I Love Lucy Colorized Collection DVD Review

Classic episodes now colorized and in one set 4 Stars

The I Love Lucy Colorized Collection puts the sixteen episodes which have been colorized to this date into one convenient package along with a few bonus treats.

I Love Lucy (1951–1957)
Released: N/A
Rated: TV-G
Runtime: 30 min
Director: N/A
Genre: Comedy, Family
Cast: Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, William Frawley
Writer(s): N/A
Plot: A daffy woman constantly strives to become a star along with her bandleader husband and gets herself in the strangest situations.
IMDB rating: 8.4
MetaScore: N/A

Disc Information
Studio: Paramount
Distributed By: CBS
Video Resolution: 480I/MPEG-2
Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
Audio: English 2.0 DD, Spanish 1.0 DD (Mono)
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish
Rating: Not Rated
Run Time: 6 Hr. 53 Min.
Package Includes: DVD
Case Type: Amaray case with leaf
Disc Type: DVD-9 (dual layer)
Region: 1
Release Date: 08/13/2019
MSRP: $29.98

The Production: 4/5

Pioneering producer and performer Desi Arnaz always wanted I Love Lucy to be in color. In 1955 when color televisions became available for public consumption, he assessed the situation, but as much as he wanted color for his glamorous redhead, he found it cost prohibitive to shoot the show on 35mm color film and felt that widespread adoption of color televisions into households was too far away to make shooting in color economically feasible. Neither Desi nor Lucy lived to see the “Christmas Show,” the first episode of the series to be colorized, make its way to CBS network air garnering smashing ratings and instituting a Christmas tradition. In the years since that first 1990 colorized effort, the process has undergone massive improvements: that original attempt at colorization has been redone digitally along with fifteen other episodes over the years which have undergone the colorization treatment. While purists naysay the results, the public seems to approve with CBS receiving high ratings each time at Christmas and in the spring a new episode or two of I Love Lucy joins its sibling episodes in an ongoing series of special broadcasts. The I Love Lucy Colorized Collection puts the sixteen episodes which have been colorized to this date into one convenient package along with a few bonus treats, and while it might have been better to have them released in high definition (the network broadcasts are in 1080i), these DVD transfers must make do for fans.

The two-disc set includes the colorized episodes “Pioneer Women,” “Lucy Does a TV Commercial,” “Job Switching,” “The Million Dollar Idea,” “Bonus Bucks,” “L.A. at Last,” “Lucy Gets in Pictures,” “The Fashion Show,” “The Dancing Star,” “Harpo Marx,” “Lucy Visits Grauman’s,” “Lucy and John Wayne,” “Lucy Goes to Scotland,” “Lucy’s Italian Movie,” “Christmas Show,” and “Lucy and Superman.” Almost all of these episodes rank among the very finest or certainly among the most memorable of the series, and one must credit the CBS producers for choosing several specific episodes in which color accentuates the program’s visual appeal. It’s seems impossible to imagine that there would ever be a time when Lucy’s progressively drunken stab at delivering a television commercial, her desperate attempts to keep up with an increasingly sped-up candy conveyor belt, or her succession of encounters with a stream of Hollywood stars would ever fail to elicit gales of laughter from eager viewers. The added color doesn’t hamper any of these brilliantly conceived and performed comedy classics.

Colorization has come a long way from the crude early analog attempts that Ted Turner foisted on the public with half-colored dud versions of classics like 42nd Street, It’s a Wonderful Life, and Miracle on 34th Street. Here the colorizers from West Wing have used their advanced digital technology to go to the trouble of coloring eyes and tongues and hair (though Lucy’s brassy henna-colored locks sometimes seem more popsicle orange rather than the deep, rich henna from her movie days, an anomaly that varies from episode to episode), but the various wardrobe pieces by Oscar-winners Elois Jenssen and Edward Stevenson colorize quite glamorously in these episodes and demonstrate the star’s interest in stylish and form fitting clothes (the Don Loper dresses in “The Fashion Show” likewise look sensational). Overall, the color in “Bonus Bucks” looks the richest and most stable, “Lucy Gets in Pictures,” on the other hand, looks occasionally washed out while “Lucy Goes to Scotland,” the earliest of the colorized episodes here, offers the flattest and least vivacious color. The original analog color work on “Christmas Show” was redone years ago using digital tools and the flashback episodes within the show got their own color work a few years after that. For the younger generation, many of whom can’t stand black and white films and television shows, this attempt at bringing a new look to a classic television show is an understandable attempt to introduce them to the outstanding comedies of their fathers and grandfathers. And though the black and white originals are not offered here as they were in previous individual releases of the colorized specials, they are certainly readily available everywhere for those who don’t like these versions of the shows.

