wide camera interaxial for the kids on the beach, with an optically printed shot of the kite with a narrower interaxial. Whatever it was, it impressed me when I saw it. Here's his website, with several of the rigs he's built.
    http://www.hineslab.com/

  202. Bob Furmanek

    Very interesting, I'll check that out. Thanks!
    If you're in LA on June 21, here's a rare opportunity to see a screening of the digital 3-D version of HONDO: http://cinema.usc.edu/events/event.cfm?id=12757

    AAARGH! Another 3D showing of HONDO I won't be able to go to! Next time someone hears of a showing, try to give me a couple of months advance warning! HONDO is one of the few existing 3D films of the 1950s shown in the last ten years that I haven't been able to see. Any idea if it's ever coming to New York? Pete, any chance you could get it for the LaFayette?AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH!

  203. pinknik

    Agree 100%, Bob. The one effect that impressed me the most was the kite flying off the screen in Magic Journeys. It literally seemed to be at arm's length away. I even emailed the guy who invented the Disney camera rig, Steve Hines. IIRC, he responded that it was a combination of a wide camera interaxial for the kids on the beach, with an optically printed shot of the kite with a narrower interaxial. Whatever it was, it impressed me when I saw it. Here's his website, with several of the rigs he's built.
    http://www.hineslab.com/

    Ah, the kite in Magic Journeys… 😎 One of the few bits of 3-D pop-out effect I actually remember WORKING in the 80's, and still the bar I judge by.
    I remember around the same time as the early Epcot attractions, there were the attractions created for the Vancouver Expo '86 World's Fair, and the Ontario(?) exhibit had the film of Canadian industry, with the teddy bear that floats off into the audience in a dream sequence (also arm's length away). The effect was so similar, always wondered whether the two movies were related.

  204. Ejanss

    Ah, the kite in Magic Journeys… 😎 One of the few bits of 3-D pop-out effect I actually remember WORKING in the 80's, and still the bar I judge by.
    I remember around the same time as the early Epcot attractions, there were the attractions created for the Vancouver Expo '86 World's Fair, and the Ontario(?) exhibit had the film of Canadian industry, with the teddy bear that floats off into the audience in a dream sequence (also arm's length away). The effect was so similar, always wondered whether the two movies were related.

    That was Transitions and can be bought on Amazon . You would need a field-sequential system and interlaced TV to see it in 3-D though.

  205. 60 years ago today on Wednesday, June 18 1952, filming commenced in the Malibu Hills on Arch Oboler’s THE LIONS OF GULU. It was the first feature film produced in Natural Vision Three-Dimension. Released as BWANA DEVIL on November 26 1952, its tremendous success jump started the short-lived 3-D revolution in Hollywood.
    If you can cross your eyes, here's a stereo image taken on location in the Malibu Hills. Pictured behind the Natural Vision camera is its designer Lothrop Worth. In front is Director of Photography Joe Biroc. Robert Stack and Barbara Britton look happy next to the Nash Rambler.
    [​IMG]

  206. You continue to elevate the discussion of vintage 3-D with these excellent research papers, Bob. Even people who work in the industry share in the widely-held misconceptions. I would like to see that paper published in American Cinematographer or one of the Guild magazines. Why not offer it to them?
    May I suggest enlarging and bolding the font so that the text stands out against the background curtain? Some of us have tired old eyes.

    Bob Furmanek

    60 years ago today on Wednesday, June 18 1952, filming commenced in the Malibu Hills on Arch Oboler’s THE LIONS OF GULU. It was the first feature film produced in Natural Vision Three-Dimension. Released as BWANA DEVIL on November 26 1952, its tremendous success jump started the short-lived 3-D revolution in Hollywood.
    If you can cross your eyes, here's a stereo image taken on location in the Malibu Hills. Pictured behind the Natural Vision camera is its designer Lothrop Worth. In front is Director of Photography Joe Biroc. Robert Stack and Barbara Britton look happy next to the Nash Rambler.
    [​IMG]

    Appreciate the side-by-side stereo pair. Look at the size of that camera rig. The people around it give it scale.
    Reluctant to cross my eyes. The image deepens nicely when I look at it through a Lorgnette viewer which I keep next to my computer:
    [​IMG]

  207. I posted the following quotes in a DIAL M thread but it's important information and should be included in this thread as well.
    Alfred Hitchcock initially had some difficulty adapting to a 3-D, widescreen canvas. Two weeks after completion of principal photography, he was interviewed by Barbara Berch Jamison for the New York Times. He stated:

    "It was those early rushes. They looked so odd–skimpy, un-finished–."
    And Hitchcock, who received his first screen credit thirty years ago as an art director, started to sketch one of the first scenes on an old envelope.
    "See here–"these spaces on the sides–do you notice how empty they are–how bare? Well–it took me days to discover just what was wrong. Look at this–this is the flat picture–the way I used to prepare a scene. If I had three people in a scene, one up front, one slightly back, and one seated in a chair in the back of the frame. In the finished shot they'd all be up front anyway. You got no illusion of depth. Now, of course, with this 3-D thing, you have to watch out for that or you get what I got at first–lots of waste space on the sides, on the top. all around."
    After Hitchcock's first shock of discovery, the early rushes were destroyed and he started all over again.
    "Tremendous new problems with this medium. And most of them in the hands of the director. Don't let any of these actors tell you it's difficult–different. It isn't–not for them. In fact, 3-D even makes them look thinner!"
    The studio has provided him with a brand new and improved kind of three-dimensional camera for which he has great respect, but no sense of aesthetic appreciation.
    "It's a big, gross, hulking monster. It's heavy and immobile and frightening. Why–for one of my best scenes–where one of the leading players falls on a pair of scissors and kills himself–I couldn't even get this–this–thing under the scissors to create the illusion of the audience falling on those scissors itself. But we licked it. We built a big hole right under the stage and submerged the camera–so even though there will be no rocks thrown out of the screen, I don't think anybody will go home disappointed."

    Interesting to note that the POV shot was not in the finished film.
    Here's the "big, gross, hulking monster" aka All-Media camera:
    [​IMG]

  208. Bob Furmanek

    Here's a new page on the site for those interested in the Polaroid synchronization unit: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/smpte-report

    I knew the Polaroid models were advanced, but never realized how clever and well thought out they were on so many levels. Simple. Elegant.
    A lost art….
    If we needed something like this for dual 35 today, I'm sure they would sell us a $10,000 computer / analyzer combo .. And it would break often. 🙂

  209. Bob Furmanek

    This article in July 1953 drew a quick response from the good people at Polaroid:
    [​IMG]
    Two weeks later came this update:
    [​IMG]
    The special 3-D glasses designed for the kiddies will be posted soon…

    I have Boxoffice, Motion Picture Herald, etc. magazines too from the early 1950's. They did have ads for stereo speakers for cars with a box that had two speakers on the sides and one in the center. But, in all the drive-in theatres that I went too back in the 1950's I don't remember any with those type of speakers. I wonder how many if any drive-in's installed these stereo speakers.

  210. Main reason I never liked drive-ins was the sound. Looks like those speakers could do left-center-right adequately but you'd still be out of luck on the surrounds, plus the front channels really should be coming from the screen. We have a surviving drive-in here in Sacramento which has used FM radio for the sound the past 10 or so years, I tune in when driving by it but it has always sounded awful.

  211. Bob Furmanek

    Sales on CREATURE and DIAL M will speak volumes to the studios…

    Hopefully, they'll release Creature individually (and in the proper aspect ratio) sooner rather than later, so they'll have a specific number to count!

  212. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/300#post_3943078
    Now you know why I've been posting those teaser ads!
    [​IMG]

    You're the sneaky one! And I LOVE this picture!

  213. Originally Posted by Johnny Angell /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/330#post_3943190
    In honor of today's announcment of the Creature in 3D, I thought I'd post my own version of the classic poster, carved on a giant pumpkin:
    [​IMG]

    Very nice, Johnny…now, can you do it in stereoscopic???

  214. If the only way to get Creature in 3D is in this box set. . . . Somehow we need to let Universal know that Creature in 3D is the reason we are buying the set.
    Any idea as to who we can contact about this?

  215. moviebear1

    If the only way to get Creature in 3D is in this box set. . . . Somehow we need to let Universal know that Creature in 3D is the reason we are buying the set.
    Any idea as to who we can contact about this?

