Jivaro 3D Blu-ray Review

Another Golden Age 3D title comes home to roost. 3.5 Stars

Another welcome film from the Golden Age of 3D joins the fold with Kino’s release of Jivaro, another fantastic job by the 3-D Film Archive in bringing a nearly unseen 3D film back to lovers of the format.

Jivaro (1954)
Released: 12 Feb 1954
Rated: APPROVED
Runtime: 92 min
Director: Edward Ludwig
Genre: Adventure, Romance, Thriller
Cast: Fernando Lamas, Rhonda Fleming, Brian Keith, Lon Chaney Jr.
Writer(s): David Duncan (story), Winston Miller
Plot: A gorgeous American arrives in Brazilian headhunter country, seeking her scape-grace fiancé.
IMDB rating: 6.3
MetaScore: N/A

Disc Information
Studio: Paramount
Distributed By: Kino Lorber
Video Resolution: 1080P/MVC
Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
Audio: English 2.0 DTS-HDMA
Subtitles: None
Rating: Not Rated
Run Time: 1 Hr. 32 Min.
Package Includes: 3D Blu-ray
Case Type: keep case
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: A
Release Date: 03/26/2019
MSRP: $34.95

The Production: 3/5

For most people viewing Edward Ludwig’s Jivaro on home video, this latest release from Kino Lorber will be their first opportunity to ever see the movie in its originally filmed 3D format. During the film’s 1954 theatrical release, Paramount sent the movie out flat in 2D rather than going to the additional expense and trouble of releasing it in 3D thereby ending Paramount’s association with the troubled format. And that’s a shame because 3D is one of the more positive elements in this otherwise standard adventure flick of the period. There’s also rich Technicolor along with the inventive 3D camerawork, all brought to us through the dedicated talents of the 3-D Film Archive who notch another triumph with their outstanding production of this fabled 3D effort.

South American jungle trader Rio Galdez (Fernando Lamas) volunteers to lead beautiful and alluring Californian Alice Parker (Rhonda Fleming) to her often drunken fiancé Jerry Russell (Richard Denning) who has allegedly found gold in a Jivaro shrine located in the remote Valley of the Winds. The problem is that the Jivaro are headhunters, and getting to the shrine will be a death-defying ordeal. Along with Rio and Ms. Parker are gold prospectors Tony (Brian Keith) and Vinny (Morgan Farley) who have tired of their penny ante prospecting efforts and long for a huge payout which Jerry’s discovery may afford them if they can get out of the valley alive.

Winston Miller’s screenplay (based on a story by David Duncan) neatly divides itself into three acts with the introduction of the characters and setting in the film’s first thirty minutes, the conflicts which arise between Rio and Tony for the favors of Ms. Parker (Rio is trying to keep her safe rather than trying to win her for himself even though he knows the alcoholic, lying Jerry isn’t worthy of her) in the second third, and then the climactic adventurous safari to find the missing Jerry and escape with their lives gold or no gold. Because so much of the film is set bound and not shot on location, the perils they face on their journey to the treasure seem somewhat small in comparison to the events in jungle epics like King Solomon’s Mines, but there are still some pleasures to be had as the explorers face hostile snakes, rotten suspension bridges, hurricane-level winds, and murderous natives. 3D really enhances the beautiful Technicolor photography and gives much wanted-and-needed depth to those jungle scenes (in 2D, the jungle is much less impressive or expansive). Director Edward Ludwig handles the jungle adventures in rather rudimentary fashion apart from a clever overhead shot above the bridge as it collapses, but it all moves along at a steady clip.

Fernando Lamas’ Rio shows admirable restraint through much of the film with the devastatingly beautiful Rhonda Fleming as Alice. Once it’s clear that she’s under no further obligations to Jerry, however, there is the build up to a passionate kiss, but the film curiously fades out just at the moment many in the audience might have been waiting for. Otherwise, both actors look gorgeous and handle their scenes smoothly (there’s an enjoyable eating scene where Fleming’s Alice must feign enjoyment of some gag-inducing fish chili prepared by Lamas’ Rio), and they allow Brian Keith in one of his earliest film appearances to walk away with the movie as the calculating, two-fisted hedonist Tony. Popping in for small roles are Lon Chaney as a cheating storekeeper, Rita Moreno as a fiery native girl who had become Jerry’s kept woman in the jungle, Richard Denning out of character as the stumbling, drunken architect Jerry Russell, Marvin Miller as the threatening Jivaro chief, and Pascual Pena and Morgan Farley as loyal right-hand men to Rio and Tony respectively.