Video: 4.5/5

3D Rating: NA

The program’s original 1.33:1 aspect ratio is replicated here, and the show’s grain structure coming from film is also retained without digital manipulation (“Lucy Goes to Scotland” seems to have less grain than the other episodes). Because colorization works best with pristine masters, the episodes are spotlessly clean and sharp, and thus the colorized skin tones are appealing and more lifelike than one has any reason to expect (the skin tones displayed during “Harpo Marx” are especially impressive). Sharpness and detail are first-rate even if these are standard definition transfers and not the high definition masters of the network broadcasts. Because of the lack of high definition, there is some small amount of line twitter in tweed clothes and a tiny bit of flashing in outfits with wide stripes. There is only the tiniest trace of aliasing in this presentation.

Audio: 4/5

The disc offers a Dolby Digital 2.0 soundtrack, decoded by Dolby Prologic into the center channel. The mono mix offers era-appropriate blends of dialogue, music, and sound effects with most of the episodes free from age-related audio problems. Occasionally one will hear a bit of soft hiss, and “The Dancing Star” has some strange muffled dialogue for a few brief seconds.

Special Features: 3.5/5

Redhead Tales (25:46): executives from West Wing and CBS discuss the decisions and results of these colorized Lucy specials and some behind-the-scenes footage shows how the eight-week work process proceeds on each episode after research and collaboration fashions decisions about colors chosen and applied. Among those speaking are Ken Ross, Tom Watson, Jonathan Argus, Stan Rutledge, and Rick Carl.

Vintage Animation (1:04): Lucy-Desi stick figures colorized and interacting with their Philip Morris spokesman.

“Jingle Bells” (3:05): a colorized variation on the ending of the “Christmas Show” with the quartet singing the Christmas carol and being joined by an unexpected guest.

Audio Commentary: Doris Singleton, Keith Thibodeaux, and Steven Kay share remembrances of filming “Lucy and Superman.”

Overall: 4/5

Colorized I Love Lucy? Why not? The results of the sixteen attempts to bring vivacious color to black and white original classic comedy episodes are now collected in one box for all to see. Apart from reservations about this being a standard definition release instead of a high definition one, recommended!

Published by

Matt Hough

editor,member

62 Comments

  1. The problem with colorized films is the colors picked are basically arbitrary, and still quite, what the word?… fake. In black and white films, the color of clothing picked are chosen as to how they will look in black and white. For example, Superman’s costume in the black and white episodes is brown, not blue. When it went to color, they obviously had to change.

    I know some people who absolutely refuse to watch anything in black and white. And I would assume the younger generations generally feel the same way. I would guess they are the target audience. Perhaps I would extend the recommendation to them, but to anyone else, the question simply becomes, why?

  2. Gary Seven

    I know some people who absolutely refuse to watch anything in black and white. And I would assume the younger generations generally feel the same way. I would guess they are the target audience. Perhaps I would extend the recommendation to them, but to anyone else, the question simply becomes, why?

    That's a great question– several of my favorites are B/W (including at least two Westerns)!

  3. Josh Steinberg

    I think their complete season sets for I Love Lucy sold so poorly that they've just abandoned that format for this show — unfortunately.

    That's such a shame, cause the first two season of "I Love Lucy" on Blu-ray are really fantastic sets. Same with the first season of "The Andy Griffith Show," which must have done even worse, since they didn't even bother with a second season.

  4. AcesHighStudios

    That's such a shame, cause the first two season of "I Love Lucy" on Blu-ray are really fantastic sets. Same with the first season of "The Andy Griffith Show," which must have done even worse, since they didn't even bother with a second season.