    How about some innocent (heehee!) letters asking where we can buy the single Blu3D release…It IS available for purchase, isn't it?
    A few hundred thousand in one week should do. 😀
    (And please, Angry Crusading Fanboys, we BEG of you: No soapboxes or crusades, here:
    Remember how we got Disney to drop the Limited Editions, after everyone started sending back their copes as "defective" for refunds, after they couldn't find the "Character Artwork on Disk"? Half of them really believed it, the other half knew when to join in and strategically cash in on the first half to hammer their point home.
    If Universal wants to believe we're innocent uninformed consumers, let us use the Weapon of the Enemy against him.) 🙂

  216. Only six more days to our 3-D shows at Eastman House in Rochester, New York. http://dryden.eastmanhouse.org/additional-program-notes/2012/06/films-in-the-3rd-dimension/
    Just added to the ROBOT MONSTER show, the incredibly rare short made by producer Al Zimbalist to introduce the film, STARDUST IN YOUR EYES. Featuring the great Slick Slaven – "He does them all" – this lost 3-D film was saved from destruction nearly 30 years ago.
    As a special bonus, if any of our HTF friends are at the show, please introduce yourself and you'll get a special gift for attending. I look forward to meeting you!
    [​IMG]

  217. Chas in CT

    Indeed.  Or if Peter could do some again at the Lafayette, but he's already said that's not possible.

    There's no reason we couldn't do it again – we still have the two projectors, the silver screen, etc. What we need to do to run double-system 3-D is to have the projector's gears temporarily modified, have the sync motors wired and installed, and probably get a new set of color-matched reflectors after all this time (plus I want one of those Polaroid sync units!). Unfortunately, those costs plus the cost of installation would make the shows a risky proposition.
    That's not to say it won't ever happen, though. 🙂

  218. This is probably located some where around here…..but….i just finished watching THE MAZE (2D) on netflix. The movie itself was good old fashioned fun (atmospheric, weird, and pretty well acted) though the "monster" is a bit of a let-down and dated. Do the elements for this movie still exists….it would be nice to see released on Blu in 3D. Who has the rights to it? Thanks.

  219. YES it is a phone junction box. . . Local artists have been doing artwork on them the last 6 months or so. This one WAS at Sunset and Normande. I drove by it yesterday and someone has painted the side with the creature completly BLACK. . . . . .What a bummer.

  220. YES it is a phone junction box. . . Local artists have been doing artwork on them the last 6 months or so. This one WAS at Sunset and Normande. I drove by it yesterday and someone has painted the side with the creature completly BLACK. . . . . .What a bummer.

  221. moviebear1

    YES it is a phone junction box. . . Local artists have been doing artwork on them the last 6 months or so. This one WAS at Sunset and Normande. I drove by it yesterday and someone has painted the side with the creature completly BLACK. . . . . .What a bummer.

    There's always gotta be a jerk around to ruin a good thing. 🙁

  222. Bob Furmanek

    Very cool, thanks Greg. My first 35mm Golden Age 3-D print was a single-strip Stereovision HOUSE OF WAX.

    There was a summer series of midnight 3-D shows here in Lexington, KY back in the early 90's. Everything was shown pretty well with the lone exception of HOUSE OF WAX. All of the other films were over/under widescreen, so they used the flat lens. HOUSE OF WAX was side by side with an anamorphic squeeze, which they didn't unsqueeze. So, we watched it in "Narrow-vision 3-D" and every character was kind of built like the Na'vi. Thankfully that was the only faux pas. Everything else was 80's movies.

  223. I understand why it was done, but I am not a fan of single-strip 3-D. It solved one crucial problem by putting the images onto one frame of film. But the host of other issues it introduced really outweighed the benefits.
    Speaking of single-strip, I've just added some more info – with CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON images – to the Pola-Lite section near the end of this article: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/what-killed-3D

  224. 3-D fest in Rochester starts tonight!

    I'd really wanted to get to it, and at this point it looks like I will be there — at least on Thursday to see Robot Monster. Wish I could make it for additional nights, but this week and the next are just totally crazy, and it's an achievement to get away for this long. It'll be a gorgeous 5+ hour drive up through the middle of the state, too, another thing I very much enjoy. I'll confirm tomorrow, but it looks like a go.

  225. Chas in CT

    3-D fest in Rochester starts tonight!  
    I'd really wanted to get to it, and at this point it looks like I will be there — at least on Thursday to see Robot Monster.  Wish I could make it for additional nights, but this week and the next are just totally crazy, and it's an achievement to get away for this long.  It'll be a gorgeous 5+ hour drive up through the middle of the state, too, another thing I very much enjoy.  I'll confirm tomorrow, but it looks like a go.

    Enjoy! Robot Monster is a lot of fun in 3-D.

  226. I'm a little late getting back here to report on a wonderful evening!

    Robot Monster is indeed GREAT fun in 3-D, and the audience — many of whom, like me, had never seen the film at all — had a rollicking good time. The "Slick Slavin" (Trustin Howard) introductory short, with some rather amazing celebrity impersonations, was a welcome additional treat.

    It's heartbreaking to see something in as fragile condition as this be denied the chance to be salvaged for future audiences.

    As far as I could tell in one short evening, the Dryden Theater is an excellent venue with a staff that seems dedicated to the mission of preserving and showing a wide range of films the way they're meant to be seen. It's too bad Rochester is kind of out of the way, because just based on their current and upcoming listings, there's no question I would be a regular attendee at Dryden and the Eastman House if distance were no object.

    The highlight of the evening, of course, was having it moderated by the perfect host! Sincere thanks to Bob for sharing the print as well as his usual expertise. It was also great to meet Jack Theakston, whose theater in Rome NY (not quite so "out there" as Rochester!) is next on my list. Between you guys and Peter and probably others I'm neglecting to recall at the moment, we are in fine hands in this neck of the woods. And sorry to be a party pooper — I could sit around talking film and theaters all night, and I'm usually the last one standing — but it had been a long day. Looking forward to more!

  227. Charles, it was truly a pleasure to meet you. Thank you so very much for making that long drive to and from Rochester.
    The shows were a big success so it's very possible there will be more dual-strip 3-D in the Dryden's future. I'll certainly keep you posted.
    I agree, seeing Ro-man with a large and appreciative audience really hit home the importance of preserving the film in 3-D. Despite the deterioration of the print, the quality of the 3-D photography came through loud and clear and I had many people tell me how good it looked in the Polaroid version.
    I even had someone identify the owner and history of the Billion Bubble Machine. How's that for a good audience!
    Bob

    [​IMG]

  228. Bob Furmanek

    I agree, seeing Ro-man with a large and appreciative audience really hit home the importance of preserving the film in 3-D. Despite the deterioration of the print, the quality of the 3-D photography came through loud and clear and I had many people tell me how good it looked in the Polaroid version.
    I even had someone identify the owner and history of the Billion Bubble Machine. How's that for a good audience!

    Robot Monster's a lot of fun with an audience, 2D or 3D–
    Our goofy all-night Sci-Fi festival showed the 2D one year (this was back before most people knew the MST3K version by heart), and while "I must…But I cannot!' got a few of the obvious snickers, the audience had fun noticing that Ro-man keeps making the exact same loop of pantomime movements every time he speaks:
    1) Point 2) Rage two fists 3) Shake one fist 4) Wipe away with both hands
    (Eg. "You hu-mans (1!)…I have made a calculating error (2!) I shall recalibrate my death ray (3!) and you shall be completely destroyed (4!)")

  229. I thoroughly enjoy ROBOT MONSTER and never tire of watching it in 3-D. Phil Tucker Jr. told me that his dad intended the movie to be seen as the nightmare of a ten year old boy. With that in mind, the dialogue and situations don't seem that absurd. Even Ro-man's Automatic Billion Bubble Machine is an extension of the toy he is playing with in the first scene.
    Considering the fact that it was shot in 12 days (not 4, as the myth states) on location in the Hollywood Hills for less than $20K with a new, un-tested camera rig, they did a very good job. The 3-D is quite effective.
    To quote Phil Tucker:

    For the budget, and for the time, I felt I had achieved greatness.

    Amen to that!
    [​IMG]

  230. Don't know if this has been mentioned, but has anyone tried watching the anaglyph 3D movies that are being streamed by some streaming service called DRIVE-IN CLASSICS? Recently the channel changed from being a subscription channel to a "free" one so I checked out the 3D listings. They had some of the classic 50's stuff along with a bunch of movies that were never in 3D to begin with. I tried to watch CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON and, of course it's anaglyph so my expectations were low, but I still enjoy that primitive home video 3D effect and not being equipped for modern day home 3D I thought I would get a kick out of it just the same. Some of the effects were actually very good and I was having a good time until suddenly they cut away to a commercial! It was then I noticed that this 80 minute movie had a stream running time listed as two hours and forty-five minutes! So much for this being a free channel. I stopped watching it and jettisoned the channel from my streamer.