Video: 4.5/5

3D Rating: 5/5

The film has been framed at 1.66:1 for this video presentation and is offered in 1080p resolution using the MVC (3D)/AVC (2D) codec. Apart from a single white scratch, a bit of color fringing, and a dust speck here and there, this is another triumph for the 3-D Film Archive who has done a remarkable job cleaning the film and bringing it up to modern expectations (just look at the dirty, speck-filled trailer to realize how much work needed to be accomplished on this vintage film). Color is excellent throughout always matching and sometimes outpacing the beauties of the previous Sangaree and Inferno. Skin tones are particularly appealing. The movie has been divided into 10 chapters.

From the moment the opening credits appear many feet in front of the screen, you know you’re in for a tremendous good time with the 3D implementation. The cinematography emphasizes the differing viewing planes throughout (stock shots that aren’t in 3D are noticeable but not at all problematic), and there is no crosstalk whatsoever in this presentation. Forward projections in addition to the main titles are plentiful, most notably a shrunken head that is thrust into our faces on two occasions but also including poles, bottles, vases, chairs, spears, and arrows that come hurtling toward the camera. Depth in the studio sets is constantly enhanced by the use of 3D.

Audio: 5/5

The audio is presented in DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono. It’s a strong, solid track unencumbered by any age-related problems with hiss, pops, flutter, or humming. Dialogue is always completely discernible and has been mixed well with Gregory Stone’s background music and the many sound effects (with the rain storms and wind especially strong components).

Special Features: 3.5/5

Audio Commentary: Members of the 3-D Film Archive share their areas of expertise with the listener. Jack Theakston and Hillary Hess provide lively and entertaining historical commentary on the actors in the film and the movie’s place in the history of 3D. Greg Kintz discusses 3D alignment and color correction necessary to bring the movie up to modern standards, and Mike Ballew offers learned technical expertise on the variable parallax at play in the film’s complex cinematography.

A Shot by Shot Stereoscopic Analysis (8:26, 3D): a section of the movie is overlaid with information on the lenses and photographer’s range of focus for each shot.

Theatrical Trailer (2:16, HD)

Kino Trailers (HD), trailers for other 3D releases from Kino include Cease Fire, Sangaree, Those Redheads from Seattle, and The Maze (in 3D).

Overall: 3.5/5

Another welcome film from the Golden Age of 3D joins the fold with Kino’s release of Jivaro. The 3-D Film Archive has done another fantastic job in bringing a nearly unseen 3D film back to lovers of the format, and this presentation likely couldn’t be bettered.

Published by

Matt Hough

editor,member

61 Comments

  1. Well I've already pre-ordered mine and I can't wait. Literally. 3DFA makes me wait so damn long between releases (like this) that I do want that I wind up having to buy the ones I don't want (APE, Stewardesses) just to feed my golden/silver-age 3D jones….

  2. I love these releases and am collecting them all. Universal, TT and WB (?) I think have put out a few of these vintage 3D films, but 3DFA does the best job on them. Even when the movies themselves are not that great, they are a guilty pleasure and a feast for the eyes. Especially in widescreen and technicolor! Always feels like a time traveled to the 1950s.

  3. The commentaries that your group records are always among my favorites. Great blend of information, anecdotes and good personalities. I’m looking forward to this one too!

    I need to warn the wife that this will be the movie selection of the night on its release date! 🙂

  4. Josh Steinberg

    The commentaries that your group records are always among my favorites. Great blend of information, anecdotes and good personalities. I’m looking forward to this one too!

    I need to warn the wife that this will be the movie selection of the night on its release date! 🙂

    Thank you very much, Josh.

    Hillary Hess, Jack Theakston, Greg Kintz and (making his first of many commentary track appearances) Mike Ballew really hit a grand slam on this one.

