ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, N.J., March 16, 2020 — LG Electronics USA announced initial pricing and availability of its 2020 TV lineup featuring 14 new OLED models led by the new art-inspired GX Gallery series, Real 8K ZX series and the award-winning CX series that was celebrated as “Best In Show” at CES 2020.

The undisputed world leader in OLED TVs, LG is expanding its range of screen sizes in the 2020 OLED line-up — from the stunning 88-inch and 77-inch class models to the all-new 48-inch class model.

LG OLED’s self-emissive display technology enables precise control of lighting at the pixel level for the deepest blacks, most realistic colors and an infinite contrast while the stunningly sleek form factors of the new TVs are as breathtaking as the picture quality they deliver.

Building on LG’s commitment to outstanding design, the GX Gallery series (55-, 65- and 77-inch models) offers a uniquely minimalist aesthetic made possible by OLED’s revolutionary panel technology. This enables the television to integrate state-of-the-art picture quality in an ultra-thin form factor (the 65-inch model is only 20mm thin) without the need of a separate control box, and can also be mounted flush to the wall.

LG’s all-new CX series 4K OLED TVs will deliver the outstanding picture quality that LG OLED is known for.

Producing images of unprecedented detail and clarity, the LG OLED SIGNATURE ZX Real 8K series (models 77- and 88-inch models) delivers four times the screen resolution of 4K and 16 times that of Full HD. To guarantee a Real 8K experience, LG’s TVs meet and exceed the industry definition for 8K Ultra HD TVs as defined by the Consumer Technology Association, making them among the first 8K models qualified to use the CTA 8K Ultra HD logo.

LG’s all-new CX and BX series 4K OLED TVs each deliver the outstanding picture quality that LG OLED is known for. Consumers will also have a new size to choose from when the 48-inch CX OLED TV becomes available later this year. What’s more, NanoCell TV, LG’s premium LCD TV lineup, also welcomes two new Real 8K units (65- and 75-inch models) NANO99 series) both carrying the CTA 8K UHD logo like their OLED counterparts. Pricing and availability for LG’s 2020 full NanoCell TV lineup will be announced at a later date.

Featured in LG 2020 OLED (Z, W, G and C series) and 8K NanoCell TVs is the new α (Alpha) 9 Gen 3 AI Processor. LG’s third-generation processor builds on the capabilities of its predecessors, leveraging additional processing power and advanced deep learning algorithms to further boost picture and sound quality on the new TVs. The α9 Gen 3 heightens viewers’ sense of immersion via several new features designed to enhance movies, sports, games and other types of content.

Six 2020 LG OLED models have also earned the NEXTGEN TV logo from the Consumer Technology Association. NEXTGEN TV powered by ATSC 3.0 unlocks new features, additional content and provides more control and personalization for broadcast viewers. The six models earning the NEXTGEN TV logo are the 55-, 65- and 77-inch class GX Gallery Series 4K Ultra HD models, the 65-inch class WX Wallpaper 4K model and 77- and 88-inch class ZX Real 8K models.

LG’s 2020 TVs support the latest HDMI specifications including eARC and ALLM for higher-quality audio and a smooth, lag-free performance. LG’s 8K models can play native 8K content from HDMI and USB digital inputs and support a wide range of codecs including HEVC, VP9 and AV1, the codec preferred by YouTube and other major streaming platforms.* LG’s 8K TVs support 8K content streaming at 60FPS and are certified to provide 8K 60P over HDMI.

Acclaimed for its ability to accurately reproduce colors and filmmakers’ creative visions, LG OLED TV sets the standard for a true cinematic experience in the living room. The company’s latest OLED models have won the Hollywood Professional Association’s Excellence in Engineering Award and are the first TVs to deliver integrated calibration software that performs to a hardware level. And with support for the new Dolby Vision IQ and the UHD Alliance’s Filmmaker Mode™, LG OLED displays movies exactly as their creators intended. And with great visual and sound performance, the new OLED and NanoCell TVs provide easy access to high-quality content from the world’s top providers through popular apps and services such as Apple TV, Disney+ and Netflix.