  231. You mean to tell me that Warner Bros, NBC Universal and MGM/Park Circus have licensed anaglyph versions of House of Wax, Creature from the Black Lagoon, It Came from Outer Space and Bwana Devil to this channel?
    Sounds awfully phony to me.

  232. And THE MAD MAGICIAN from Columbia and many others. I too thought it was strange that they had the license to show these at all, much less in 3D, but unlike a lot of streaming channels, this one offers many titles that are not public domain. And they have national brand advertising on it, so who knows?

    I went back to the channel and I timed a few of the other 3D movies on there and they all had the correct running time. So something with CREATURE is amiss with that nearly three hour slot they have accorded it. I figured the channel was free by showing commercials before and possibly after a movie, but I hadn't counted on commercials during the movie which is what CREATURE had. Maybe the other titles do not have intermittent ads.

  233. Professor Echo

    And THE MAD MAGICIAN from Columbia and many others. I too thought it was strange that they had the license to show these at all, much less in 3D, but unlike a lot of streaming channels, this one offers many titles that are not public domain. And they have national brand advertising on it, so who knows?

    Judging from Sony's activity on other outlets, I'm making a safe guess they WEREN'T letting this channel show one of their 3D movies for commercial/free. 🙄
    It's been hard enough just finding one for rental on Vudu and PSN.

  234. Bob Furmanek

    And all seen in their original anaglyph versions?
    Sigh…

    It's an uphill battle, Bob.
    Heck, even Jack Arnold, in reference to It Came from Outer Space, once stated:
    "I thought it was a very successful film, visually, in 3-D. Wearing the red and green glasses posed no problem if the audiences' eyes were all right, but if you had a stigmatism in one eye, you could come away with a pretty huge headache."
    Full text of the interview is here. Other than the above mentioned goof, it's a very interesting interview with the legendary director focusing on his 50s sci-fi period at Universal.

  235. Thank you, James. Memories can be tricky things! I suppose the 1972 anaglyph re-issue confused him.
    Remembering the great Ernest Borgnine, 1917-2012. He worked in two Randolph Scott 3-D westerns: THE STRANGER WORE A GUN and THE BOUNTY HUNTER.
    [​IMG]

  236. Bob Furmanek

    Thank you, James. Memories can be tricky things! I suppose the 1972 anaglyph re-issue confused him…

    I meant no disrespect to the late Mr. Arnold, whose body of work I greatly admire. And yes memories are funny things. It was interesting to note how a few of the celebrity guests at the two World 3-D Expos "remembered" their scenes being shot "twice…once for 3-D and once for 2-D". Again, no disrespect intended, and certainly more than understandable after half a century!

  237. I saw STRANGER in 3D at NY's Film Forum. Joan Weldon's niece brought her there and the manager pointed them out to me. I said hello afterwards, and told her that Scott made the wrong choice choosing Trevor over her, which made her laugh (and was true; Trevor's dull in the movie. "She was the bigger star!" Weldon said.)

  238. Beautiful. Thanks for the heads up.

    In a continuing desire to show all possible support for these 3-D releases, I just pre-ordered this — on top of my US and UK pre-orders for the Monsters sets. (At some point I'm going to have to choose between those two sets, but it would be great to have this separate release anyway. Or it could make a great gift.)

  239. Oooh…that's a temptation. I dig the Universal monster movies, but September/October is looking mighty expensive and if I can get just CREATURE it might be worth it to do that and pass on the Monsters set for now. I will need to think on this.

  240. Todd J Moore

    Oooh…that's a temptation. I dig the Universal monster movies, but September/October is looking mighty expensive and if I can get just CREATURE it might be worth it to do that and pass on the Monsters set for now. I will need to think on this.

    Me too. I pre-ordered the box because of CREATURE in 3D but may opt for the single disc now.

  241. This discussion was in the recent HOUSE OF WAX thread. I'd like to include the documentation on 3-D Golden Age stereophonic sound titles here as well.
    WarnerPhonic Stereo utilized a full-coat 35mm magnetic track for the left, center and right speakers behind the screen and a mono optical track for the surround channel. The 35mm full-coat audio was on a separate roll that was interlocked with the two projectors that ran the left/right 3-D images, and the surround track was on the right print of the feature. The left print contained a mono optical composite track of the entire four channels and served as an emergency audio back-up in case the dubber went out of sync with the picture.
    [​IMG]
    The original Warnerphonic stereo tracks are lost. It was an important element in the original presentation and was the first time that most people had heard stereophonic sound with a motion picture. Previous stereo films (Fantasia, This is Cinerama) were limited to a select few theaters in big cities. Warnerphonic was installed in most of the major cities, and smaller towns as well such as the Rialto in Juliet, the Madison in Peoria and the Midway in Rockford, ILL; the Palace in South Bend, IN; the California in Stockton and the Buena in Ventura, CA; the Kenosha, Bay in Green Bay, Rauli in Oshkosh and the Majestic in Beloit, WI.
    Here's how it was promoted at the 1,739 seat Madison in Peoria.
    [​IMG]
    With fully directional sound and voices/effects that emanated from the sides and rear of the auditorium (during the fire in the wax museum, etc.) it helped to immerse the viewer in the action adding an important element to the superb realism of the dimensional photography. For instance, at one point Phylis Kirk discovers her friends body in wax. Vincent Price then says from the back of the theater, "You shouldn't have done that, my dear." People in the audience were startled, to say the least.
    As an example of the important role of sound in this presentation, the New York Paramount installed 25 surround speakers throughout the huge auditorium for the premiere.
    16 of the 50 Golden Age 3-D features are confirmed to have had stereophonic sound.
    The Charge at Feather River – Warnerphonic 4-track
    The Command – Warnerphonic unconfirmed. Might be 3 channel only. (Filmed twice, the 3-D version was never released)
    House of Wax – Warnerphonic 4-track

    The following were 3-track interlock magnetic: left, center and right behind the screen:
    Cease Fire
    Devil's Canyon
    Fort Ti
    I the Jury
    Inferno
    It Came from Outer Space
    Kiss Me Kate
    The Maze
    Miss Sadie Thompson
    Second Chance
    The Stranger Wore a Gun
    Those Redheads from Seattle
    Wings of the Hawk
    These two Paramount titles are listed as stereo in some pre-release trade ads as well as the studio-issued pressbooks. However, I can find no concrete evidence that any of them were actually exhibited with stereophonic sound.
    Flight to Tangier
    Money from Home

    These four Columbia titles list stereophonic sound in the pressbooks. They utilize the same ad mat with the stereo sound/widescreen artwork. These are not even listed as stereo in the trade ads. I'm very skeptical that they were available in that format.
    Drums of Tahiti
    Gun Fury
    Jesse James vs. the Daltons
    The Nebraskan
    The survival rate is poor. The only three to exist intact are It Came from Outer Space, Kiss Me Kate and Wings of the Hawk. The mono surround tracks exist for House of Wax and Charge at Feather River.

  242. Thanks Bob for the nice Ernest Borgnine tribute — by the way, his last 3D movie was the 2011 animated feature "The Lion of Judah" — not too many stars were ever featured in three 3D movies!
    Here's two more bits of trivia — there's a scene where Ernest Borgnine and co ride down a slightly steep hill in "The Stranger Wore A Gun" — not only was this the first time Ernest had riden a horse, as he told it in a 'Private Screenings' special on him, it was the first time he even sat on a horse. He never told the director Andre De Toth, but sensed co-star Lee Marvin knew.
    Also years later on a movie set (I think it was "The Dirty Dozen", filming in England), Ernest went to his old friend Lee with a portrait of Lee and Ernest asked if he could sign it for him. "Why, cert-ainly!" said Lee and wrote "To Ernest — Love, Randolph Scott" — to which Ernest replied "You ratfink!"

  243. Hearing about House Of Wax is truely exciting news. Up till now the only Official 3-D release was in Japan on a now forgotten Video Disc system that was Alternate Field.
    I am hot to get my hands on this version as I am sure it will be better than any other versions out there. The only downside is this is the first announcement and preparing it could take up to a year before it's ready for release.
    I just want it in my hands. . . . . .yesterday.

  244. Brian McP

    Thanks Bob for the nice Ernest Borgnine tribute — by the way, his last 3D movie was the 2011 animated feature "The Lion of Judah" — not too many stars were ever featured in three 3D movies!…

    His costar, Lee Marvin, was in three Golden Age 3-D films:
    Stranger Wore a Gun
    Gun Fury
    Gorilla at Large
    as was Richard Carlson:
    It Came from Outer Space
    Creature from the Black Lagoon
    The Maze
    and Nestor Paiva:
    I, The Jury
    Creature from the Black Lagoon
    Revenge of the Creature
    and of course Vincent Price was in four:
    House of Wax
    The Mad Magician
    Dangerous Mission
    Son of Sinbad
    Quite a few actors were in two GA 3-D titles: Rock Hudson, Charles Bronson, Julie Adams, Barbara Rush…
    Probably many more I'm missing. Fun trivia. It would be interesting to compile a cross-referenced list of some sort.

