Tweeter Dent in S 312's

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by MikeMcGrew, Jul 13, 2003.

  1. MikeMcGrew

    MikeMcGrew Stunt Coordinator

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    I just noticed a small dent/ push-in on one of the titanium dome tweeters in my JBL S 312's. It's not really that big of a deal but it has bugged me all day. I don't really know how long it has been there so I really don't think it is affecting the sound quality and I keep the screens on so you can't see it but I want it gone. Should I even bother with it? Is there a simple way to pull it back out without going into the speaker itself? MM
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Masking tape. Try sticking it to something first, to make the tape a little less sticky.
     
  3. Mitch E S

    Mitch E S Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't like the masking tape idea because it could leave a sticky residue behind that attracts dust. I used a shop vac. Put it as close to the tweeter as necessary to suck it back out. Keep your finger at the opening of the vac so it can't get too close. Usually within a half inch of completely touching the speaker itself does the trick. The sound should not be effected if you leave the dent though.

    Mitch
     
  4. Jason_H

    Jason_H Second Unit

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    Strangely enough, I had a dent on the woofer portion of my S312's. I used the tape trick and have had no residue or ill effects.
     
  5. Kevin*Harley

    Kevin*Harley Stunt Coordinator

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    If worried about residue use painters tape. Won't leave residue on anything. I haven't used it for this application but have used it on glass, plastic, wood, and the paint on my car.
     
  6. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    I bought a brand new JBL tweeter for mine when I damaged it and it cost $60 shipped from Harman.com. Right before I put in the brand new one my friend pushed in the dome being careless.

    What I did was use masking tape to push the dome back out again, but now it has many imperfections in the surface. There are small dents and creases where the dent caved in.

    I know that I have heard that the "imperfections" in the tweeter will not affect the sound, but has anyone measured what happens to a tweeter when it's dented in?

    I modified my JBL crossover to make them more revealing so I fear it may make an audible difference with the "imperfect" tweeter.

    Anyways, I'll try it out and find out tomorrow.
     
  7. MikeMcGrew

    MikeMcGrew Stunt Coordinator

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    I do not think that I notice a change in the sound as I didn't discover the very small push in until I took off the screen to clean. Then again, if it has been like this for a long time, then I may just be use to it. The tape idea is difficult to implement with these speakers because there is a plastic "guard" over the tweeter. That leads me to believe that a child and fingers were involved with this!!! Where's my son? Anyhow, I am going to borrow my dad's shopvac and give that a try.
     
  8. Danny Tse

    Danny Tse Producer

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    Hmmmm....I think the tape trick of "pulling" the tweeter back into shape works better with soft-dome tweeters, not metal tweeters like those of the JBL's (or my Energy's). For soft-dome tweeters, try using the back of Post-It notes since it was designed not to leave any residue. For metal tweeters, the "imperfections" will always be there even when it's pulled back into shape.
     

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