    I must say – in my humble opinion – with their scholarly discussion of lens and variable interaxial settings, convergence and other technical matters with the remarkable Paravision camera rig, it is by far the most comprehensive and technically informative commentary track on any vintage 3-D feature to date!

  5. Finally watched Sangaree last night. If this is anything like that one, we're in for a great treat! Hopefully Jivaro is actually a better movie than Sangaree, but the presentation was nearly flawless to my eyes, especially considering the elements the 3D Archive had to work with. Awesome job!

  6. Speaking as someone who has actually seen an advanced copy of this new 3D Bluray of Jivaro at the 3D Film Archive’s screening room (thank you Bob) I was more than pleased with the restoration and 3D mastering. Another fine job, everyone who was happy with prior Blurays mastered by the 3DFA will be more than pleased with this one.

    I have always enjoyed Jivaro, and it will be a treat to own it in a few weeks when the Bluray is released.

  7. Got my Jivaro (courtesy Hamilton Books in Connecticut). Paid $31.58 to get it a week early and it was worth every penny. I'll probably be viewing it so many times (next time I listen to the commentary track) that I'll be amortizing that cost down to $1 per viewing pretty quickly.

    Folks, this blu ray is outstanding. Literally. The Paramount logo and opening credits protrude halfway into your living room. At times you'll think you're in the jungle with the characters. And you haven't seen Rhonda Fleming until you've seen her in this. 😛

    Another gorgeously rendered triumph from the good people at 3DFA.

    Jivaro…..

    [​IMG]

  8. Camps

    Got my Jivaro (courtesy Hamilton Books in Connecticut). Paid $31.58 to get it a week early and it was worth every penny. I'll probably be viewing it so many times (next time I listen to the commentary track) that I'll be amortizing that cost down to $1 per viewing pretty quickly.

    Folks, this blu ray is outstanding. Literally. The Paramount logo and opening credits protrude halfway into your living room. At times you'll think you're in the jungle with the characters. And you haven't seen Rhonda Fleming until you've seen her in this. 😛

    Another gorgeously rendered triumph from the good people at 3DFA.

    Jivaro…..

    [​IMG]

    Yep. When those credits came right at my face and were sitting halfway between me and the TV, I got the biggest ol' smile on my face that didn't leave it for the entire running time of the movie.

  9. Received this yesterday and watched last night. Another wonderful classic 3D film with a mostly great presentation considering the age of the film. I noticed a few scenes where the left eye didn't seem as clear as the right eye. I assume this has something to do with the elements used, though I haven't found anything that really discusses the elements or the limitations in restoration. I find this is a relatively common occurrence with these classic 3D films, so I think it must just be down to the condition of the elements and limitations of restoration.

    There was also one brief scene with badly out-of-sync audio. It's the scene on the boat just after Rio has served Alice that horrible meal that he's so proud of, and she's dumping it over the side into the river. Alice's line is delivered without her mouth moving, then her mouth moves a couple seconds later to no sound. It only happened that one time, for that one line, so I'm not sure what that's about. Anyone else notice this, or is it just a glitch in my system?

  10. Malcolm R

    There was also one brief scene with badly out-of-sync audio. It's the scene on the boat just after Rio has served Alice that horrible meal that he's so proud of, and she's dumping it over the side into the river. Alice's line is delivered without her mouth moving, then her mouth moves a couple seconds later to no sound. It only happened that one time, for that one line, so I'm not sure what that's about. Anyone else notice this, or is it just a glitch in my system?

    IIRC, it was like that on the master Bob previewed for me, so it's not your disc or setup but the original material.

  11. Peter Apruzzese

    IIRC, it was like that on the master Bob previewed for me, so it's not your disc or setup but the original material.

    Not a huge deal, but it seems odd it wasn't mentioned in the disc review, and it seems like it would be a simple thing to fix with today's audio editing software and such.

  12. That audio anomaly was on the track master that we received from Paramount and so far as we know, is present in the original mix. We did not have a 1954 optical track element for reference so rather than change something that might have always been there, we let it remain.

  13. Bob Furmanek

    That audio anomaly was on the track master that we received from Paramount and so far as we know, is present in the original mix. We did not have a 1954 optical track element for reference so rather than change something that might have always been there, we let it remain.