  245. Bob Furmanek

    That's a good list James, but you missed the King of 3-D: the only actor that appeared in five Golden Age features. Who is he?

    Well..
    I missed Rhonda Fleming as being in the "three" club:
    Inferno
    Jiavaro
    Those Redheads from Seattle
    and I also missed that Nestor Paiva was also in:
    Jivaro
    so he get to join Vincent in the "four" club
    ..but I'm drawing a blank on the King.
    Tell us Bob…

  246. …this is getting to be fun!
    More Golden Age 3-D "three film" club members:
    Richard Denning:
    Creature from the Black Lagoon
    The Glass Web
    Jivaro
    Patricia Medina:
    Drums of Tahiti
    Phantom of the Rue Morgue
    Sangaree

  247. Another Golden Age 3-D "three film" club member:
    Paul Picerni:
    The Bounty Hunter
    House of Wax
    The Charge at Feather River*
    *Picerni's scenes were deleted according to IMDb
    I'm still at a loss regarding the "five film" actor. I'm sure I'll kick myself when you reveal him/her.

  248. Bob Furmanek

    Yes, the King is male.
    According to IMDB, Paul Picerni was in CHARGE AT FEATHER RIVER but his part was deleted. This is the first I've heard of this. Did Picerni discuss this in his auto-biography?

    Oops, you are correct. I added a caveat to my earlier post.
    I haven't read his auto-biography, but he was a delightful guest at the World 3-D Expo.

  249. Bob Furmanek

    I'd like to get some documented confirmation of that. I don't take everything on IMDB to be gospel.
    He was a great guest and a wonderful story teller!

    I found several other Internet sites with the same info. Of course, they very well may have used IMDb as their source!
    I'll trust you'll check with your own industry sources and update us at some point.

  250. Bob Furmanek

    That's part of the problem. Everybody seems to use IMDB or the Hayes book for their 3-D data. I can't even begin to list the mistakes in that book.

    IMDB is better than it use to be but still has a lot of errors.

  251. That's awesome Bob! Thanks for letting your thread be temporarily hijacked for a little 3-D trivial pursuit.
    Btw, speaking of Taza, I was on vacation last month in Moab, Utah with my family. We went horseback riding at Red Cliffs Lodge, near Castle Valley and Professor Valley where around 80% of all location shooting is done on films shot in Utah (including Taza). Red Cliffs Lodge also has a "movie museum" (which is little more than some pictures on the walls, but at least tastefully presented) and Taza was well represented:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    As we toured Arches, Canyonlands, and Dead Horse Point (3 of the locations used in Taza), I wasn't actively trying to seek out locations from Taza, but nonetheless when we returned and examined our photos, I discovered we had hit on some pretty close matches:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

  252. So many stereo/surround tracks missing. What has happened to them? Shuffled and stashed until they're just no longer "findable"? Actually lost or destroyed? Or is this a matter of deterioration of known elements? All of the above?
    Thanks.
    P.S. Is this a problem among 2-D projects as well?

  253. Those pictures are fabulous, thanks James.
    The magnetic tracks don't survive because after their theatrical life, they were considered useless by the studios. 16mm prints and television broadcasts were done from mono optical elements, so the 3 channel stereo sound was thought to be of little value.
    They were either erased and re-used, or allowed to deteriorate. Vinegar syndrome is particularly common among magnetic elements.

  254. Brian, thank you for the Ernest Borgnine trivia. I'm sorry that I never got to meet him. By all accounts, he was a genuinely nice man.
    One more name for the triple 3-D club, Joanne Dru.
    Hannah Lee
    Southwest Passage
    September Storm
    I suppose the last title counts as Golden Age, right?

  255. Thanks for the kind word Bob and he was my idol, God knows I had enough time to do it, my own fault — if we had met him, we'd have been one of those who could have pronounced themselves as "The Man That Shook The Hand of Ernest Borgnine" (a reference to his last, unreleased film — I wonder who one day will use that title for something?)
    Speaking of Joanne Dru, she was his 'romantic' interest in the Terence Hill comedy "Supersnooper" (1980) (aka "Super Fuzz")
    And thanks for all those great stars who appeared in the golden age 3D movies — yet you have to admit, Ernest was the only of that group to live through two eras of 3D movies (even though "Lion of Judah" wasn't exactly "House of Wax")

  256. Multiples in the modern era include:
    Bill Paxton
    Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over
    Ghosts of the Abyss
    Magnificient Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D (narrator)
    And if you count converted re-issues, Titanic
    Tom Hanks
    The Polar Express
    Toy Story 3 (again, Toy Story 1 and 2 if you count conversions)
    Liam Neeson
    Clash of the Titans
    Wrath of the Titans
    Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menance
    Sam Worthington
    Avatar
    Clash of the Titans
    Wrath of the Titans
    Ving Rhames
    Piranha 3D
    Piranha 3DD
    I know for a fact I'm missing a bunch of people, but yeah, there ya go.

  257. pinknik

    I wouldn't count anything that wasn't done in front of two lenses, but that could just be me.

    So, no Nicholas Cage for "Drive Angry" and "Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance", then?
    (And since it wasn't in front of lenses, no Jim Carrey for "A Christmas Carol" and "IMAX: Under the Sea", either?
    Well, how about John Turturro for "Nutcracker 3D", "Cars 2" and "Transformers 3: Dark of the Moon"?)

  258. We're currently working on a detailed article about the 3-D comics of the 1950's. It should be ready and on our site next week. Here's something I hadn't realized: there were 50 features produced in the Golden Age and 51 3-D comics released between July 1953 and the spring of 1954. They died an even faster death than the movies!
    [​IMG]

  259. RolandL

    Daniel Symmes book Amazing 3-D has reprints of some of the 1950's 3-D comics.

    The reprints in Symmes book never looked all that spectacular to me. I always suspected it had something to do with the paper quality and texture. I'm looking forward to the on-line versions!

  260. Originally Posted by pinknik /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/420#post_3953286
    So far as I know, Drive Angry was actually shot in 3-D, but, yeah, if it's a conversion, I don't really consider it a 3-D movie. Pointless, I know, but my opinion.

    I'm almost positive Drive Angry was shot 3D. There's a completely different visual feel watching it as opposed to something converted to 3D like The Green Hornet or Green Lantern.

  261. DRIVE ANGRY was shot in native 3-D.
    To distance themselves from the various and often shoddy 2-D to 3-D conversions, some of the trailers and posters went out of their way to add a "Shot in 3-D" blurb.
    [​IMG]

  262. Bob Furmanek

    We're currently working on a detailed article about the 3-D comics of the 1950's. It should be ready and on our site next week. Here's something I hadn't realized: there were 50 features produced in the Golden Age and 51 3-D comics released between July 1953 and the spring of 1954. They died an even faster death than the movies!
    [​IMG]

    That is some EXCELLENT promotional art, Bob! I've never seen that one before.
    I always wanted to see the rumored 3rd EC 3-D Comicbook that was never released. The 1st two 3-D ECs were outstanding for their time.

  263. Originally Posted by GregK /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/420#post_3953426
    DRIVE ANGRY was shot in native 3-D.
    To distance themselves from the various and often shoddy 2-D to 3-D conversions, some of the trailers and posters went out of their way to add a "Shot in 3-D" blurb.

    Yeah, but it didn't help the picture at the box office.

  264. The second one pictured above – that's the first one, and it was reprinted at least once, but mine's a first edition.
    Actually they aren't too hard to come by or expensive in "read" condition, but if you have one with the glasses the prices shoot up.
    SAM33

  265. In specific order, the second one Roland has pictured was the first of the 3D comics. It came in a standard size and a larger size, as did the first 3-D Comics featuring Tor. The one Bob pictured was the second Mighty Mouse 3-D issue. The third and last was the first one Roland pictured. It took until the 1980s for a 3-D comic book character to have four issues, and I believe that may have been Eclipse comics 3 Stooges issues. Either that or it was one of the Blackthorne comics.But back to the 1950s. Archer St. John put so much stock in 3D comics that when the market crumbled, it took St. John out as well. And if you thought nobody would be stupid enough to repeat that mistake, both Eclipse and Blackthorne did so in the 1980s. Curiously, the 80s 3-D comic book craze happened a couple of years after the movie craze. The first one of the 80s, BATTLE FOR A THREE DIMENSIONAL WORLD, was released by 3D Video Corporation and was more or less a promotion for their company as well as an abbreviated history of 3D up to 1982. Eclipse and Blackthorne got into the market in 1985, right around the time STARCHASER: THE LEGEND OF ORIN hit theaters and had a good couple of years run. Funny enough, but Marvel and DC tentatively tossed their hats into the ring in the 1990s with DC leading off with a BATMAN 3D graphic novel. DC, of course, did 3D Batman and Superman issues in the 1950s.
    We know return you to your regularly scheduled discussion.