    Both ILL and TAGS did horribly. But CBS had already done the digital work for ILL Season 2 by the time Season 1 came out, so they figured it was better to release it and at least get back pennies on the dollar, vs putting it on a shelf and getting absolutely nothing for it. That's the only reason we have that second season on Blu-ray.

    They are phenomenal sets, but CBS badly misread the market. At the time they started releasing them to Blu-ray, TV on disc was on life support with streaming having supplanted discs as the average consumer's preferred way to watch a TV show. CBS further compounded this weak market by releasing a single season set rather than a complete series set. Then, to make it worse, they set the retail price for the single season at about $120, which translated to about $80 on street date. $80 for one season of a 60 year old show just wasn't a good value in the then-current market (2014ish). At the same time that CBS was asking $80 for just one season of ILL on Blu-ray, you could buy the complete series on DVD for under $50. All of this meant that ILL on Blu-ray was dead on arrival. I think it would have been a different story if CBS had put out a complete series set in the $100 price range – that would have been twice what the DVD was but would have been a more reasonable price, and more importantly for the average consumer, offered them the entire product in one shot. I'm not sure if it would have been a best seller, but it probably would have been less of a disaster.

  5. AcesHighStudios

    Yes, I do remember now the price was ridiculous, but I don't think, after all the extensive work that went into both of those series, that a $100 complete set price tag would have been profitable at all for the studio.

    Presumably "The Twilight Zone" was profitable for Image at that price.

    But regardless… releasing sets that don't sell isn't profitable either.

    There's a sweet spot to be found, but they were nowhere close to it.

    The honest answer these days is probably that you can't rely on one single source of revenue to make a project like that financially viable. You need the combination of multiple revenue streams, of which physical media sales can be part of it. Selling the new HD masters for cable or broadcast syndication is another piece of the puzzle, and licensing them to streaming services is another potential piece. But the days of using a disc release to finance the entire project are probably long gone.

  6. I remember one of the last colorizing "fads" was in the early 80's. It was done for the same reason: younger people won't watch B&W because it's perceived as old. The The Police released the beautiful B&W video for "Every Breath You Take" and shot that idea to hell! And Anton Corbin's videos. And Herb Ritts…

  7. Gary Seven

    The problem with colorized films is the colors picked are basically arbitrary, and still quite, what the word?… fake. In black and white films, the color of clothing picked are chosen as to how they will look in black and white. For example, Superman's costume in the black and white episodes is brown, not blue. When it went to color, they obviously had to change.

    I know some people who absolutely refuse to watch anything in black and white. And I would assume the younger generations generally feel the same way. I would guess they are the target audience. Perhaps I would extend the recommendation to them, but to anyone else, the question simply becomes, why?

    The bonus documentary on the second disc explains how many of the colors were chosen based in many cases on careful research. They also explain why in certain instances they veer away from the original colors to something else. Lucie Arnaz went to the Fathom event a couple of nights ago where five of the shows and the documentary were presented in movie theaters, and she praised the documentary greatly in its explanation of the research that goes into one of these colorization projects.

  8. Colorization has always been around. They were hand colorizing silent movies in the 1920's. Computerized colorization has been around since the 1970's. There are people who say they don't like to watch anything in b&w, but there are also people who say they don't like to watch old movies and they don't just mean b&w ones. Those that have a problem with it seem to have an attitude that anyone who does like it is wrong and so won't stop proclaiming their opinions, while those of us who don't mind it enjoy the fruits of their labors, especially since the process is better than it first was.

  9. I don’t usually buy tv shows on DVD, but a complete series set is very attractive to me on Blu ray. I could not resist the Star Trek sets, and bought “The Twilight Zone” and “Dick Van Dyke”.

    I would buy “I Love Lucy” on Blu in a minute if it were a complete set. I am not about to buy it season by season just because it might peter out as it has.

  10. TJPC

    I don’t usually buy tv shows on DVD, but a complete series set is very attractive to me on Blu ray. I could not resist the Star Trek sets, and bought “The Twilight Zone” and “Dick Van Dyke”.

