Winter Glove Shopping - Recommendations Wanted!

Michael:M

Supporting Actor
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Mar 27, 2006
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I'm looking to invest in a good pair of winter/ski gloves this year. My hands and feet are typically cold from November to April, and even wearing some gloves from Lands' End with liners has failed to keep my digits toasty.

I don't ski, but list ski gloves as possible purchases because they're built to keep hands warm in very cold temps with high winds. Can anyone who lives or works in really cold weather make some recommendations? I'm looking for gloves that will take some wear and tear, but are WARM above all else. Thanks in advance!

I've done some preliminary searching online, and found a few pairs I really like:

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/2...f-For-Men.html

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/2...s-For-Men.html

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/2...f-For-Men.html

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...Search&feat=sr

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...Search&feat=sr
 

Jay H

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I gather you want Gloves, not mitts. Mittens are warmer but of course, you lose some dexterity.

I like the Schoeller material, they are kind of heavy (weight) but they make good ski pants and winter hiking pants because they do breathe well and they don't get too hot. (yeah, in winter, it's harder to stay cool and not sweat which you really do not want to do, hence the layers).

Your second link glove looks better than the first. Frankly, for non-athletic purposes, Goretex is overkill and we're talking about gloves here, not a parka or shell.

When you're talking about your hands getting cold, are you talking about at the beginning when you go outside or always? It's not that uncommon for your hands to get cold after the initial shock of your body stepping outside from a warm house... But if it stays cold, you either have circulation issues or as you mentioned, not-so-good gloves.

Your third link to the goose down gauntlets are nice, except don't get them wet. It does say waterproof but I can't always trust mfgrs claims and down is almost useless when wet. Not really worth it except for people who need less weight which down is lighter than most waterproof synthetics.

I ski, hike, and camp in winter and I also like to climb big mountains. I would layer the gloves into three areas, a basic fleecy liner, a middle glove and an outer waterproof gauntlet style overmitt.

Something like this

would be toasty... but they are mitts.

Jay

p.s. I have a pair of these gloves which I've brought to Mt Rainier and other mtns in the cascades except I just bought the outershell as I have enough winter gloves and liners to use underneath. Campmor had it on clearance when I was there once.
 

Jim_F

Screenwriter
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May 15, 2000
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I've used Pearl Izumi lobster gloves in combination with Thinsulate liners for bicycling down to 10 degrees F. It's the best trade off I could find between warmth and dexterity.
 

David Williams

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David Williams

Sounds like you may suffer from Raynaud's Phenomenon, in which case no glove is going to keep your hands warm. Making sure your head & torso are toasty will help a great deal in keeping your hands & toes warm. By keeping the head & torso covered & warm, it keeps the body from pulling the blood supply from the extremities to the core to keep it warm.
 

Greg_R

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Just like any other clothing, you will want to layer and use materials that will stay warm when wet (i.e. NO cotton). I have 4-5 pairs of gloves and mittens that I can wear in layers or swap in or out depending on the current conditions.

- wool fingerless gloves
- very thin Lycra / neoprene glove
- insulated mitten with GoreTex shell (extends to elbow and blocks all wind)
- leather gloves
- thick Thinsulite glove w. wicking liner

For super-cold conditions I'll wear the thinsulite glove with the mitten outside. This does a great job IMO.

Also, cold hands and feet can also point to inadequate insulation of the rest of your body. The body will constrict blood to the extremities when it gets cold (to save the critical organs). Perhaps you need a better jacket or long underwear. Again, NO COTTON.
 

Dennis Nicholls

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I drive convertables year-round, and find that simple thin leather gloves keep my hands comfortable on the steering wheel. They are by far the best for the purpose of my left-handed dexterity (is that an oxymoron?
).
 

Buzz Foster

Second Unit
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Jan 21, 1999
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Steve
I use heavy Neoprene gloves with velcro in & out gauntlet cuffs for winter driving...but unless you are driving in winter on a motorcycle, they migh be overkill.

And yes, my hands get cold anyway. I need hand wind deflectors.
 

Buzz Foster

Second Unit
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Jan 21, 1999
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Steve
I've never seen such a thing, but since most motorcycles have more handgrip controls than bicycles (front brake, clutch, turn signal, horn, ignition kill, start, etc.), I would imagine that a universal fit of this type of thing would be hard to create.

This, on the other hand, accommodates any type/size of glove, and any hadlebar control configuration.
 

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