  266. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/420#post_3957324
    I checked a few images with the HONDO TV glasses and found the red layer is fading a bit on the gell. If you see any double-image on the restored artwork, it's the glasses!

    My glasses are still quite clean and the red gel remarkably deep. But if they ever start to fade I have plenty more tucked away out of the light.

    As you say, the artwork's 3D is razor sharp, much better than my actual THREE DIMENSION COMICS from the 1950s!

  267. I managed to find a very clean and intact pair of red/blue 3D glasses at the bottom of a drawer. Looking at the 3D comic page, it's extremely well done. Crisp and clear, and with nice little touches, like the depth separation of the first two letters of BOOM. These comics would have been wonderful to read as a kid.
    Now that we've got our 3D glasses out, it's interesting to see that NASA has just released anaglyph 3D images and videos of the Sun here:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/news/stereo3D_press.html
    The pictures are nothing spectacular in 3D to my eyes, but the videos (at the bottom of the page) look quite good.

  268. I managed to find a very clean and intact pair of red/blue 3D glasses at the bottom of a drawer. Looking at the 3D comic page, it's extremely well done. Crisp and clear, and with nice little touches, like the depth separation of the first two letters of BOOM. These comics would have been wonderful to read as a kid.

    Koroush: I'm using the same proprietary restoration techniques that we utilized for the anaglyph extractions of PLASTICON, CRESPINEL and A DAY IN THE COUNTRY. http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/3-d-lost-and-found
    By extracting the separate left/right artwork and doing restoration, we're able to create a new red/cyan anaglyph image that is superior to what was seen in 1953.
    In short, the comic book images have never looked this good before. There will be many scans on the website in our upcoming article.

  269. Doug, that's a fabulous article. Thank you very much for posting. HOUSE OF WAX was a tremendous success at the Warner Theatre, Leicester Square. I don't have the exact data right in front of me, but I think it played for 22 weeks!
    I'm working on a detailed article for our website on the Golden Age 3-D films released with stereophonic sound. May I utilize that article on our site?
    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com

  270. Bob Furmanek

    Doug, that's a fabulous article. Thank you very much for posting. HOUSE OF WAX was a tremendous success at the Warner Theatre, Leicester Square. I don't have the exact data right in front of me, but I think it played for 22 weeks!
    I'm working on a detailed article for our website on the Golden Age 3-D films released with stereophonic sound. May I utilize that article on our site?
    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com

    Bob – Fine with me!

  271. Bob Furmanek

    Thank you, James. I'm glad you enjoyed it. That day was a LOT of fun. Bob and his lovely wife Kathy are two of the best people in the world.
    We were about to head up to Bronson Canyon when we got the idea to stop at a magic shop on Hollywood Boulevard and pick up the bubble machines. That REALLY brought the footage to life. It's a quick shot but that's Jack Theakston and Jonathan Sloman working the high tech bubble apparatus. We couldn't have done it without 'em!
    And it was a childhood dream come true to walk through the entrance of the Batcave, which is another opening on the other side of this cave.
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/image/id/866916/width/482/height/277

    "The Creature from The Black Lagoon" will be shown for one week, October 12 -18, in what is billed as a new DCP restoration in 3D at the Film Forum in NYC.

  272. So…If you were a milkman and wanted to see it at 10AM, would all the housewives come up to you and try to place their orders? If you were a career girl, and only had time to see the movie at 6PM, would the shop girls kick your ass? Was the midnight showing a racist suggestion? Or were they expecting actual ghosts to show up? Can ghosts even see in 3D?
    Just have to ask these questions; the segregational audience suggestions seem awfully cornball at the present time! If you're an owl, you can only see the movie at 4AM. That kinda sucks, let me tell you! Just what did they have against owls back in the 50s, anyway?
    All kidding aside–were they really expecting all those stars to show up at some point? Were those promotional considerations, or just a bunch of film stars who happened to mention they'd end up seeing the movie at some point? Because I can't imagine some of those heavier hitters out there touting a movie like "House of Wax" in the first place; even if it was a mandatory studio promotion. I think some of those stars weren't even under contract at Warners anyway; looks like a lot of Metro stars in there. Must be a press release gone haywire. Would have loved to been able to tell people I watched House of Wax seated alongside Gracie Allen and Charlton Heston, though!

  273. A good number of stars did show up for that 24 marathon.

    Matt, that is an excellent advert. Thanks for sharing! I still have some of your expertly done 3-D promotional pins from the 3-D Expo.

  274. RolandL

    Before Vincent is going to put her in the vat of wax. It's implied that she is naked.

    Ah, implied nudity. Kind of like the fellow who waves the vermouth cork over the martini shaker and says "vermouth" and recorks the bottle. Both light on ingredients and both unsatisfying:)

  275. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/450#post_3961828
    We remember Joe Kubert, 1926-2012: a brilliant artist and one of the developers of 3-D comic books. Here's the opening page from TOR, published October, 1953. The blue lens is for the right eye.
    [​IMG]

    Joe Kubert's GONE?!? I remember his Sgt. Rock and Enemy Ace illustrations for DC Comics back in the '60's and '70's…his son Adam's currently doing illustrations for them today. RIP, Joe…

  276. I agree, James. Mr. Elliot gave the most heartfelt and emotional introduction at the 2003 screening of I, THE JURY.
    [​IMG]
    When I was introduced to him as the one who had found the lost 3-D print, he gave me a big hug and treated me like an old friend. We had lunch and he could not have been nicer.
    It's been my hope to get this film restored and out on 3-D Blu-ray and we've been working on it for quite some time now. The current copyright holder prefers it remain buried in the vaults but we haven't given up yet…

  277. I won't but they are being frustratingly difficult. They've owned the film for many years and have zero interest in the property. Yet, when you try to negotiate a distribution deal, they are not interested.
    VERY frustrating, to say the least!

  278. For the life of me, I'll never understand that mentality. Someone has it within their power to share something, at no burden to themselves, which would make many other people happy…and they refuse. 🙁
    How and why do such parties obtain rights to properties they don't want in the first place?

  279. I suspect it's considered an asset which they can utilize in financial matters.
    The Archive offered to cover the cost of a full restoration of the left/right sides and they declined.
    They won't even tell us if they have the 35mm negative materials.

  280. Yep, just like the Laurel and Hardy properties when owned by either Hallmark and Richard Feiner & Associates….
    I know this is the 3D thread and don't want to get off-topic, but I couldn't let that dead-on comment go by without nominating one other case of 'the same mentality', the filmwork as corporate asset — and while the films moulder away in film cans, 3D or otherwise, generations will never know their magic and will wonder what all these oldtimers are raving about when remembering the time they saw these golden shadows…..

  281. Greg, I wish I had some positive news. My goal to have something out for the 60th anniversary in late November is not going to happen. 🙁
    I truly wish I had something more positive and definite to share.
    Thank you for asking.
    Best,
    Bob

  282. Well while I'm disappointed, it's just in the delay because I so want more classic 3D content, not in your efforts.
    Please know many of us support you and will be glad to have the results of all your work whenever you can manage to get them out.
    Hang in there!

  283. Thanks, Stewart. The problem is not on my end. I've had content ready to go since early this year. It's the potential distributors that are slowing up the process and causing delays in getting to a finished product.
    Bob

  284. Bob Furmanek

    I won't but they are being frustratingly difficult. They've owned the film for many years and have zero interest in the property. Yet, when you try to negotiate a distribution deal, they are not interested.
    VERY frustrating, to say the least!

    To me, these kind of people aren't film enthusiasts, just greedy pigs.
    Almost treating the film like they're a dictator dangling the film in front of the townspeople, saying "look what I have and you don't"
    I'd be very interested in seeing this hitting 3D bluray.