    I would buy “I Love Lucy” on Blu in a minute if it were a complete set. I am not about to buy it season by season just because it might peter out as it has.

    I bought all of those (Star Trek I bought season by season, along with ST:TNG and Enterprise) and also bought "The Rockford Files, "Batman ('66)," and LOTS of other entire series on Blu-ray. I've also bought "Stranger Things" and "Westworld" on 4K Blu-ray.

  11. I wouldn't purchase anything colorized just because I prefer the original format and appearance of old TV shows. Black and white gives me more of a nostalgic feeling and I know that's how the original TV audience saw them.

  12. Why no blu ray release? The first two seasons of I Love Lucy on blu ray were amazing. But they originally came out at 100 bucks a pop. Now they’re selling on Amazon for 20 bucks.

  13. A sad addendum to the blu blues is that CBS put its first colorized “Dick Van Dyke Show” special out on blu-ray, which included the special as aired, the individual complete color episodes and the individual complete episodes in b&w. A very nice disc. I had hoped that boded well for future releases as well as for the “ILL” colorized specials. Sadly, it appears to be a one-off. The subsequent “DVDS” specials didn’t even get dvd releases.

  14. I saw the Fathom Events screening of the five colorized "I Love Lucy" episodes a few nights ago and was duly impressed. I'm normally not a fan of colorization, but the technicians did an outstanding job in bringing the lustrous black-and-white to acceptable, even believable color.

    In the interesting 25-minute documentary that preceded the episodes, the technicians and memorabilia collector explain in detail how they went about determining the colors to assign to the black-and-white footage. For instance, there were numerous color publicity photos (for TV Guide, for example) to be used as reference, as well as the original color costume sketches by Elois Jenssen, who designed Lucille Ball's wardrobe for the show. It's also explained how complicated it sometimes was to assign and maintain via computer one of Lucy's striped dresses (for example) when it was constantly in motion.

    The technicians also put forth the interesting idea that since Lucy's hair was red, executive producer probably wanted to film the show in color, but it would've been very expensive, not to mention the fact that there weren't that many color televisions in early-to-mid 1950's America. They contend that careful colorization, as they applied it now, is the next best thing.

    For those interested in the upcoming DVD set of the sixteen episodes, don't hesitate to purchase it, especially at the low price of $19.99 at Amazon. I think you'll be pleased with the results. Besides, the 25-minute documentary is included to help you appreciate the colorization process even more. Matt Hough's review on HTF was right on the money!

  15. darkrock17

    Does the documentary say who did the colorization, as it looks like it was done by Pop Colorture.

    I actually went to one of the special showing at the movie theaters on Tuesday where they showed the Documentary and 5 episodes of the "I Love Lucy". From the documentary a company called West (something)…..Westridge? They were based somewhere overseas where they did the process of the colorization. From the documentary it takes a total of 8 weeks to colorize 1 episode. Tom Watson, president of the Lucy Fan Club, and another collector in the documentary, were used to get specific colors of props and photos that both had in their collections. Tom Watson had a lot of colored photos of the set back in the day and the other guy had a HUGE collection of "I Love Lucy" props, like dishware and the actually Piano that was in Lucy and Ricky's living room!!! From these props, they were able to get the exact colors of the dishware, and tablecloth used in a couple of scenes of "Million Dollar Idea" episode. The photos on the set they were able to get the exact colors of the costumes of Ricky's band members for one of the scenes that took part in the Tropicana. It was very interesting and I would highly recommend getting the 2 DVD set coming out next week for the documentary alone. Tuesday they showed the documentary first called "Redhead Tales: The Colorizing "I Love Lucy" and then they were followed by the 5 episodes ("Lucy Does A T.V. Commercial" (aka "Vitameatavegamin" episode), "Job Switching" (The "Candy" Episode), "Pioneer Living" (The "Bread" Episode), "The Million Dollar Idea" (The one where Lucy and Ethel sell Salad Dressing), and "L.A. At Last" (The William Holden Episode where Lucy lights her nose on fire). The theater I was at was a full house. They gave you a free poster of the movie event as well (see pic below). But what was really amazing was watching these shows again in a LIVE AUDIENCE setting. All sorts of people, young and old, who have probably seen these episodes dozens of times, laughed like they were just being showed for the first time! It really shows that Lucy's comedy is timeless and why her legacy still exists today after 60+ years of when these episodes first aired. Here are some pics from that night:

    View attachment 61556 View attachment 61557 View attachment 61558 View attachment 61559 View attachment 61560 View attachment 61561

  16. mrz7

    I actually went to one of the special showing at the movie theaters on Tuesday where they showed the Documentary and 5 episodes of the "I Love Lucy". From the documentary a company called West (something)…..Westridge? They were based somewhere overseas where they did the process of the colorization. From the documentary it takes a total of 8 weeks to colorize 1 episode. Tom Watson, president of the Lucy Fan Club, and another collector in the documentary, were used to get specific colors of props and photos that both had in their collections. Tom Watson had a lot of colored photos of the set back in the day and the other guy had a HUGE collection of "I Love Lucy" props, like dishware and the actually Piano that was in Lucy and Ricky's living room!!! From these props, they were able to get the exact colors of the dishware, and tablecloth used in a couple of scenes of "Million Dollar Idea" episode. The photos on the set they were able to get the exact colors of the costumes of Ricky's band members for one of the scenes that took part in the Tropicana. It was very interesting and I would highly recommend getting the 2 DVD set coming out next week for the documentary alone. Tuesday they showed the documentary first called "Redhead Tales: The Colorizing "I Love Lucy" and then they were followed by the 5 episodes ("Lucy Does A T.V. Commercial" (aka "Vitameatavegamin" episode), "Job Switching" (The "Candy" Episode), "Pioneer Living" (The "Bread" Episode), "The Million Dollar Idea" (The one where Lucy and Ethel sell Salad Dressing), and "L.A. At Last" (The William Holden Episode where Lucy lights her nose on fire). The theater I was at was a full house. They gave you a free poster of the movie event as well (see pic below). But what was really amazing was watching these shows again in a LIVE AUDIENCE setting. All sorts of people, young and old, who have probably seen these episodes dozens of times, laughed like they were just being showed for the first time! It really shows that Lucy's comedy is timeless and why her legacy still exists today after 60+ years of when these episodes first aired. Here are some pics from that night:

    View attachment 61556 View attachment 61557 View attachment 61558 View attachment 61559 View attachment 61560 View attachment 61561

    Thanks so much for sharing your experience and photos. I'm glad the event attracted a big crowd, too!

  17. Her hair just doesn’t look right to me (Ethel’s also looks off – it seems yellow). I wish they’d have the Pop Colorture guy do it – his palette looks really good, but I know it’s an intensely manual process the way he does it.

  18. darkrock17

    Does the documentary say who did the colorization, as it looks like it was done by Pop Colorture.

    I like the way they colored her hair in this video. It looks like a more natural shade of red, not like a synthetic orange wig.

  19. warnerbro

    Why no blu ray release? The first two seasons of I Love Lucy on blu ray were amazing. But they originally came out at 100 bucks a pop. Now they're selling on Amazon for 20 bucks.

    They should have waited and done a complete set. It is disappointing that they see more value in colorized best-of discs than finishing the restored Blu-rays of the series in the original black-and-white.

    I'm not sure I buy the "we would shoot in color if we could" argument when Walt Disney Productions filmed many of the Disneyland anthology series episodes, including but not limited to Davy Crockett, concurrently in color though originally broadcast by ABC in black-and-white. That show started while I Love Lucy was still running. On the other hand, The Lucy Show switched to color ahead of CBS's ability to broadcast that way. They switched to color in season 2 despite still being broadcast in B&W until 1965.

    There's also the business of CBS wanting their own color TV standard that was incompatible with RCA's that eventually won out, but that's for another thread.

  20. MatthewA

    They should have waited and done a complete set. It is disappointing that they see more value in colorized best-of discs than finishing the restored Blu-rays of the series in the original black-and-white.