    It's got to be a tough call on some of those – but like the doctors… first rule-Do No Harm
    Thanks for all you and your teams work.

  14. It IS a tough call because we all heard it. The sync issue even got flagged by the good people at Duplitech, our replication facility.

    I listened to it over and over and over again. Not to toot my own horn, but I know audio pretty well. (I've got a few RIAA certified gold records to my credit.) I could hear no signs whatsoever of damage, looping or other signs of post-production tampering and without having an original 1954 optical track element for reference, I have to assume they screwed up on the original mix.

  15. Josh Steinberg

    I want to be Bob when I grow up! 😀

    I just got the email from UPS that a package was delivered at my house. There's only one thing that could be in it. I cannot wait!

    You're on HTF – You'll never grow up!
    [​IMG]

  16. I watched it last night and really loved it. Part of my enjoyment was from the charisma of the two stars and the able supporting cast. The 3D was outstanding. One "at you" shot literally had me ducking, but there were just enough of those type of shots for novelty and not that many as to be overdone. Terrific restoration, keep them coming!

  17. Nice job,m 3DFA!

    JIVARO was a staple of New York's WOR-TV in the 60's (in black and white), and I watched it several times on Million Dollar Movie but remember nothing about it from my youth. Not a memorable film for a boy, I guess.

    This release is a revelation. I've always loved jungle settings in adventure films, even if stage-bound, and the greens in the foliage here are brilliant. Flesh tones sometimes are overly saturated toward red and orange, but the image throughout is sharp as tack. The story is rather tepid, but a good cast kept me from checking the remaining time every ten minutes. The 3D is fun and beautifully restored. Without it, this film would be mediocre at best.

    What a weird and (to my ears) an often inappropriate music score! (I don't like the score for THE AFRICAN QUEEN much, either, another jungle film with a dilapidated boat and two lovers aboard).

    Marvin Miller as a Jivaro chief is a hoot!

    Terrific commentary, guys.

    Keep 'em comin'!

  18. Watched this tonight and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Listening to the commentary, Jack Theakston reveals that the right eye scan came from the original camera negative. Bob, is this the side used when we select the 2D option ? The 2D sure looks good.

  19. Rob W

    Watched this tonight and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Listening to the commentary, Jack Theakston reveals that the right eye scan came from the original camera negative. Bob, is this the side used when we select the 2D option ? The 2D sure looks good.

    That probably explains what I saw when I watched. The image in one eye seemed signicantly clearer and more detailed than the other in some scenes. Almost like I had a smudge on one lens of my glasses. But it was only noticeable in some scenes, and didn't really detract from the overall amazing experience.

  20. I had planned to trek into town to check out a current 3D film, but when a certain Treasure from Amazon arrived at work, that plan was instantly put on the backburner.

    Jivaro is one of those films I feel like I've been waiting a long time to see. Back when I first became interested in these films, it was a title that jumped out at me. The poster art showed a movie with strong pulp appeal: romance, danger, exotic setting, head-hunting indians, lost ruins. The movie seemed to have everything. I wasn't going to wait any longer. Would it live up to the anticipation?

    [​IMG]

    I was thrilled to find one of the most richly textured, visually dynamic 3-D films I have ever seen. Hats off to Kino Lorber and the 3-D Film Archive crew for bringing this gem back. 1950s audiences were cheated, they really missed out. This is an example where 3-D really elevates a film. Lost Treasure indeed . The crisp, luminous stereography was a pure joy.

    For most of the film, we follow around Fernando's character and we get a sense of how he lives his life and who he is as he trades with the indians and the settlers. He is honourable, industrious, amiable and fair in his dealings … with various cheats and lowlifes, but he doesn't suffer fools. Somehow he gets into a fight just about everywhere he goes, but always comes out on top. When Alice Parker(Fleming) shows up, the two are drawn together as he is compelled to shield her from the unwelcome advances of Tony(Brian Keith). In the absence of her fiancé, they restrain their mutual attraction at every turn, and no one has the nerve to tell her the truth. It is well into the second half of the film before we enter, as Jack Theakston aptly put it 'full Indiana Jones mode'. Of course for Fernando, this necessitates a costume change, complete with fedora, to distinguish from his previous, more laid-back jungle skipper mode earlier in the picture. From this point on, all the promises of that pulp adventure poster will be fulfilled!