The perfect choice for serious gamers, LG’s 2020 TVs pair superior picture quality with new gaming features for the most exhilarating interactive experience imaginable. As the first manufacturer to offer TVs that are officially NVIDIA G-SYNC® Compatible, LG is introducing a total of 12 new OLED models supporting this essential gaming technology. G-SYNC ensures graphics are rendered perfectly, increasing players’ sense of immersion by adapting the TV’s refresh rate to the frame rate of the connected hardware. LG’s self-emissive OLED technology employs the precision of individual pixel control to produce exceptional picture quality, low input lag and ultra-fast response time, for an immersive gaming experience without flicker or stuttering common to most displays. LG’s 2020 OLED and NanoCell TVs support HDMI VRR, making LG the only TV brand offering compatibility with a wide variety of gaming devices such as graphics cards and game consoles.

When it comes to sports, LG OLED TVs brings the excitement of major events into the living room like never before with its 120Hz refresh rate, which makes it possible to see all the fast-paced action in perfect detail. Features such as Sports Alert let users follow their favorite teams with ease, providing real-time scores, up-to-date schedules and more across a range of professional sports, including baseball, football and soccer all the while hearing the roar of the crowd in 360-degree soundscape with two Bluetooth speakers connected simultaneously to the 2020 LG TV.

LG OLED TVs are available at LG-authorized retailers nationwide. For more information on LG’s 2020 OLED TVs, visit lg.com.

2020 LG OLED 4K TVs Pricing and Availability

GX “Gallery” Series

OLED77GXPUA
77-inch class (76.7 inches diagonal)
$5,999
Available April 2020

OLED65GXPUA
65-inch class (64.5 inches diagonal)
$3,499
Available April 2020

OLED55GXPUA
55-inch class (54.6 inches diagonal)
$2,499
Available April 2020

BX Series

OLED65BXPUA
65-inch class (64.5 inches diagonal)
$2,299
Available May 2020

OLED55BXPUA
55-inch class
$1,599
Available May 2020
CX Series

OLED77CXPUA
77-inch class (76.7 inches diagonal)
$4,999
Available May 2020

OLED65CXPUA
65-inch class (64.5 inches diagonal)
$2,799
Available April 2020

OLED55CXPUA
55-inch class (54.6 inches diagonal)
$1,799
Available March 2020

OLED48CXPUB
48-inch class (47.5 inches diagonal)
$1,499
Available June 2020

WX “Wallpaper”

OLED65WXPUA
65-inch class (64.5 inches diagonal)
$4,999
June 2020

2020 LG OLED SIGNATURE 8K TVs

ZX “Real 8K” Series

OLED88ZXPUA
88-inch class (87.6 inches diagonal)
$29,999
Available May 2020

OLED77ZXPUA
77-inch class (76.7 inches diagonal)
$19,999
Available May 2020

 

 

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buckmichaels

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Having had an LG OLED TV with screen burn in, I would probably gravitate towards a model other than OLED. Is there a technology that gives you a great tv picture, without the danger of the OLED burn in? I'm looking for a 65".
 

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Mike, Not sure what vintage OLED TV you had, but wanted you to know that beginning with the 2017 model year and every year thereafter OLED TVs have integrated several technologies to help prevent burn-in. 2016 and earlier OLED TVs were more susceptible to image retention.

With that said you still would have to avoid static images that stay on the screen for more than 2 hrs without changing the content and that content with the same static image is watched every day.
 

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Wow. LG's new 8K set can play content that doesn't even exist but it can't play certain content that has existed for a decade. What a selling point it is to be able to play non-existent 8K content. Makes me want to run out and buy one right now. :laugh:
 

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Not sure, but I assume you are referring to static images that can burn into the screen? If this is your point, then please remember we had the same issue with plasma and CRT TVs.

Emissive display technology is more susceptible to leaving phosphor retention and burn in when the same static image is left on the screen for 2 hrs per day and the same content is repeated daily

Edge-lit or backlit displays are more resistant to displaying static images for longer period before they show burn-in.

Also wanted you to know that all 8K TVs deliver a better picture with any content, low resolution cable, 4K HD streaming and BDs than ANY 4K TV image quality can deliver. Samsung, Sony and LG put the best video processors and best panels exclusively for the premium 8K TVs.

Let's be thankful for technology advancements.
 