    I'm not sure I buy the "we would shoot in color if we could" argument when Walt Disney Productions filmed many of the Disneyland anthology series episodes, including but not limited to Davy Crockett, concurrently in color though originally broadcast by ABC in black-and-white. That show started while I Love Lucy was still running. On the other hand, The Lucy Show switched to color ahead of CBS's ability to broadcast that way. They switched to color in season 2 despite still being broadcast in B&W until 1965.

    There's also the business of CBS wanting their own color TV standard that was incompatible with RCA's that eventually won out, but that's for another thread.

    To some degree Walt was more forward thinking.

    The animated open for the original Mickey Mouse Club originally animated and shot in monochrome was also animated and shot in color As shown on the Micky Mouse Club collectors DVD.

    Davy Crockett episodes were combined re-edited and released to theaters and are now available on blu-ray through the Disney Movie Club.

    (His company didn't quite follow through with color when it came to "Son of Flubber" which myself and most of the other young people in the audience, booed when the sequel to the color film came on the screen and was monochrome.

    One of the big problems with changing monochrome shot films/TV programs is that they were DESIGNED for monochrome which uses different photographic processes. For monochrome I was told to light for the blacks. With color I was told to light for the highlights.

    Target Cartwheel has this for 10 % off. Depending on the in-store price, I might pick this up from Target.

  21. Yes, and don't forget that Walt's Disneyland TV program was often used as a one hour launchpad for an upcoming feature film. He could devote a portion or the entire hour to an upcoming new release (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea's broadcast earned the Emmy for Show of the Year) in addition to his sometimes releasing shows as feature films themselves.

  22. MartinP.

    Those that have a problem with it seem to have an attitude that anyone who does like it is wrong and so won't stop proclaiming their opinions, while those of us who don't mind it enjoy the fruits of their labors, especially since the process is better than it first was.

    There are also people who don't mind 4:3: material being stretched to 16:9. Both practices are wrong.

  23. ^^^

    A straw man is a form of argument and an informal fallacy based on giving the impression of refuting an opponent's argument, while actually refuting an argument that was not presented by that opponent. One who engages in this fallacy is said to be "attacking a straw man".

    Or…if you prefer, as the Diff'rent Strokes TV theme advises:

    Now, the world don't move
    to the beat of just one drum,
    What might be right for you,
    may not be right for some.

    Most of the arguments about colorization aren't worth it because if you like it you can enjoy it, if you don't you can watch the original b&w versions. Or you can do both. Nothing is being taken away from those who don't like it.

    As for stretching pictures, as the instruction manual for my television advises, set it to where YOU like it.

  24. MartinP.

    Or…if you prefer, as the Diff'rent Strokes TV theme advises:

    That show, whose very last timeslot was summer reruns in the same Saturday 8/7 ABC slot the infamous Life with Lucy would air in, is already in color and owned by Sony, who also owns Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie, both linked to I Love Lucy via William Asher and Barbara Eden. They started in B&W and switched to color, then Sony went back and redid the B&W years in color in the 1990s. The DVDs gave you a choice but at a cost: BW used a decolorized version of the 1966 intro. And the complete series sets had the colorized versions of B&W episodes, I fear. Sony went for uniformity over the original format, so the only way to get the B&W episodes in B&W was to buy the seasons a-la-carte. Better than nothing but a bit inconvenient.

    B-ROLL

    (His company didn't quite follow through with color when it came to "Son of Flubber" which myself and most of the other young people in the audience, booed when the sequel to the color film came on the screen and was monochrome.

    Huh? The original Absent-Minded Professor wasn't in color although it was one of the first films to be colorized in the 1980s. Disney latched onto it for that and 1959's The Shaggy Dog (which was also 10 minutes shorter since it was done for broadcast TV). But outside the Christmas episode in its 1989 rebroadcast, it seems Lucy was spared up until relatively recently. And it seems this is just for select episodes. But for how long?

  25. MartinP.

    ^^^

    A straw man

    You call it a strawman, I call it giving an example of why people simply liking or not liking something makes it right. Another example is killing film grain simply because some don't like it. It shows no respect for the original intent.

  26. RobertR

    It shows no respect for the original intent.