    The jungle sets are thick and varied, and stand up well to the impressive studio weather effects. This makes for brilliant 3D, filling the screen with movement. There are a number of specific 3D gags throughout the film, mostly well-integrated, and often very effective.

    Now, I'm quite aware that actual Amazon scenery has a different look from this studio version, but the lack of true location photography is not to the film's detriment. I fully bought into their vision, being more of a Hollywood fantasy than a realistic depiction. It's possible to deconstruct what we're looking at here in terms of sets used, stock and 2nd unit footage, but in watching the film, I was more than happy to buy into the illusion and suspend disbelief. From my understanding of the commentary, much of this would've been filmed on the same soundstages as Those Redheads, and Sangaree, and while I can see some similarities, I find there's a certain magic in the artifice and how they were able to give it a distinct feel to each film. The work of the set dressers and the production design is to be commended, and it is plain to see that due consideration has been given to the demands of dimensional filming in these regards.

    I was impressed with how director Edward Ludvig fills the village sets with a lot of casual activity, and even indoor scenes are full of windows and other openings to show this. The extras all seemed to have their own story, which added a sense of believability to the artifice, but also makes for a very rewatchable film. Looking around the frame, from foreground to background there's a lot of details to take in, and it's not just a busy distraction. On first viewing you only notice the relevent aspects, and the 3-D seems to direct our attention.

    It's easily one of the best representations of the classic Technicolor look among vintage 3-D movies on bluray. Very striking colour palette. Greg Kintz and Jack Theakston have done a fine job here. Of course it also makes a big difference that Jivaro doesn't suffer from the lengthy opticals that plagued previous Pine Thomas 3-D productions.

    Rhonda Fleming really lives up to her reputation as one of the great Technicolor queens, and I felt among her 3-D titles, she makes her strongest impression here, both in the nuances of her performance and sheer visual impact. Her immaculate complexion and flaming red locks burst right out of the screen! Indeed it appears to have posed a real challenge in panel matching these tones left to right, which gives her hair even more of an incandescent quality, which is more than any 2d film can offer! Both leads are in top form. Fernando Lamas strikes the right balance between forcefulness and restraint. He exudes natural charisma, with a melodic, rhythmic quality to his accent and pronunciation, and is a magnetic presence. It's not hard to see why he became a star. Brian Keith gives a suitably menacing performance, and is especially good in some vigorous fight scenes. Look out for the scene in which he's clocked in the head with a pot; he gives a perfectly timed reaction before lunging forward, switchblade in hand.

    I ended up rewatching Jivaro multiple times, and it's become a new favourite. It can be bittersweet when you find a movie that really showcases the potential of 3-D, because it's lamentable just how brief the Golden Age was. I came away wishing I could find more films like this. Alas they don't exist, at least not in 3-D. With all the different genres and types of movie that classic Hollywood did so well, in many cases there were only one or two examples given the 3-D treatment, really just scratching the surface of what might have been. They should all be preserved and made available like this.

  21. Well, we now have roughly 40% of the Golden Age 3D classics available on Blu-ray. That's pretty phenomenal when you think about it. Mr. Furmanek has said that more are on the way. If my 65" OLED 3D display goes bad on me, I'm in deep shit!

  22. Dick

    Well, we now have roughly 40% of the Golden Age 3D classics available on Blu-ray. That's pretty phenomenal when you think about it. Mr. Furmanek has said that more are on the way. If my 65" OLED 3D display goes bad on me, I'm in deep shit!

    So no one repairs them? Can't get parts for 3D TV's?

  23. RolandL

    So no one repairs them? Can't get parts for 3D TV's?

    After warranty expires, I don't know. I've got a year left on mine. Full warranty means someone would come to my home and, if necessary, remove the t.v. to a repair venue and then return it. Beyond the warranty period, the cost to me would be phenominal, if such repairs are even still available.