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Not sure, but I assume you are referring to static images that can burn into the screen? If this is your point, then please remember we had the same issue with plasma and CRT TVs.

Emissive display technology is more susceptible to leaving phosphor retention and burn in when the same static image is left on the screen for 2 hrs per day and the same content is repeated daily

Edge-lit or backlit displays are more resistant to displaying static images for longer period before they show burn-in.

Also wanted you to know that all 8K TVs deliver a better picture with any content, low resolution cable, 4K HD streaming and BDs than ANY 4K TV image quality can deliver. Samsung, Sony and LG put the best video processors and best panels exclusively for the premium 8K TVs.

Let's be thankful for technology advancements.
Not sure how you can say this, considering that there is a thread here discussing how people cannot tell the difference between 4K and 8K on any TV set of any size that fits in an average home. And I highly doubt that upscaling SD or lower quality images up to 8K is going to make them look noticeably better than 4K. I'm all for technology advancements but not when they drop a technology advancement that actually had real content out there that could use it while trying to sell us on an "technology advancement" that has 0 content, other than via upscaling. At least, 4K has a modest amount of native 4K content available. 8K has 0 native content and I expect will have 0 native content for a long time. Does anyone expect Broadcasters and other content providers to start broadcasting in 8K when most of them have barely started taking advantage of 4K?

I mean, if someone wants to pay a premium for a technology that has no native content available then, hey, it is their money, but 8K is an even more useless and expensive advancement than 3D capability:an actual useful feature with actual content that people were complaining was jacking up the cost of a TV set for something they wouldn't use.
 

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It's true that 8K resolution alone offers minimal advantage over 4K and it's also true that we have very little 8K content in the USA. However, my point is that all TV manufacturers put the very best video processors and panel technology exclusively in the 8K TVs models. So if you want the best TV it's an 8K model.

Also the Warner Brothers test that was at the HPA last month has little to no value for real life experiences. What they proved is that the human visual system can only see a slight advantage with a 8K display when viewed at further distances. They used two 88" 8K OLED TVs with 8K content that was down-converted to 4K and then up-converted back to 8K for the evaluation. Not sure why they did all of the up and down conversions as we lost image quality just from all of the resolution conversions. Further, we already know everything they determined many years ago from the eye doctors vision charts.

What I see every day in our a/v showroom is the very best premium 4K HDR TVs butt next to the 8K TVs with the same content everyone, novices and video enthusiasts can easily see all of the picture quality advantages of the 8K TVs.

Regarding 8K native content consider the following. Hollywood has begin shooting some films with 8K video and scanning film in 8K, 8K is a reality for NHK, and BBC. 8K camera owners have created native 8K YouTube videos, 8K games are available from PCs and 8K gaming will come later this year from PlayStation and X-Box game consoles. Also later this year Sharp and Canon will launch their native 8K HDR cameras.
 

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I normally tend to adopt early, but 8K is one "technology advancement" that I can wait to become commoditized. I'll only move up to 8K when the 4K set I have fails and 8K sets are all that are available.

I'm pretty sure by that time 16K will be arriving on the scene.
 
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I want to know where all the LG rollable OLED TV's are....

They demonstrated some awesome-looking floor-rising rollable Oleds. It's obviously something that would have broad appeal if prices were affordable, so where are they???

Rollable large-screen TVs solve a bunch of issues with large flat-screens. They'd be easier and cheaper to transport. You could put a 100"+ TV in the living room without the wife complaining that "it dominates the room". You could have variable aspect ratios like on projectors with no black bars etc.

I was expecting TV's that roll down like projector screens to completely replace two-piece projection in home theaters.

Am I the only one who wanted one???
 

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The only native 8k games you're going to see on the next Xbox and Playstation will be things like Tetris, solitaire, etc.

The power of these systems will make 4k/60fps gaming with highly detailed 3d worlds much more viable than it has been though.
 
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Later this year, at the launch LG will only offer the 65" RX series rollable OLED TV and they will be very expensive. Great technology, but it needs time to mature for prices to come down and larger sizes become a reality.
I think that's a huge mistake on their part. It completely misses the key value of the tech imo. 65" is far too small for it to matter or for anyone to pay a premium for.