    Original intent? Books were never meant to be condensed (like the Reader's Digest versions) nor to be listened to in audio versions, but there you have it. Movies weren't meant to be viewed on television screens or on cell-phone sized screens. Movies and TV shows weren't originally even conceived of being worth anything much after a certain time, either. Talk about no respect! As much as the visual part of these things always gets attention, there is rarely anyone who complains about the original intent of the audio aspects of movies and TV being altered over the years as that technology broadens.

    And people with complaints about these things always use that phrase "original intent." How does anyone know the original intent of all of these people?

    The episode of I LOVE LUCY titled Lucy Goes to Scotland–the original intent of that episode was to have it in color as an answer to NBC's Bell Telephone Hour's color broadcasts, their competition that season. That's why there are so many behind the scenes photos, in color, of that episode. It's why it was chosen to be the first colorized episode. But CBS decided they wouldn't pay the extra expense to do that and Desi wouldn't put up the money, either, so it wasn't. But the "original intent" (and it was prepped that way) was to have it in color. Now it is.

  27. Wow! that really looks neat in some scenes. all her pink, etc. I wouldn't mind having this actually. Although the nostalgia of ILL needs nothing but the grays and blacks. I've got to buy my 3rd set of IIL because of disastrous sets I got and being dumb and not checking. I might get this colorized when it's cheap.

  28. MartinP.

    Original intent? Books were never meant to be condensed (like the Reader's Digest versions) nor to be listened to in audio versions

    Audio versions don't change the text.

    Movies weren't meant to be viewed on television screens or on cell-phone sized screens.

    Conflating technology with deliberate alteration is not valid. Improved technology brings us closer to the look of film.

    As much as the visual part of these things always gets attention, there is rarely anyone who complains about the original intent of the audio aspects of movies and TV being altered over the years as that technology broadens.

    Where did I say it's ok to alter the audio?

    And people with complaints about these things always use that phrase "original intent." How does anyone know the original intent of all of these people?

    The episode of I LOVE LUCY titled Lucy Goes to Scotland–the original intent of that episode was to have it in color as an answer to NBC's Bell Telephone Hour's color broadcasts, their competition that season. That's why there are so many behind the scenes photos, in color, of that episode. It's why it was chosen to be the first colorized episode. But CBS decided they wouldn't pay the extra expense to do that and Desi wouldn't put up the money, either, so it wasn't. But the "original intent" (and it was prepped that way) was to have it in color. Now it is.

    B&W TV shows and films were meant to be shown that way. The lighting, prop and costume colors, makeup, and cinematography were done with B&W in mind. Ballyhooing ONE example of what "could have been" doesn't change that.

  29. If we're talking the weak, pastel colored offerings from the 80's, I'll pass, too. I've saw some really good work on recent efforts such as this. Nobody is forcing you to buy the colorized versions and the b&w option isn't being taken away. I don't see why people get so up in arms.

  30. RobertR

    Audio versions don't change the text.

    Have you ever listened to audio books? And are you seriously telling me that when an author writes something to be read he imagines someone else could be reading it to them? And Reader's Digest condensing books isn't changing the text, either, it's eliminating/editing it

    RobertR

    Where did I say it's ok to alter the audio?

    Where did I say "you" did. I said "rarely anyone" complains about it or even cares if they do. And they do.

    You can keep complaining and stating your objections to colorizing anything, but as you know, your feelings about it don't seem to be affecting those who are still doing it and providing it to those who enjoy it. The only control you probably have about it is to view it or not view it. Since it's ongoing, I doubt it's going to stop.

  31. MartinP.

    Have you ever listened to audio books?

    Irrelevant to the content, which hasn't been altered.

    your feelings about it don't seem to be affecting those who are still doing it and providing it to those who enjoy it.

    Feelings don't make it an appropriate practice.

  32. RobertR

    Irrelevant to the content, which hasn't been altered.

    If you mean deleting some pages isn't altering, fine. But there are quite a few examples of elimination.

    RobertR

    Feelings don't make it an appropriate practice.

    Then why should I care about your feelings about it?

  33. MartinP.

    If you mean deleting some pages isn't altering, fine. But there are quite a few examples of elimination.