  24. Dick

    Well, we now have roughly 40% of the Golden Age 3D classics available on Blu-ray. That's pretty phenomenal when you think about it. Mr. Furmanek has said that more are on the way. If my 65" OLED 3D display goes bad on me, I'm in deep shit!

    Time for a projector.

  25. Josh Steinberg

    I think some other forum members have reported unfortunate experiences where, when their in-warranty 3D sets malfunctioned, the manufacturer was only able to replace with a 2D set.

    Unquestionably my biggest fear. Though my back-up plasma is a 3D TV, I have begun thinking about how I could transition to a projector should the need arise.

  26. John Hermes

    Time for a projector.

    I would not be adverse to this except I would lose those incredible deep blacks, which to me make watching outer space movies a new and richer experience.

  27. Dick

    I would not be adverse to this except I would lose those incredible deep blacks, which to me make watching outer space movies a new and richer experience.

    You will gain a giant screen. Mine is a dinky 106" diagonal for 1.78 and I have a 110" wide 2.35 wall screen behind it for scope. You can always get a JVC projector. They are known for their blacks and contrast and you can have a much bigger screen. I am a DLP man myself (best 3-D around) since my favorite movies are from the 1950s and 1960s when movies were more fully-lit. In any event, the projectors have not abandoned 3-D.

  28. Matt Hough

    Unquestionably my biggest fear. Though my back-up plasma is a 3D TV, I have begun thinking about how I could transition to a projector should the need arise.

    At the time that the 2016 OLED LGs were vanishing and were known as the best passive 3D sets around, I was extremely tempted to buy one, despite the fact that I watch movies on my projector and almost never on the TV. I didn’t get it, and felt bad about that decision when my 3D-capable plasma died, leaving me only with a projector for 3D content.

    But then I thought about the flip side to that, which is, how awful I would have felt if I had spent $3000 on a TV just for it’s 3D capability that I had no plans to ever use, and then had that die on me anyway.

    If you need to go PJ one day, I’ve been a big fan of Epson’s gear in part because their PJs offer much more placement flexibility than everyone else’s, which is incredibly useful for those of us that don’t have perfectly ideal projection spaces.

  29. Dick

    Well, we now have roughly 40% of the Golden Age 3D classics available on Blu-ray. That's pretty phenomenal when you think about it. Mr. Furmanek has said that more are on the way. If my 65" OLED 3D display goes bad on me, I'm in deep shit!

    … absolutely, progress has been great, although naturally I wish WB and Sony were still in the game.

    I remember first reading about House of Wax years ago, and the description said something like "originally a 3D film". It was like when you read about the wonders of the ancient world. Somehow I never thought I'd actually get to see these . So it's been wonderful to see the fruit of the past few years.

    Even if my technology dies on me tomorrow, having the opportunity to see these has been a privilege ( – not that I'd be one bit happy about that loss!). But the more I see of these, the more it's not enough! The more it starts to seem like a grave injustice if films like Charge at Feather River, Money from Home, Bwana Devil and Phantom of the Rue Morgue never make it out of the vault.

    And in watching Jivaro, I just feel like why did they ever stop. The things they might've done. Not that I don't understand the reasons, but getting a taste for it, leaves you hungry for more. I'm just sitting there marveling at every terrific minute of it. I could've watched another 20 films just with 1950s adventurers cutting trails through 3-D Hollywood jungles and it wouldn't get old. Had a similar thought after watching The Maze. Where were all the other 3-D gothic melodramas and old dark house movies?

    There's a finite amount of these, and every one of them has brought something unique and different. It's probably as good a cross section as you'd find through the many kinds of movie being produced and what was popular at the time. Certain studios and rights holders controlling remaining titles have seemed largely indifferent and disinterested, and I wish I knew what it'd take for them to appreciate that they have something extra special on their hands.

  30. Dick

    After warranty expires, I don't know. I've got a year left on mine. Full warranty means someone would come to my home and, if necessary, remove the t.v. to a repair venue and then return it. Beyond the warranty period, the cost to me would be phenominal, if such repairs are even still available.

    I did a search on the internet and found a few places that specifically repair 3D TV'S. I have no idea what the cost is and if the 3D screens are still available. I have a 3D projector so no big deal for me. Except I'm thinking of retiring to Florida and all the homes have such small rooms.