  285. Animation historian and 3-D Archive friend Tommy Jose Stathes has contributed some reel treasures to this upcoming evening of rare animation on TCM. http://www.tcm.com/schedule/index.html?tz=est&sdate=2012-10-21
    Don't forget to check it out and please tell all your friends.
    Here's the Bray Animation Project website: http://brayanimation.weebly.com/
    Tommy is a terrific guy and reminds me of the passion and dedication that I had thirty years ago toward preserving our 3-D film heritage. I applaud his efforts and wish him much deserved success!
    Bob

  286. Bob Furmanek

    Animation historian and 3-D Archive friend Tommy Jose Stathes has contributed some reel treasures to this upcoming evening of rare animation on TCM. http://www.tcm.com/schedule/index.html?tz=est&sdate=2012-10-21
    Don't forget to check it out and please tell all your friends.
    Here's the Bray Animation Project website: http://brayanimation.weebly.com/
    Tommy is a terrific guy and reminds me of the passion and dedication that I had thirty years ago toward preserving our 3-D film heritage. I applaud his efforts and wish him much deserved success!
    Bob

    Thanks for the heads up.
    I cut and pasted this over in the TCM thread in TV programming so people will know.

  287. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/480#post_3979007
    Here's an excellent article by David Bordwell on DIAL M. http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2012/09/07/dial-m-for-murder-hitchcock-frets-not-at-his-narrow-room/
    One correction to his text. The film was entirely photographed with the All-Media camera, not the Natural Vision rig.

    What a fascinating read. Thanks for posting the link and suggesting it.

  288. Blu-ray dot com's Dial M for Murder review is up. Low marks for the 3-D. He talks about it being "pretty flat", but I wonder if he has ever seen it properly projected? He also talks about "ringing anomalies". Hmm…

  289. JamesNelson

    Blu-ray dot com's Dial M for Murder review is up. Low marks for the 3-D. He talks about it being "pretty flat", but I wonder if he has ever seen it properly projected? He also talks about "ringing anomalies". Hmm…

    I wonder how much else is inaccurate in his review when he opens with this howler:

    Dial M for Murder would have been an odd inclusion in the Alfred Hitchcock oeuvre in any case, but the fact that it was released in (anaglyph) 3D in the waning days of the short-lived early fifties' 3D craze makes it easily one of the oddest films Hitch ever directed.

  290. I just tried to post in the Blu-ray.com forum on DIAL M but it won't let me sign in. If anybody is able to do so, please post the following:
    3-D films in 1953/54 were not shown open matte 1.37. They were shown in the studio/director intended widescreen ratio.
    DIAL M was never shown anywhere in anaglyph. WB has never even created an anaglyph version of the film. The one that is making the rounds is a bootleg created from a field-sequential Japanese laser disc.
    DIAL M premiered in 3-D but played most engagements flat in 1954. Please link to this page and myth number nine: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths
    Many thanks!
    Bob

  291. Bob Furmanek

    I just tried to post in the Blu-ray.com forum on DIAL M but it won't let me sign in. If anybody is able to do so, please post the following:
    3-D films in 1953/54 were not shown open matte 1.37. They were shown in the studio/director intended widescreen ratio.
    DIAL M was never shown anywhere in anaglyph. WB has never even created an anaglyph version of the film. The one that is making the rounds is a bootleg created from a field-sequential Japanese laser disc.
    DIAL M premiered in 3-D but played most engagements flat in 1954. Please link to this page and myth number nine: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths
    Many thanks!
    Bob

    Done.
    link

  292. Bob Furmanek

    Only the small images are available in a larger size. After all the restoration work, I didn't want to give the stuff away!

    Understood.
    Beautiful work on the restorations. Kudos and gratitude to you and your team!

  293. Bob Furmanek

    Here's another before/after example showing our anaglyph restoration technique for those wonderful 3-D comic books. Don't forget to place the blue lens over your right eye. If you'd like to see more, check out the new article on our website: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/images-from-the-archive/comic-books

    My grandchildren and I just spend a great hour going over all the 3-D comic book images on your web site. We had more fun grabbing at all the protruding objects coming at you.
    Thank you so much for providing us access to your site and for all the wonderful work you have done to help keep the wonderful 3-D era alive!!! :tu:

  294. Bob Furmanek

    Wow, that's great John, thank you so very much! I couldn't imagine a nicer compliment.
    I really appreciate your sharing this with your grandchildren. May I ask how old they are?

    Of course, 10 (boy) and 12 (girl)…the perfect age see what I remember and what they missed!

  295. Hey Bob,
    I do hate to be contadictory, but in fact, both DIAL M FOR MURDER and HOUSE OF WAX were issued on anaglyphic 16mm in the early 1980s. Swank had them at the time. Those prints seem to have faded or some such, but they did exist. I remember seeing an old Swank catalog that had both of them, IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE, CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON, and REVENGE OF THE CREATURE listed. This must have been from around 1980 or 1981.

  296. I do hate to be contadictory, but in fact, both DIAL M FOR MURDER and HOUSE OF WAX were issued on anaglyphic 16mm in the early 1980s. Swank had them at the time

    DIAL M and HOUSE OF WAX never had anaglyph re-issues. For the Universal titles – yes.

  297. GregK

    DIAL M and HOUSE OF WAX never had anaglyph re-issues. For the Universal titles – yes.

    Again, maybe not in 35mm, but definitely 16mm. I distinctly remember the catalogs. If I can ever find a copy, I will scan it.

  298. Sorry to disagree Todd, but I'm with Greg on this one. I've been monitoring this stuff since the late 1970's and have never seen, or heard of, anaglyph 16mm prints of those films.
    If they had been done, somebody in the collectors market would have known about them. I'm not saying you didn't see the listing, but it had to be a typo. WB has never converted them.

  299. That ny times article is a tad dismissive of Jack Arnold and the Creature:

    For a capable genre craftsman like Jack Arnold, 3-D was an engaging gimmick, as “Creature” amply demonstrates. But for an artist like Hitchcock, that same gimmick could become wonderfully, sublimely expressive. Almost 60 years later its potential remains to be fully explored.

  300. There are a couple of publicity photos of the creature in color at the beginning of the article which show his lips to be red. I've seen this before in artwork, but not what appear to be unretouched photos. Were the creature's lips actually red on the set?
    As for the shot of he creature getting amorous, I knew he had it in him:)

  301. Bob Furmanek

    Those are original un-retouched Kodachrome images taken on the set. The color is authentic.

    I think they may actually be Ektachromes. The originals in the Life magazine photo archive hosted by Google haven't been color-corrected and they exhibit the kind of color shift to the purple of the medium-format Ektachromes in our family collection (in our case 2-1/4 square from 120 roll film) from that period. It's quite different from the typical fading to red-orange that most mid-50s 35mm Ektachromes have taken on. A Kodachrome wouldn't show any color fading or shift.
    Here's a comparison of a shot from the article vs. the version in the Life archive.

  302. Very special thanks to John Steffens for these nice words about our 3-D presentation at Panasonic:

    Bob Furmanek treated us to some Golden Age 3D film clips. Stuff that he guarantees us will never see the light of day. There were some truly fun and great 3D material.
    All of the following clips were shown on 3D Blu-ray that Bob and his team created.
    Kelley's Plasticon Pictures (short, 1922) Earliest extant 3D film in black & white
    Bwana Devil (1952) Earliest color 3D film. This was the one that was in the poorest quality.
    It Came From Outer Space (1953) The first 3D film trailer.
    Robot Monster (1953) Bob says the person that owns this film flat out refuses to release this and restore it.
    Hannah Lee (1953) ditto
    Money From Home (1953) A Martin & Lewis movie
    Hypnotic Hick- A Woody Woodpecker cartoon
    Hawaiian Nights (short, 1954) We were only the second audience to ever see this film in 3-D. It had played flat only in 1954.
    Revenge of the Creature (1955)
    Everyone had a lot of fun watching these. Bwana Devil, Robot Monster and Revenge of the Creature got the most laughs in the style of MT3K.

    Bob and his team put together a great presentation that any studio needs to see in order to see that these types of films and shorts are worth saving and making sure they stay in its original form of polarized 3D.
    It's also to show that Bob knows what he's doing and needs to be brought on board when these things are converted to 3-D Blu-ray.

    I'll just add this to John's comments. With the exception of KELLY'S PLASTICON PICTURES, none of the clips that we showed were from restored/preserved elements. However, all of the material has potential to be released on 3-D Blu-ray. It's up to the studios to recognize the value of this wonderful stereoscopic material.
    With our combined 50 years of experience in working with Golden Age 3-D elements, we can do the best job possible and insure that all of these films are presented flawlessly, with all vertical, sizing and convergence errors corrected for the optimum 3-D viewing experience.
    In short, with today's technology and our restoration techniques, this Golden Age 3-D material can truly look better than ever before!
    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com

  303. Bob Furmanek

    Oh no, not at all.
    PLASTICON is owned by the Archive and will be released as soon as we can secure a distribution deal.