    Deleting text is not an inherent characteristic of audio books.

    why should I care about your feelings about it?

    You did a lot of responding to me for someone who doesn't care what I say.

  34. i never watch old black & white movies that have been colorized. But I did buy the 2-disc Holiday Inn (1942) with Bing and Fred that features both the original b&w musical and the colorized version. The colorization is excellent and I have to admit I prefer it. I do think musicals are usually better in color!

  35. RobertR

    Deleting text is not an inherent characteristic of audio books.

    And its not inherent that all b&w productions are colorized either. You do like to obfuscate the questions.

    RobertR

    You did a lot of responding to me for someone who doesn't care what I say.

    If you look at what I wrote, I asked "why." You're making an assumption about whether I care or not and and then making a statement rather than answering the question asked, More obfuscation.

  36. MartinP.

    And its not inherent that all b&w productions are colorized either.

    When did I say otherwise? When it's done, it's wrong. When it isn't, it's not wrong.

    You're making an assumption about whether I care or not

    If you didn't care, you wouldn't have spent all this effort responding to me. I made a rational conclusion.

  37. ^^^

    "When it's done, it's wrong. When it isn't, it's not wrong."

    That's not a fact. It's your opinion.

    In the case of your second response, that's just more obfuscation that has nothing to do with the original "why" question I asked…and I think you know it.

  38. MartinP.

    ^^^

    "When it's done, it's wrong. When it isn't, it's not wrong."

    That's not a fact. It's your opinion.

    It's not my "opinion" that the original look of the film has been altered.

    nothing to do with the original "why" question I asked.

    Your actions are clear, and contradict you questioning your own motives.

  39. As filmgazer and mrz7 say on 8/6 there was;

    CELEBRATE FOR THE QUEEN OF COMEDY'S BIRTHDAY

    "I Love Lucy roars into theatres on Lucille Ball’s birthday with 5 full-length colorized episodes, and REDHEAD TALES, a brand-new featurette on how it’s colorized. Experience big screen laughs and receive an exclusive mini-poster!"

    "Fathom Events and CBS will present 5 uncut, full-length colorized episodes on Lucille Ball's Birthday, August 6, plus REDHEAD TALES – a newly produced and never-before-seen featurette on the colorization of I Love Lucy, and an exclusive mini poster"

    The episodes were:

    • Lucy Does a TV Commercial
    • Job Switching
    • L.A. at Last
    • The Million Dollar Idea
    • Pioneer Women

    https://www.fathomevents.com/events/i-love-lucy

    Video

  40. A friend and I went to buy tickets to it, online, but it was all sold out, at both theaters we checked. In Los Angeles proper there were only two theaters showing it and only one screening at night. So not much availability. We even checked the next closest theatre in Baldwin Hills. They had a few seats available in the 1st three rows.

  41. Colorization is a lot like the process that gets many Hank Williams fans up in arms-overdubbing. To try to make Hank more "palatable," his music was overdubbed in several different ways right up through the 1980's. Some people, like me, enjoy those versions equally well with the originals. Others hate them. Do you know what has happened? The originals are still more popular than the overdubs! I think you're going to find the same thing with colorizing movies and TV shows. If anything it will increase demand for people wanting to see the original.

  42. I was surprised as well when somebody claimed The Absent Minded Professor was in color. I believe it was done specifically in b and w because this would conceal the special effects better, I assume such as the wires used in the basketball game.

  43. roxy1927

    I was surprised as well when somebody claimed The Absent Minded Professor was in color. I believe it was done specifically in b and w because this would conceal the special effects better, I assume such as the wires used in the basketball game.

    I had long assumed it was for budgetary reasons. If I recall correctly, I had even read somewhere something to the effect that to meet their budget for whatever fiscal period, Disney had to cut color from one of their productions, and THE ABSENT MINDED PROFESSOR (1961) ended up being it.

    However, this article bears out Roxy's explanation:
    https://www.waltdisney.org/blog/absent-minded-professor-and-goo-flew

    It now occurs to me it might have been THE SHAGGY DOG (1959) that was shot in Black and White due to budgetary constraints.

    CHEERS! 🙂

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