  31. Well — it seems room size is something you have complete control over unless you are being sent to a non-voluntary living environment.

    Anyway — the only 'new' 3D Flatscreen still somewhat available is the 2016 model Sony ZD9 though I think only in the 65 and up size

    I'm sure there are used sets out there. Who knows, in Florida there are always estate sales and surely at least some of those folks have E6 and g6's that need to find a new owner.

    I've actually always wondered what amount of engineering would take to turn a great 4K 2019 OLED into a 3D capable set. What is the actual physical differences between a 3D capable set and non-3D set?

  32. For an active set, it’s software plus a radio signal of some sort to keep the glasses in sync.

    For a passive set, there’s a layer of polarization built into the screen itself.

    I’m thinking that a non-3D set with a high refresh rate could be jury rigged into an active set, but that a passive set would need to be manufactured as such from the start.

  33. Josh Steinberg

    For an active set, it’s software plus a radio signal of some sort to keep the glasses in sync.

    For a passive set, there’s a layer of polarization built into the screen itself.

    I’m thinking that a non-3D set with a high refresh rate could be jury rigged into an active set, but that a passive set would need to be manufactured as such from the start.

    I would think that a lot of modern TVs currently in homes and on the market have all the physical technology neccesary for active 3D. That was apparently the case with many Samsungs the year after they stopped offering 3D tvs. There were reports of people who'd been able to install the previous firmware on 2d-only models. You'd have to supply your own active glasses, but 3D options were in the menu and they worked.

    Since the lack of 3D was essentially a software issue, I had thought it could be offered as a downloadable app.

  34. I watched "Jivaro 3D" last night. Really excellent 3D.

    I'm making a guess that this film being shot with a variable interaxial may have made the camera team more aware of everything 3D. This film has the most perfect 3D shots that I have seen from a mid-1950s era film. Everything seems right with the 3D framing and convergence.

  35. .

    disctrip

    Just watched it and it was "O.K." It was way too "Stage-bound" for me. If you are going to shoot in Florida, shoot on location somewhere.

    The Florida footage is just a handful of establishing shots with stand-ins doubling for the actors. That seems to have been how Pine-Thomas productions operated.

    Actually I thought it was artfully done for what it was.

    Funny how Paramount had their Paravision 3D rig lugged all the way out to shoot a whole film in wartime Korea for Cease-Fire, but on Jivaro, location shooting in United States was sufficient a challenge to limit it to 2nd unit work. To my way of thinking, constructing an artificial jungle would be a daunting challenge, but obviously it was something they were very comfortable doing and had everything they needed on hand to turn things out more efficiently. In subesequent years when location shooting became more commonpace, I sometimes feel as much as they gain in many respects, films lost the make-believe fantasy quality that comes from working within the limitations of sets and matte paintings.

    aPhil

    I'm making a guess that this film being shot with a variable interaxial may have made the camera team more aware of everything 3D. This film has the most perfect 3D shots that I have seen from a mid-1950s era film. Everything seems right with the 3D framing and convergence.

    They would've presumably been filming this at a time when 3-D was under fire and drawing a lot of the usual complaints about eye strain. They could've gone the cautious route and just dialed everything down to the minimum, but that doesn't seem to have been the case.

    Mike Ballew has put together a one of a kind extra, and in watching it, I tried to understand the thinking behind the choices they made. One can have one's theories, of course I don't claim to know. I notice in the outdoor set during the Jivaro trading scene, they reduce the interaxial for what may have been problematic scenes, but are quick to return to full 2 1/2 inches. The interior Lon Chaney scene seemed to use reduced interaxial in most shots, with a lot of precise adjustments made from one shot to the next.

    The modern trend with native stereo cinematography produced a lot of subtle, shallow 3D. I sometimes got the impression modern stereographers were under pressure to set it and forget it at a point where nothing can go wrong or seem too strong, and only increase the interaxial for a handful of scenes. I don't think that's the approach they had on Jivaro, rather they seemed to want to use natural interaxial as much as the shot would allow, and reduced the interaxial mostly to allow them to shoot at angles and distances they might have otherwise avoided.

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