    I too really enjoyed the 3D presentation. Sorry if this has been mentioned before but what titles does the Archive own? Is Twilight Time interested in being a distributor?

  304. Bob Furmanek

    Thanks Matt and Roland, glad you enjoyed it!
    I've sent a letter and I'm waiting for their reply.
    The material that we own is listed on our Home Page: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com

    I remember the Twilight Time staff talking about how far out in the future they have already committed to release specific titles. Was it six months or a year? They also seemed to be stressed about having the ability and time to release four titles a month. If they do decide to distribute your titles, it will be a while before they can get to it. Maybe a year?

  305. We remember Ray Zone, the "King of 3-D Comics." I had the great pleasure of spending time with Ray at the two 3-D Expo's in Hollywood and will always remember his love, support and enthusiasm for 3-D motion pictures and preservation.
    Rest in peace, Ray.
    ==== From the Yahoo 3DTV newsgroup ===============
    It is with great sadness that I must report the sudden passing of our
    friend Ray Zone.
    Ray passed away on Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles. He leaves a
    long legacy as an author, publisher, historian, photographer,
    filmmaker and artist. A longtime advocate of stereography as an art
    form, he earned the title "King of 3-D Comics" for publishing or
    producing the 3-D separations for over 130 3-D comic books. Ray was a
    longtime member and past President of the LA 3-D Club, and was
    currently serving as the club's Vice President.
    And he was my mentor and dear friend. Rest in peace.
    Eric Kurland
    President
    Los Angeles 3-D Club (SCSC)

  306. This is sad news. Ray Zone's enthusiasm and talent will be sorely missed. In addition to his comics publishing he was also a disciplined historian of steroscopic technology. Everyone should his read book Stereoscopic Cinema and the Origins of 3-D Film, 1838-1952 available from amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/Stereoscopic-Cinema-Origins-Film-1838-1952/dp/0813124611/ref=la_B001JSBJA2_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1353035148&sr=1-3
    This past summer Ray published two more books on stereoscopic cinema, which I now realize will become part of his considerable legacy:
    3-D Revolution: The History of Modern Stereoscopic Cinema
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0813136113/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=
    3-DIY: Stereoscopic Moviemaking on an Indie Budget
    http://www.amazon.com/3-DIY-Stereoscopic-Moviemaking-Indie-Budget/dp/0240817079/ref=pd_sim_b_4
    Don't hesitate. Buy them now.

  307. Bob Furmanek

    We remember Ray Zone, the "King of 3-D Comics." I had the great pleasure of spending time with Ray at the two 3-D Expo's in Hollywood and will always remember his love, support and enthusiasm for 3-D motion pictures and preservation.
    Rest in peace, Ray.
    ==== From the Yahoo 3DTV newsgroup ===============
    It is with great sadness that I must report the sudden passing of our
    friend Ray Zone.
    Ray passed away on Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles. He leaves a
    long legacy as an author, publisher, historian, photographer,
    filmmaker and artist. A longtime advocate of stereography as an art
    form, he earned the title "King of 3-D Comics" for publishing or
    producing the 3-D separations for over 130 3-D comic books. Ray was a
    longtime member and past President of the LA 3-D Club, and was
    currently serving as the club's Vice President.
    And he was my mentor and dear friend. Rest in peace.
    Eric Kurland
    President
    Los Angeles 3-D Club (SCSC)

    Very sad news. But thanks for letting us know. He clearly was one of the greats in 3D.

  308. Sixty years ago, on November 26, 1952, Arch Oboler's African adventure had its world premiere in Hollywood and Los Angeles at the Paramount theatres. Produced on a modest budget and photographed in dual-strip Natural Vision, this 3-D attraction was a tremendous success.
    Within two months, nearly every studio in Hollywood had a 3-D feature in production. Warner Bros. began filming House of Wax; Paramount started re-shooting Sangaree (it had begun as a flat production); Universal-International started on It Came from Outer Space; RKO sent a crew to Mexico for Second Chance; Columbia began to rush Man in the Dark and Fort Ti through production and MGM started on Arena. Even budget conscious Allied Artists got on the dimensional bandwagon with The Maze.
    The 3-D craze hit a fever pitch throughout the summer of 1953. At any one time, moviegoers had their choice of several first run 3-D films in all the major cities. By the fall, poor projection and falling grosses led to its first decline, and the introduction of CinemaScope in September ("The Modern Miracle You See Without the Use of Special Glasses") was another nail in the stereoscopic coffin. Full details can found in this article, What Killed 3-D? http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/what-killed-3D
    3-D had a brief resurgence in the winter with a number of high profile entries, including Hondo, Kiss Me Kate, Cease Fire, Money from Home, Miss Sadie Thompson and Creature from the Black Lagoon. However, by the spring of 1954, 3-D was boxoffice poison. The few remaining titles were released with little fanfare, or went out in standard 2-D only.
    The 3-D craze was a quick one, but fondly remembered by those old enough to have experienced it first-hand. During the brief period from the premiere of Bwana Devil to November 1953, there were forty-eight features photographed in 3-Dimensions, and one final title, Revenge of the Creature, went before the cameras in July of 1954 bringing the Golden Age total to fifty features.
    One technical point – all of these films were originally presented in the superior polarized dual-strip process. The single-strip red/cyan anaglyphic conversions were not created until the 1970's for various re-issues.
    Fans of stereoscopic cinema can thank Arch Oboler and Sid Pink for taking a chance with a format that no major studio would touch. Happy 60th anniversary to Bwana Devil!
    In closing, I should mention that we tried our very best to promote interest with the copyright holder and a distributor that has licensed the film to present a 60th anniversary restored 3-D Blu-ray. Original 35mm left/right elements still exist.
    I'm sorry to say there was no interest.

  309. Johnny Angell

    I know I'm speaking legal heresy, but sometimes I wish copyright law contained a "use it or lose it" provision. Why acquire a property with which you can make money and than…do nothing but keep it from everyone else?

    I have talked to many people about this point including some in the business. This includes collectors, film makers, and exhibitors.
    To a person, everyone agrees that they have a "moral right" to make or purchase bootlegs of titles that are not being made available reasonably by their rights owners.
    There are many stories about titles or segments that were only preserved for posterity through the actions of collectors. I have seen rooms full of archive prints. We have all heard stories about things that the studios deny exist but that collectors apparently have. Some at least of these stories are true.
    The fact is that film buffs care more about the movies than studio suits do. Some of the most famous names in the business ordered priceless things to be scrapped. Try "The Magnificent Ambersons" original cut, the stems of the Hitchcock films, cuttings from much of the United Artists library, missing parts of A Star is Born.
    Exactly how did the collectors obtain these prints? By what legal means? The answer is, for the most part, that someone had the foresight to liberate them from some film depot before they were sent to be scrapped. One friend of mine claims to have seen several complete 35mm magnetic prints of A Star Is Born sitting at a film depot waiting to be scrapped, and regrets his failure to "borrow" them to this day.
    [BTW I am not a film collector, I am married. 🙂 ]
    Search your own artistic sentiments on this point and speak the truth.

  310. The 3-D Film Archive once held a near mint 35mm left/right Ansco color 3-D print of this film. It was screened at the two 3-D Expo's in 2003 and 2006. Desperate financial matters forced us to liquidate our print collection. It now resides at the UCLA Film and Television Archive.
    Unfortunately, nothing can be done without permission and authorization from the copyright holder.

  311. Greg, the shots you describe are in THE STRANGER WORE A GUN.
    BWANA has some rear-screen animal footage shot by Oboler in Africa in the early 1950's. It looks very grainy because it was blown-up from 16mm Kodachrome.
    Judging by the lack of response to this post on the 60th anniversary, I suspect the copyright holder is correct in their assumption; nobody cares enough about the film to make it marketable today.
    With that in mind, I fear only a half dozen or so Golden Age 3-D titles will ever see a restoration and Blu-ray release. There's just not enough interest…

  312. Bob, when I posted it, I thought that may have been another film. I did see them both, however, and remember the scrawny lion shots as well. I knew you would know for sure. I'd buy it on blu-ray, but clearly I'm not most folks. 🙂 I think House Of Wax would do good business, and I also think a couple of the 80's single strip titles would do well despite their technical limitations.