They should be aiming for an affordable ($5000 or less) rollable TV that is no smaller than 100". Then it would bridge the gap between the home theater and living room crowd who actually spends money of this stuff.

I also think it makes no sense to position rollable TVs as s premium price product. People who can afford $10,000+ TVs usually aren't worried about saving space...

I was hoping to see affordable versions of their 103" 21:9 TVs too. LGs 2020 line-up offers nothing over their 2019 or 2018 or 2017 line-up for me. May as well grab last years close-out bargains.
 

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LG Rollable TV is a very niche speciality and difficult to manufacturer with the perfection necessary in this bleeding edge advanced technology. It's a luxury lifestyle TV and no other TV manufacturer can make anything close to this highly styled TV.
You can't compare it to any other TV. Luxury buyers are keenly interested in this product as it matches their minimalist style and desire to hide the TV.

We're not going to see affordable 21:9 103" TVs either.

Regarding LG's 2020 line up they have made nice upgrades from 2017 to 2018 to 2019 and again for 2020. Last year's TV prices are surprising close to the launch prices of the 2020 TVs. For example the most popular best selling LG OLED TV is the 65" C9 that is on final closeout for $2,199 and the successor 65" CX series is launching at $2,497. Anyone buying a new 65" OLED TV is very well advised to spend $300 more for the new 2020 CX series. Thinks about spending $2,199 for an older model when for a very little more you can get the new upgraded a9 Gen 3 processor with better up-conversion of low resolution cable content, and LG's new upgraded webOS 5.0 Smart interface.

Sorry we don't agree on these issues.
 

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I think rollable TV's are only a luxury niche product if they are priced that way. The vast majority of people don't care about better processors or understand what they are. A TV that folds away neatly when not in use is my wife's dream come true.

Flat screen TVs only overtook CRT because they look nicer and take up less room. The display tech in Plasma is inferior. LCD is inferior to plasma but overtook it because it was cheaper.

Try telling your average Joe about more pixels, contrast ratios, processors with better upscaling and interpolation etc and they glaze over. A large TV that rolls up from the floor is cool to almost everyone. But... Not for $15,000.

I think we will see the affordable 100"+ TV too. LG are already selling 88" models for around $2000. I've seen new 98" 4k LCDs going for around $8000. There's no reason not to hope that trend (of larger + cheaper) will continue.
 

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I think you seriously overestimate the number of people who care about hiding their TVs. Regardless, they are priced as luxury goods this year and your disappointment in that is not going to change the available number that LG can produce of this small market segment this year.
 
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I think you seriously overestimate the number of people who care about hiding their TVs. Regardless, they are priced as luxury goods this year and your disappointment in that is not going to change the available number that LG can produce of this small market segment this year.
That's true. I can't change LG's product catalog with the power of my mind. My disappointment won't change anything, except my interest in upgrading.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not anti-LG. I have a 77" LG Oled in my living room and two 65" Oleds elsewhere in my house. I love my Oled displays. They delight me every time I use them.

I'm just in the market for something larger for my basement home theater. I'd like to replace my projector screen with a larger flat-screen. The problem is that Oled has ruined me for all other display tech.

We were starting to see manufacturers experiment with larger flat screens a few years ago. It's important to state our interest in online forums so manufacturers know there is a market if the price is sensible.
 
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You should consider JVC's NX5 for the basement theater upgrade with Panasonic's UB820. The native 4K HDR image is stunning and nothing like this was ever possible before these two 4K HDR devices that were made in video heaven were available.
Someone I know has an NX5. They are excellent, especially for a projector in that price range. It won't scratch this particular itch though.

Now that I've seen 100" + flat screens, I'm going to wait a while before my next upgrade. I have a high-end 1080p Barco projector that will continue to fill my large screen basement needs for now.

If the flatscreen market still hasn't made any progress (with affordable 100"+ TVs) in a few years then I guess I'll put the cash into projector upgrades instead. I'm feeling optimistic though. LG has already released an 88" Oled. There is obviously a trend for bigger TVs.... A 98" Oled has to be in the works. Then, will rollable screens, who knows...

I've been a projector guy all my life but Oled changes everything for me. I just can't seem to unsee what I saw....