  313. Bob Furmanek

    Greg, the shots you describe are in THE STRANGER WORE A GUN.
    BWANA has some rear-screen animal footage shot by Oboler in Africa in the early 1950's. It looks very grainy because it was blown-up from 16mm Kodachrome.
    Judging by the lack of response to this post on the 60th anniversary, I suspect the copyright holder is correct in their assumption; nobody cares enough about the film to make it marketable today.
    With that in mind, I fear only a half dozen or so Golden Age 3-D titles will ever see a restoration and Blu-ray release. There's just not enough interest…

    Now, Bob, as I have said on more than one occassion, I would buy ANY Golden Age title on 3D Blu. And actually, of Oboler's three 3D films, I tend to think BWANA DEVIL is the best. THE BUBBLE has some good effect shots, but DOMO ARIGATO is a slow and painful torture. But BWANA is just plain fun.
    And actually, the shots of moving rocks and twigs in front of rear screen projection also rears it's head in THE NEBRASKAN. Drums of Tahiti has people moving in front of rear screen lava!

  314. Bob Furmanek

    With that in mind, I fear only a half dozen or so Golden Age 3-D titles will ever see a restoration and Blu-ray release. There's just not enough interest…

    You are probably right for 2013. We already have Dial M for Murder and Creature from the Black Lagoon. House of Wax and probably Mad Magician will be released next year. 3D Film Archive has Dragonfly Squadron and El Corazon y La Espada, which if you find a distributor might also be released in 2013. If House of Wax sells well, maybe Warner will release Phantom of the Rue Morgue, The Command, The Moonlighter, Charge at Feather River or the Bounty Hunter in 2014 or later. Paramount should release Hondo sometime.

  315. RolandL

    You are probably right for 2013. We already have Dial M for Murder and Creature from the Black Lagoon. House of Wax and probably Mad Magician will be released next year. 3D Film Archive has Dragonfly Squadron and El Corazon y La Espada, which if you find a distributor might also be released in 2013. If House of Wax sells well, maybe Warner will release Phantom of the Rue Morgue, The Command, The Moonlighter, Charge at Feather River or the Bounty Hunter in 2014 or later. Paramount should release Hondo sometime.

    I would think Kiss Me Kate would be given serious consideration ahead of some of those other titles.

  316. moviebear1

    Kate is really one of my favorite 3D titles. Once seen in 3D it's hard to imagine seeing it any other way and it has a beautiful Stereophonic Soundtrack. Come on Warners. . .This is a no brainer.

    I second the motion. Kiss Me Kate and Dial M for Murder may or may not be the best 3-D films, but they are my two favorite films that happen to be in 3-D.

  317. Originally Posted by Bob Furmanek /t/318309/meet-bob-furmanek-htf-golden-age-3-d-consultant/540#post_4006663
    So far as I know, WB is working on just one 3-D title for 2013 and that's HOUSE OF WAX.

    As grateful as I'll be to get House of Wax, I'm disappointed that Kiss Me Kate isn't (yet) in the mix.

  318. GregK

    If WB does another Golden Age 3-D title after HOUSE OF WAX, I would be surprised if it wasn't KISS ME KATE. Easily one of the best of the Golden Age.

    Kiss Me Kate is considered the third in the Trilogy (given that Warner doesn't own Andy Warhol or the Creature), so IF we see a third, it's guaranteed.
    I feel confident saying "If" with Feltenstein, I'm just not sure about whether we'll get a Warner fourth.

  319. The B movies like Second Chance are the ones I want to see the most. It's a shame the studios won't let a third party license the films they don't plan on releasing themselves. Perhaps Legend or Olive or Twilight Time would consider releasing 3-D classics if they could get them.

  320. Richard–W

    The B movies like Second Chance are the ones I want to see the most. It's a shame the studios won't let a third party license the films they don't plan on releasing themselves. Perhaps Legend or Olive or Twilight Time would consider releasing 3-D classics if they could get them.

    Twilight will probably release Mad Magician in 3-D.

  321. At least the footwork for THE MAD MAGICIAN and The Three Stooges' PARDON MY BACKFIRE have been done, so Sony or someone can release them on blu-ray if they choose. I already have the downloads on my PS3. Would be nice to have them both without so many compression artifacts. They otherwise look very nice.

  322. Yes Mad Magican is out as a MOD. . . but not in 3D.
    My question is . . .since they already have 3D Masters on some of their titles, I don't understand why they are not releasing them.
    The cost of manifacturing the blu-ray discs should be a minimal cost next to the mastering of the titles.
    Put out Mad magician with the 3 Stooges Shorts and I'm sure they would sell well.
    Columbia has quite a few 3D golden age titles.

  323. moviebear1

    Oh. . . . . I have been meaning to ask a question about the current 3D TV system.
    can 3D titles be put out on a standard DVD instead of blu-ray only?
    Just curious.

    Yes, but the resolution hit is pretty bad. No matter which 3D DVD system is used (field-sequential or Sensio side by side squeezed, which was approved by the DVD steering group) the normal 720×480 resolution per eye is halved.

    Peter Apruzzese

    It's legit, it's a MOD release from Sony. According to the reviews, it is widescreen.

    Yes. The 2D DVD is 1.85:1

  324. I for one really enjoyed your 60th anniversary BWANA DEVILpost, and I would of course eagerly snap up ANY classic 3D title, especially this one which I agree is just plain popcorn fun.
    And I'll just say again that besides KISS and HOW and MAD MAGICIAN that IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE and REVENGE OF THE CREATURE I suspect would sell reasonably well in 3D.

  325. Calling Sony/Grover Crisp and Twilight Time/Nick Redman:
    Wouldn't it be nice to release a 60th anniversary 3-D Blu-ray edition next year of Columbia's first film photographed for widescreen, presented in 1.85:1 with the original three-channel stereophonic sound, as recorded on location in Hawaii?

  326. This was not only Columbia's first feature composed for widescreen, it was the first actually recorded in magnetic three track.
    There are photos of the filming in Hawaii and the three boom microphones are very evident.
    The magnetic elements were not known to survive but RAH recently told me that he saw them in England while doing research years ago on LAWRENCE OF ARABIA.

  327. I'm cautiously optimistic. RAH recalled seeing the tracks. Whether they were ever preserved is another matter.
    The 5,230 seat New York Capitol was one of the first movie palaces to install a panoramic wide screen on June 10, 1953.

  328. RolandL

    Rita Hayworth in 3-D, Wide-Screen, Technicolor, Stereophonic sound and a Tex Avery short!

    Sigh….More unreleased Golden Age. Way to make us jealous. 🙁
    Pretty good critic blurbs for a 3-D pic, though.

  329. Why on earth go to see Rita Hayworth? Sure, she's attractive, but we film buffs know that she is very unlikely to be remembered as one of the screen greats. You'd be much better off going to see Tyrone Power in King of the Khyber Rifles. What great films that guy has been in recently. Why, sixty years from now, folks will still be talking about MacDonald of the Canadian Mounties.
    But don't bother with Beneath the Twelve Mile Reef with that new kid Robert Wagner. Take it from me, he doesn't have star quality and we'll hear no more of him after 1954.

  330. andrew markworthy

    Why on earth go to see Rita Hayworth? Sure, she's attractive, but we film buffs know that she is very unlikely to be remembered as one of the screen greats. You'd be much better off going to see Tyrone Power in King of the Khyber Rifles. What great films that guy has been in recently. Why, sixty years from now, folks will still be talking about MacDonald of the Canadian Mounties.
    But don't bother with Beneath the Twelve Mile Reef with that new kid Robert Wagner. Take it from me, he doesn't have star quality and we'll hear no more of him after 1954.

    Not a big fan of Rita, but I'm all in for King of the Kyber Rifles.

  331. RolandL

    Maybe this will be Twilight Time's first 3-D blu-ray release instead of Mad Magician?

    Must've missed a few discussions–Has TT said anything about Mad Magician, or are we just going on When, Not If guesses? 😀 (I was just about to order the PS3 download for thirty bucks, so it would be good to know ahead of time.)

  332. If I'm not mistaken, this is the place in Escape From L.A. where Plissken finds the security guard used as Target practice by one of the Carradines.

    Here's the lobby and auditorium of the 5,230 seat Capitol.
    [​IMG]

  333. Ejanss

    Must've missed a few discussions–Has TT said anything about Mad Magician, or are we just going on When, Not If guesses? 😀 (I was just about to order the PS3 download for thirty bucks, so it would be good to know ahead of time.)

    They did not mention a title or dates, only that they would be releasing a 3-D film from Sony in the future.

  334. Has anyone approched The Warner Archive Collection on putting out 3D blu-rays? They just released their first two MADE ON DEMAND titles. So maybe this is the way we can get some of the lesser titles in 3D. The two MOD blu-ray titles out are Gypsy & Deathtrap. I bought both and they look fantastic. I would certainly buy any and all 3D titles. Matt Spero